Monday July 23, 2018

Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating

Doctors adjust the medication dose based on the patient's symptoms and lung function

0
//
24
Asthma
Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating. Wikimedia Commons
Republish
Reprint

If you have asthma, chances are you may be taking higher doses of medicines than actually required, say experts.
People with mild asthma are advised to lower their medication dose once their asthma has been brought under control but the best way to reduce the dose is not fully known.

“We need to find a way to help patients control their asthma without overmedicating them,” John Mastronarde, director of the asthma centre at Ohio State University, was quoted as saying.

To control asthma, patients typically take drugs called inhaled corticosteroids to reduce inflammation in the lungs and long-acting beta agonists (LABAs) so as to open the airways.

Asthma Patients May be Over-Medicating
Asthma Medicine, pixabay

Doctors adjust the medication dose based on the patient’s symptoms and lung function.

Once a patient’s asthma is controlled, the drug dose should be lowered carefully. “But that’s where things just do not happen,” Mastronarde said.

Also Read: Have Asthma? Don’t Shy Away From Your Doctor

Once symptoms are under control, sometimes both the patient and the doctor just leave the patient on whatever they are on because they do not want it to get worse again.

Although low doses of inhaled corticosteroids are safe, taking high doses of the drugs for a long time might result in some side effects including weakening of the bones, he added in a report in LiveScience.  (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Premature Birth Linked to Asthma

Children born very early - before 32 weeks gestation - had approximately three times the risk of developing asthma/wheezing disorders compared with babies born at term

0
baby
Worldwide, more than 11 percent of babies are born premature. Pixabay

Is your kid suffering from asthma and wheezing disorders? The reason may be the child’s premature birth, research showed.

The risk of developing these conditions increases as the degree of prematurity increases, the study showed.

The findings are based on a systematic review of 30 studies that investigated the association between pre-term birth and asthma/wheezing disorders among 1.5 million children.

Worldwide, more than 11 percent of babies are born premature.

Across the studies that ranged a time span from 1995 to present, 13.7 percent of premature babies developed asthma or wheezing disorders compared with 8.3 percent of babies born at term, representing a 70 percent increased risk.

baby
The risk of developing these conditions increases as the degree of prematurity increases, the study showed. Pixabay

“Children born very early – before 32 weeks gestation – had approximately three times the risk of developing asthma/wheezing disorders compared with babies born at term,” the study showed.

“As asthma is a chronic condition, our findings underscore the need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the association between preterm birth and asthma/wheezing disorders in order to develop preventive and therapeutic interventions,” said Aziz Sheikh of Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) in Boston, US.

Also Read: Parental Interaction With Baby Important For Development

The study results were published by researchers at BWH in collaboration with investigators at the Maastricht University Medical Centre and Maastricht University School of Public Health in the Netherlands and The University of Edinburgh in Britain. (IANS)

Next Story