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Attractiveness in Males is Not Associated With Female’s Hormone Levels, says Study

The two faces in each pair were digitally altered versions of the same photo -- one face was altered to have somewhat feminised features and the other was altered to have somewhat masculinised features.

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There was also no association between attractiveness judgments and levels of other potentially influential hormones, such as testosterone and cortisol, the study said.
Male attractiveness is not linked to women's hormone levels, Pixabay
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Do you think women tend to prefer a particular type of man when they are fertile? If you think so, nothing could be further from the truth as a new study says that women’s perceptions of male attractiveness do not vary according to their hormone levels.

These findings, published in the journal Psychological Science, run counter to the common assumption that sexual selection pressures lead women to prefer more masculine mates, who supposedly have greater genetic “fitness,” when they are most fertile and most likely to conceive.

“We found no evidence that changes in hormone levels influence the type of men women find attractive,” said lead researcher Benedict Jones of the University of Glasgow in Britain.

“This study is noteworthy for its scale and scope — previous studies typically examined small samples of women using limited measures,” Jones explained.

“With much larger sample sizes and direct measures of hormonal status, we were not able to replicate effects of hormones on women’s preferences for masculine faces,” Jones said.

To address the limitations of previous studies, the researchers recruited nearly 600 heterosexual women to participate in a series of weekly test sessions.

"With much larger sample sizes and direct measures of hormonal status, we were not able to replicate effects of hormone on women's preferences for masculine faces," Jones said.
Representational Image, Pixabay

In each session, the participants reported whether they were currently in a romantic relationship and whether they were currently using hormonal contraceptives.

In each face-preference task, the participants saw 10 pairs of male faces and selected the face in each pair that they found more attractive, rating how strong their preference was.

The two faces in each pair were digitally altered versions of the same photo — one face was altered to have somewhat feminised features and the other was altered to have somewhat masculinised features.

As expected, women generally rated the masculinised faces as more attractive than the feminised faces.

Also Read: The funny side of impressing women

Preference for the more masculinised faces was also slightly stronger when women judged attractiveness in the context of a short-term relationship as opposed to a long-term relationship.

However, there was no evidence that women’s preferences varied according to levels of fertility-related hormones, such as estradiol and progesterone.

There was also no association between attractiveness judgments and levels of other potentially influential hormones, such as testosterone and cortisol, the study said. (IANS)

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Diabetic Women at Greater Risk of Developing Cancer Than Men, According to a New Study

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes

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The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.
The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher. Pixabay

Women suffering from diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing cancer than men, a new study has found.

The findings suggested that among the study participants, women with diabetes (Type 1 and Type 2) were at higher risks for developing kidney cancer (11 per cent), oral cancer (13 per cent), stomach cancer (14 per cent) and leukaemia (15 per cent) compared to men with the similar condition.

Diabetes affects more than 415 million people worldwide, with five million deaths every year.

According to the researchers, it is believed that heightened blood glucose may have cancer-causing effects by leading to DNA damage.

“The link between diabetes and the risk of developing cancer is now firmly established,” said lead author Toshiaki Ohkuma from The George Institute for Global Health in Australia.

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.
They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women. Pixabay

“The number of people with diabetes has doubled globally in the last 30 years but we still have much to learn about the condition,” Ohkuma added.

For the study, published in the journal Diabetologia, the researchers examined data on all-site cancer events (incident or fatal only) from 121 cohorts that included 19,239,302 individuals.

The researchers found that women with diabetes were 27 per cent more likely to develop cancer than women without diabetes but for men the risk was 19 per cent higher.

Also Read: Eating Dinner Early May Lower Risk of Breast, Prostate Cancer

They also found that diabetes was a risk factor for the majority of cancers of specific parts of the body for both men and women.

Overall, it was calculated that women with diabetes were six per cent more likely to develop any form of cancer than men with diabetes.

“It’s vital that we undertake more research into discovering what is driving this, and for both people with diabetes and the medical community to be aware of the heightened cancer risk for women and men with diabetes,” Ohkuma noted. (IANS)