Wednesday March 27, 2019
Home Lead Story Australia Dev...

Australia Developing Lasers to Track, Destroy Space Junk

But space debris does not have to be big to cause damage. A floating fleck of paint is thought to have cracked a window on the International Space Station

3
//
A meteor streaks across the sky in the early morning as people watching during the Perseid meteor shower in Ramon Carter near the town of Mitzpe Ramon, southern Israel, August 13, 2015. The Perseid meteor shower is sparked every August when the Earth passes through a stream of space debris left by comet Swift-Tuttle. VOA
A meteor streaks across the sky in the early morning as people watching during the Perseid meteor shower in Ramon Carter near the town of Mitzpe Ramon, southern Israel, August 13, 2015. The Perseid meteor shower is sparked every August when the Earth passes through a stream of space debris left by comet Swift-Tuttle. VOA
  • Australian scientists are developing new kinds of lasers
  • These lasers will be used to destroy space junk
  • There is an estimated 7500 tons of junk in space

Australian scientists say a powerful ground-based laser targeting space junk will be ready for use next year. They say there are hundreds of thousands of pieces of debris circling the Earth that have the potential to damage or destroy satellites.

Reducing the amount of space junk in orbit has been the focus of a meeting of scientists this week in Canberra organized by Australia’s Space Environment Research Center.

Telescope can view stars at ultraviolet wavelengths unhindered. Wikimedia Commons
There is 7500 tons of junk in space. Wikimedia Commons

The meeting has heard that a laser using energy from light radiation to move discarded objects in space could be ready for use within a year. Researchers in Australia believe the technology would be able to change the path of orbital junk to prevent collisions with satellites. The aim is to eventually build more powerful laser beams that could push debris into the Earth’s atmosphere, where it would burn up. Professor Craig Smith, head of EOS Space Systems, the Australian company that is developing the junk-busting devices, explained how it would work.

Also Read: NASA’s Juno spacecraft detects “Monster” Cyclones on Jupiter’s Surface

“We track objects and predict collisions to high accuracy and if we think a space debris object is going to have a collision with another space debris object then we can use our laser to change its orbits rather than crashing into a satellite or another space debris object causing more space debris. Again as we ramp up the power to bigger and bigger lasers then, yes, you can actually start moving it enough to what we call de-orbit the satellite by reducing its velocity enough that it starts to change orbit height and eventually hits the atmosphere and the atmosphere takes over and drags it,” Smith said.

The system, which would operate through a telescope near the Australian capital, Canberra, is expected to be finished early next year. It is estimated there are 7,500 tons of trash in space. This includes an estimated half-a-million marble-sized pieces of junk, while other items, such as discarded rockets and disused parts of space crafts, are much larger.

Cosmic rays
The lasers will be used to destroy space junk. Pixabay

In 2012, the eight-ton Envisat Earth Observation satellite unexpectedly shut-down in orbit, where it remains. The size of a school bus, the satellite is one of the largest pieces of ‘junk’ in orbit and could become a catastrophic hazard if struck by other space debris and broken into fragments.

But space debris does not have to be big to cause damage. A floating fleck of paint is thought to have cracked a window on the International Space Station. In Europe, large nets and harpoons are being developed to catch debris encircling our planet. VOA

  • Monty

    And we want to colonise the rest of the universe. We can’t even keep our own planet in shape. What makes anyone think that man will be any different on Mars or elsewhere?

  • RickFromTexas

    Extremely bad idea, space junk is made of exotic metals and materials, where is what’s left after this junk is hit by lasers going to go? That’s right, gravity will attract it into the upper atmosphere where it will interact in unforeseen ways with what’s already there.

    It might wipe out the ozone layer or interact badly with cosmic rays and/or radiation and then the whole planet’s screwed, but the point is no one knows what will happen and it’s not likely to be good based on how we’ve affected the upper layers of the atmosphere in the past.

    • RickFromTexas

      And why is our first thought to destroy or blow up space junk, why don’t we just harvest it and recycle it? Ideas like this come from little men overcompensating for how nature shortchanged them in the manhood department. My laser’s bigger! I can just hear ’em now…

SHARE
  • Monty

    And we want to colonise the rest of the universe. We can’t even keep our own planet in shape. What makes anyone think that man will be any different on Mars or elsewhere?

  • RickFromTexas

    Extremely bad idea, space junk is made of exotic metals and materials, where is what’s left after this junk is hit by lasers going to go? That’s right, gravity will attract it into the upper atmosphere where it will interact in unforeseen ways with what’s already there.

    It might wipe out the ozone layer or interact badly with cosmic rays and/or radiation and then the whole planet’s screwed, but the point is no one knows what will happen and it’s not likely to be good based on how we’ve affected the upper layers of the atmosphere in the past.

    • RickFromTexas

      And why is our first thought to destroy or blow up space junk, why don’t we just harvest it and recycle it? Ideas like this come from little men overcompensating for how nature shortchanged them in the manhood department. My laser’s bigger! I can just hear ’em now…

Next Story

Study Reveals Solar Cells Can Retain Most Of Their Power Conversion Efficiency in Near Space

In the study, researchers from China's Peking University sent the devices fixed with PSCs into near space on a high-altitude balloon.

0
solar energy
Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are known for their potential of achieving higher efficiency and low production costs compared to traditional silicon solar cells. Pixabay

Chinese researchers have found that solar cells can retain most of their power conversion efficiency in near space, providing perspectives on the cells’ future application in space.

Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are known for their potential of achieving higher efficiency and low production costs compared to traditional silicon solar cells.

These cells also have great potential for developing the new-generation energy technology for space application, but little research has been done to test the stability of PSCs in the extreme space environment, Xinhua news agency reported.

In the study, researchers from China’s Peking University sent the devices fixed with PSCs into near space on a high-altitude balloon.

energy
These cells also have great potential for developing the new-generation energy technology for space application, but little research has been done to test the stability of PSCs in the extreme space environment, Xinhua news agency reported. Piixabay

The balloon rose to near space at an altitude of 35 km, a region above Earth’s atmosphere where there is only a trace amount of moisture and ozone.

The region, considered to have “air mass zero” contains no atmospheric attenuation of solar radiation and therefore several high-energy particles and radiation, such as neutrons, electrons and gamma rays, originate from the galactic cosmic rays and solar flares.

solar cells
Chinese researchers have found that solar cells can retain most of their power conversion efficiency in near space, providing perspectives on the cells’ future application in space.
Pixabay

Also Read: Know About The Psychologists Team Helping To Prevent Farmers’ Suicides in Parts of Telangana

According to the findings, one type of PSCs used in the study retained more than 95 per cent of its initial power conversion efficiency during the test, the researchers reported in the journal Science China Physics, Mechanics and Astronomy.

They said the study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. (IANS)