Thursday March 21, 2019
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Australian company all set to find answers to India’s air pollution problem

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Photo credit: www. communicatekaro.in
Photo credit: www.greenworldinvestor.com
Photo credit: www.greenworldinvestor.com

By NewsGram Staff Writer

Pollinate Energy,  an Australian company, which is currently providing India’s slums with solar energy now aims to find a solution to the air pollution problem in country’s poorest areas.

ABC news recently reported that the company’s portable solar lamp, which has a port to charge a mobile phone, has replaced kerosene lamps in 8,000 homes. This is an important step towards sustainable development by saving the natural resources.

The company official added that indoor air pollution from kerosene lamps and stoves are the second leading cause of deaths in India, making the Australian lamp a potential game changer.

Pollinate Energy has employed local citizens to sell solar lights, which costs around 30 Australian Dollars (AUD).

Pollinate Energy co-founder Kat Kimmorley said, “Bangalore, the city that we started in, was the first city in India to become electrified over 100 years ago and yet still in Bangalore it is only 70-80 per cent electrified.”

The new light has allowed children to study with light and improved quality family and community time has also been reported.

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)