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Australian Man Jacob Welsh from Geelong, Melbourne raises $4,000 to bring stray dog home from Greece

Welsh said he and Chance became inseparable after he found her lying in a pile of broken glass on the side of a busy road in Greece

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Jacob Welsh with the dog. Image source: Facebook

Melbourne, Sept 6, 2016: An Australian man Jacob Welsh has raised $4,000 to bring a stray dog home from Greece.

Welsh is from Geelong, 75 km from Melbourne, raised the money on a popular crowd-funding Website, to bring the dog, which he named “Chance,” back to Australia, Xinhua news agency reported on Tuesday.

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The resounding success of the campaign guaranteed Chance would have a home for the rest of her life, said Welsh.

“Thank you! She will not spend another night on the street thanks to all the help we’ve received,” Welsh wrote on social media on Tuesday.

Welsh said he and Chance became inseparable after he found her lying in a pile of broken glass on the side of a busy road in Greece.

“I called her over to me and she hesitantly approached, I gave her a little pat and ever since then she has followed me wherever I go,” he wrote on social media earlier.

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“I didn’t have the heart to leave her on the street after that so since then I have been sneaking her into my apartment, which has a strict no-pets policy.

“The sad reality of her going back on the streets is becoming more and more real as my time left in Greece comes to an end.

“Australia’s laws are very strict with this kind of thing but I have done the research and it is possible, just very expensive. If you can spare a few dollars Chance and I would really appreciate it.”

Costs involved in bringing an animal into Australia include a rabies vaccine, pet passport, plane tickets, airport transfers, de-worming medication and a pet carrier box. (IANS)

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Owning a Dog may help Older Adults to be more Active: Study

The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking

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Owning a dog may help older adults meet physical activity levels. Wikimedia
  • The study highlighted that pet ownership may help older people achieve higher levels of physical activity
  • The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking
  • Dog owners had fewer sedentary events in compared to non-dog owners

London June 9, 2017: Owning a dog may help older adults meet physical activity levels recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) of at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity, researchers suggest.

The study showed that dog owners aged 65 and over spent on average an additional 22 minutes walking, taking an extra 2,760 steps per day when compared to people who didn’t own a dog.

“Over the course of a week this additional time spent walking may in itself be sufficient to meet WHO recommendations of at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity,” said lead author Philippa Dall, doctoral student at Glasgow Caledonian University in Scotland.

Further, dog owners had fewer sedentary events — continuous periods of sitting down — than non-dog owners.

“Our results indicate that dog ownership may play an important role in encouraging older adults to walk more,” added Nancy Gee from WALTHAM Centre for Pet Nutrition — a Britain-based research organisation.

For the study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, the team used data on patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in 43 dog owners and 43 controls, aged 65 years and over.

The researchers monitored the time spent walking moderately, time spent standing, total time spent sitting, as well as the number of times people sat down and how long they sat down for.

The study highlighted that pet ownership may help older people achieve higher levels of physical activity or maintain their physical activity levels for a longer period of time, which could improve their prospects for a better quality of life, improved or maintained cognition, and perhaps, even overall longevity. (IANS)

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Impact Guru and GlobalGiving team up to scale Crowdfunding in India

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An old person treated in hospital in India (representational Image), VOA

New Delhi, May 2, 2017: Impact Guru, India’s leading crowdfunding platform for NGOs, medical and personal causes has entered into a strategic partnership with US and UK based GlobalGiving, the world’s first and largest non-profit crowdfunding platform.

This partnership will enable vetted Indian NGOs and social enterprises raising money on www.impactguru.com to offer tax benefits to international donors in US and UK, particularly NRIs (Non-Resident Indians) / PIOs (People of Indian Origin) when they donate towards social causes using GlobalGiving’s technology on the Impact Guru platform.

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India is home to the highest number of nonprofits in the world (33 lakh NGOs) and raises more than Rs. 8,500 crore annually from international donors. Tax incentives are often considered a crucial factor in encouraging philanthropy. By offering tax exemptions to US and UK donors, this partnership will help Indian NGOs and social enterprises to attract more philanthropy or grant capital from the Indian diaspora.

The Indian government estimates that there are more than 60 lakh NRIs / PIOs residing in the US and UK. According to a research report by The Bridgespan Group, if the charitable contributions of the Indian diaspora in the US were consistent with those of other American households in similar income brackets, and they directed 40 percent of their philanthropy to India, Rs. 8000 crore additional funds could flow from such donors towards Indian social causes per year.

International donors can be rest assured about the transparency and authenticity of the participating organisations as all participants will need to go through an intermediary facilitating the process of due diligence or should have been vetted in the past by one.

Social enterprises based in India are also eligible to either fundraise online or route their grants via Impact Guru. Beyond India, this partnership will also enable nonprofits and social enterprises across Southeast Asia (including Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia) to raise funds via Impact Guru.

“Having spent over a decade outside of India prior to starting Impact Guru, we can relate to the desire of Indian diaspora to give back while obtaining local tax benefits, and their concerns around transparency of Indian NGOs. Impact Guru is thrilled to be partnering with GlobalGiving to address these gaps, thereby making us the platform of choice for crowd funding by Indians globally,” said co-founder and CEO Piyush Jain, Impact Guru’s.

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“GlobalGiving is excited to partner with Impact Guru to help Indian NGOs transact with donors in India, the US and the UK on a single giving platform. This partnership will help GlobalGiving, Impact Guru and the global social sector to understand more about how donors and NGOs interact locally and globally,” said GlobalGiving’s Spokesperson, John Hecklinger, Chief Network Officer.

In the past, Impact Guru has executed a successful partnership with Fundnel, a Singapore based private investment platform. This collaboration strengthened the Indian platform’s presence in Southeast Asia. Since 2016, Impact Guru and Fundnel have helped mobilize over Rs. 329 crore for various projects across 15 countries.

Impact Guru was also recently chosen as the official crowd funding partner of Project Inspire, an initiative by Singapore Committee for UN Women and MasterCard that focused on creating a better world for women and girls in Asia Pacific. It raised approximately Rs. 25 lakhs from more than 1,100 supporters from over 30 countries in less than a month. (ANI)

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Feeling homesick? Go for Animal-assisted Therapy to lead a satisfactory Life!

The participants who took eight weeks of dog therapy experienced significant reductions in homesickness and a greater increase in satisfaction with life

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Dog Therapy. Image source: Wikimedia Commons
  • According to a research, Animal-assisted therapy may help first-year college students overcome homesickness and may help lower drop-out rates
  • The therapy includes 45-minute weekly sessions involving small group interactions with dogs and their handlers, and engagement with fellow students from the study
  • In a 2009 report conducted for B.C. Stats, 29 percent students who wanted to drop out, decided to stay

Toronto, Sept 09, 2016: Animal-assisted therapy can help first-year university students combat homesickness and could also be a useful tool in lowering drop-out rates, finds an interesting research.

Homesick students are three times more likely than those who manage their homesickness to disengage and drop out of university, the researchers said.

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“Transitioning from high school to university can prove to be a challenge for many first-year students,” said John Tyler Binfet, Assistant Professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Okanagan, Canada.

In the study, the participants who completed eight weeks of dog therapy experienced significant reductions in homesickness and a greater increase in satisfaction with life.

Participants reported that sessions “felt like they were at home chatting with friends who brought their puppies.”

But the non-treatment group reported an increase in their feelings of homesickness, the study said.

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Dog therapy included 45-minute weekly sessions involving small group interactions with dogs and handlers, and engagement with other first-year students participating in the study.

For the study, published in the journal Anthrozoos, 44 first year university students who self-identified as homesick were given a survey to measure levels of homesickness, satisfaction with life and connectedness with the campus.

Half of the students completed eight weeks of dog therapy, while the other half were informed that their sessions would begin in eight weeks’ time.

A total of 29 per cent of students who dropped out cited more interactions and friendships with other students as a factor that would have influenced their decision to stay longer, according to a 2009 report conducted for B.C. Stats — the statistics agency for British Columbia in Canada.

“Moving to a new city, I did not know anyone at the university and became very homesick and depressed. I was mainly secluded in my dorm room and did not feel like I belonged here. Coming to animal assisted therapy sessions every Friday gave me a sense of purpose and kept me enthusiastic about life,” stated Varenka Kim, a student at UBC Okanagan. (IANS)