Tuesday January 21, 2020
Home Lead Story Auto History ...

Auto History Museum to Add First Self-Driving Test Vehicles

The GM-donated vehicle originally made its debut testing on the streets of San Francisco in 2016

0
//
auto museum
FILE - Several Chevrolet Bolt EV vehicles are shown during a tour of the General Motors Orion Assembly plant in Orion Township, Michigan, Nov. 4, 2016. VOA

One of General Motors’ first self-driving test vehicles is going on display at an automotive history museum in suburban Detroit.

The Henry Ford history attraction announced Tuesday that it has acquired a modified pre-production Chevrolet Bolt electric vehicle.

auto museum
FILE – In this Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, General Motors Chairman and CEO Mary Barra speaks next to a autonomous Chevrolet Bolt electric car, in Detroit. VOA

The GM-donated vehicle originally made its debut testing on the streets of San Francisco in 2016. Now it will be displayed at the Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation in Dearborn.

The camera- and sensor-equipped vehicle is the first autonomous car to be added to The Henry Ford collection. It’ll be next to a 1959 Cadillac El Dorado at the “Driving America” exhibit, which chronicles the history of the automobile.

ALSO READ: School Students Set to March for Global Climate Change Strike

The Henry Ford President and CEO Patricia Mooradian says self-driving capabilities “will fundamentally change our relationship with the automobile.” She says the acquisition “is paramount in how we tell that story.” (VOA)

Next Story

Here’s How You Can Enjoy Gaming in Autonomous Vehicles

Self-driving cars have many intelligent technologies that help to keep them safe, and the researchers envision that in the future

0
Autonomous Vehicles
The VR driving simulator is designed as a framework to enable rapid prototyping of in-car Autonomous Vehicles game that leverage future technologies like V2V, full window HUDs, head tracking, and different input methods. Pixabay

Researchers have designed multiplayer games where occupants of Autonomous Vehicles can play with other players in self-driving cars within near distance.

The study, led by researchers from the University of Waterloo in Canada, details three games created for level three and higher semi-autonomous vehicles.

The researchers also made suggestions for many exciting types of in-car games for future exploration.

Level three and higher semi-autonomous vehicles are those that have, at minimum, environmental detection capabilities and can make informed decisions for themselves.

“As autonomous vehicles start to replace conventional vehicles, occupants will have much more free time than they used to,” said study researcher Matthew Lakier.

“You will be able to play games with other people in autonomous vehicles nearby when the car is driving itself. The games will be imposed on top of the actual world, so drivers won’t have to take their eyes off the road, ” Lakier added.

Self-driving cars have many intelligent technologies that help to keep them safe, and the researchers envision that in the future, vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication and heads-up displays (HUDs) will also become standard features.

V2V enables cars to let each other know where they are relative to each other on the road, and HUDs on the windshield keep drivers aware of the car’s speed and road conditions.

In developing the three games, the researchers first undertook an extensive literature review to identify gaps in previous research done about autonomous vehicles and found that not much attention has been given to cross-car games.

They then developed a virtual reality (VR) driving simulator to render the car cabin, outside environment, and roadway with artificially controlled cars and intelligent computer-controlled players.

Autonomous Vehicles
Researchers have designed multiplayer games where occupants of Autonomous Vehicles can play with other players in self-driving cars within near distance. Pixabay

The VR driving simulator is designed as a framework to enable rapid prototyping of in-car games that leverage future technologies like V2V, full window HUDs, head tracking, and different input methods.

Twelve participants evaluated the three cross-car games.

They played the games, with occasional take-over tasks, completed the Player Experience Inventory questionnaire to measure player experience, and answered questions in a semi-structured interview.

ALSO READ: AI Can Give More Accurate Results for Cardiac MRI

“Overall, the participants rated the games highly in immersion, there was a positive response to the incorporation of HUDs in the games, and the different game styles did not significantly impact the take-over task completion time. All games were popular for different reasons,” said Lakier.

The study was presented at the Annual Symposium on Computer-Human Interaction in Play. (IANS)