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Nepal gets its own Aviation Museum ; Pilot in Nepal transforms crashed Turkish Airlines plane into a Museum

Through his small attempt, Captain Upreti hopes to inspire young minds to join the aviation industry and believes the museum will not only serve as a recreational spot, but also as an educational centre for students and aviation enthusiasts

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An image of the Aviation Museum as shared by Captain Bed Upreti
An image of the Aviation Museum as shared by Captain Bed Upreti on his Facebook account. Facebook
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If you think that an old, dysfunctional airplane after a crash belongs only to the scrap then you are mistaken. A lot of redundant airplanes begin an alternate phase of life on the ground. And Turkish Airlines’ Airbus A330 is no different.

In March 2015, a Turkish Airlines’ airplane had crash-landed at the Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu after it had attempted to land amidst dense fog. With 224 passengers on board, Airbus A330 had nosedived on the runway and came to an abrupt stop.

While there were no casualties reported, the unfortunate mishap completely shut Nepal’s only international airport for over four days as the technicians struggled to move the plane from the tarmac.

As international air traffic suffered, the airplane was finally moved to a dysfunctional corner of the airport where the craft was left to rust for almost two years until pilot Bed Upreti came up with an idea.

A new Aviation Museum will soon be functional in Sinamangal in Nepal, housed inside the abandoned Turkish Airlines’ Airbus A330.

The Transformation

According to a report by AFP, pilot Bed Upreti has invested $600,000 to convert the rusting metal carcass into an aviation museum, the first of its kind in Nepal.

The first step in the line of action was to move the 63-metre airplane from the airport to the land plot that has been deputed for the establishment of the Aviation Museum.

A special team of engineers and technicians from Turkey worked on the airplane for over six weeks to dismantle the entire craft into pieces. It was then loaded onto trucks for the 500-meter journey to the other side of the road.

ALSO READ Soon, Andhra Pradesh to get an Aviation City with US help

If that was not enough, the team utilized another two months to put the pieces back together to compose one whole.

All these tasks were strictly undertaken during the night when the airport was closed, in order to sustain air traffic during the day.

The Inside of the Plane

The inside of the plane has been completely stripped off of seats to make space for visitors to move freely.

According to AFP report, the business class section of the airplane will have a model of the Wright Brothers’ first aircraft on display, which was the first machine to touch the sky. The report also entails that the tail of the airplane at the rear will have a café for the visitors.

The Aviation Museum in Sinamangal will have more than 150 miniature models of airplanes tracing the history of aviation on display. For the amused visitors, the museum will also tell the story of Nepal’s aviation industry.

Additionally, Captain Upreti had shared in a previous report to a leading portal that the museum will comprise simulators for pilots and also present a documentary highlighting the construction, and evolution of aircraft, along with an aerial photo gallery for aviation enthusiasts and visitors alike.

The Man Behind the Project: Captain Bed Upreti

Captain Bed Upreti is a commercial pilot who has experience of flying over India, Nepal, Indonesia, Malaysia and several other countries for more than 30 years.

Captain Upreti has also authored over a dozen books which include one of Nepal’s best sellers ‘Everest from the air’.

Bed Upreti had previously bought a forsaken Fokker 100, which is half the size of an Airbus A330 and had transformed it into an Aircraft museum in Dhanagadi, Nepal. However, that was much smaller in size than the new Aviation Museum that will soon be ready for the public.

aviation museum
Captain Bed Upreti. Facebook

Nepal, being a small nation, has an impoverished economy with a large mass of people who may never be able to afford the airfare. The Aviation Museum will serve as an easy access for them to experience what it is like to step inside a plane.

AFP quoted Shyan Rauniyar, an engineering student part of the team working on the replica of the Wright Brothers’ plane as saying, “It (the museum) will give a chance to some Nepalis who might never fly to step into a plane.”

The new aviation museum will represent the dreams of Nepal and its people. Through his small attempt, Captain Upreti hopes to inspire young minds to join the aviation industry and believes the Aviation Museum will not only serve as a recreational spot, but also as an educational center for students and aviation enthusiasts.

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Wearing helmet may reduce spine injury risk during crash

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Wear helmets to reduce spine injuries. Wikimedia Commons
Wear helmets to reduce spine injuries. Wikimedia Commons
  • Helmets may prevent serious spine injury risks
  • Cervical spine fractures were found more often in patients who were not wearing helmets
  • Helmets need to be necessary for riding two-wheelers

Helmet usage while riding a motorcycle lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particular fractures of the cervical vertebrae, a new study has found.

Helmets are important for road safety. www.livelaw.in
Helmets are important for road safety. www.livelaw.in

Major reasons cited for not requiring helmets while riding a motorcycle include freedom of choice, avoiding any limitation on vision and a perceived increased risk of receiving a CSI.

The last reason is based on the belief that the added weight of a helmet might increase torque on the cervical spine, the researcher said. “Our study suggests that wearing a motorcycle helmet is a reasonable way to limit the risk of injury to the cervical spine in a motorcycle crash,” said Nathaniel P. Brooks, MD at the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison, in the US.

According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) estimates, wearing helmets saved the lives of 1,859 motorcycle riders in 2016; an additional 802 lives could have been saved if every motorcyclist had worn them.

Also Read: Government to launch road safety policy: Modi

For the study, published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, researchers reviewed the charts of 1,061 patients who had been injured in motorcycle crashes and treated at a single Level 1 trauma centre in Wisconsin between the year 2010 to 2015.

Of those patients, 323 (30.4 percent) were wearing helmets at the time of the crash and 738 (69.6 percent) were not, as Wisconsin law does not require all riders to wear a helmet. At least one CSI was sustained by 7.4 percent of the riders wearing a helmet and 15.4 percent of those not wearing one.

Road accidents in India
Wearing helmets can reduce risk of spinal injuries during accidents. Pixabay

Cervical spine fractures occurred more often in patients who were not wearing helmets (10.8 percent compared to 4.6per cent), as did ligament injuries (1.9 percent compared with 0.3 percent); again these differences are statistically significant, the researchers said.

There were no significant differences between groups (helmeted vs. unhelmeted riders) with respect to other types of cervical spine injuries that were sustained: nerve root injury, cervical strain, or cord contusion. IANS