Monday July 22, 2019
Home Lead Story To Avoid Copy...

To Avoid Copyright Violations Youtubers Try Funny Ways to Make Videos

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now

0
//
youtube PiP
Users who don't have a YouTube Premium subscription can play a video (non-music one) then exit the app and see if it stops or goes into PiP mode. Pixabay

In an attempt to combat copyright-related issues on YouTube, creators have started adding self-sung songs behind funny clips they wish to shoot a reaction video on.

Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen.

Recently, several YouTubers have landed in copyright violations by picking up short clips from platforms like TikTok that contained music from labels like Sony and Warner.

“To work around that, creators like Danny Gonzalez and Kurtis Conner have started replacing the music with their own singing, half-heartedly singing famous songs while the corresponding TikTok video plays on screen,” The Verge reported on Sunday.

Youtube
Reaction videos, typically monetised, are a huge part of the current YouTube culture where people lift clips and trailers and film their reactions to what is happening on-screen. Pixabay

Creators have devised the humorous method so that major labels would not be able to claim copyright infringement, or at least that the singing would not trigger YouTube’s automated system for finding copyrighted content.

ALSO READ: Motorola Fails to Cement its Position in India

However, the issue remains that YouTube content creators are still trying out ways to monetise videos that include content they did not create themselves.

“It’s a little painful to hear, but ultimately a very fun loophole in the copyright system that YouTube has to enforce,” the report added.

There has not been any comment on the subject from Google or YouTube as of now.  (IANS)

Next Story

YouTube Fined in Millions Over Kids’ Data Privacy Breach

To combat such repetitive issues, especially involving kids’ privacy, the platform is considering putting all the content for children on the YouTube Kids app that was launched in 2015

0
youtube, virtual makeup
FILE - Silhouettes are seen in front of a Youtube logo, in this picture illustration taken in Zenica, Oct. 29, 2014. VOA

Google has reportedly reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over alleged violations of children’s data privacy laws on its content sharing app YouTube.

The settlement comes after an FTC investigation found that Google improperly collected children’s data which is a breach of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, CNET reported on Friday.

However, the Department of Justice has yet to sign off on the details of the fine, hence the exact amount YouTube would lose in the settlement remains unknown.

Earlier in June it was reported that Google could face fines from a late-stage investigation by the federal government into YouTube’s handling of children’s videos, after which the platform said it was considering significant changes to protect its youngest content creators and viewers.

youtube
FILE – Signage is seen inside the YouTube Space LA offices in Los Angeles, California, Oct. 21, 2015. VOA

One of the US Senators, Ed Markey, had also sent a letter to the FTC asking the commission to “hold YouTube accountable for any illegal activity affecting children that the company may have committed”.

In addition to the already existing enquiries on YouTube, the Centre for Digital Democracy and the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood also approached the FTC suggesting penalties for the video streaming giant.

Also Read: Micro-blogging Platform Twitter to Soon Explain Why Certain Tweets are Unavailable

They recommended all children’s data be deleted, civil penalties, plus “a $100 million fund to be used to support the production of non-commercial, high-quality and diverse content for children”, the report noted.

To combat such repetitive issues, especially involving kids’ privacy, the platform is considering putting all the content for children on the YouTube Kids app that was launched in 2015. (IANS)