Thursday August 22, 2019

Avoid Obesity in Later Life by Eating More Plant-Diet

If you want to stay away from obesity in later life, then start eating more plant-based foods as researchers say consumption of even mild vegetarian diet may reduce the risk of obesity in long term.

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"The consumption of organic food added even more environmental benefits for a plant-based diet," Seconda said. Wikimedia Commons

If you want to stay away from obesity in later life, then start eating more plant-based foods as researchers say consumption of even mild vegetarian diet may reduce the risk of obesity in long term.

A study showed that people with higher scores on the plant-based diet index had a lower body mass index (BMI) over the long term. It also reported that in order to guard against obesity, one does not need to eliminate meat-based food entirely from diet.

“Our study suggests that a more plant-based and less animal-based diet beyond strict adherence to vegan or vegetarian diets may be beneficial for preventing overweight/ obesity in middle-aged and elderly populations,” said Zhangling Chen from Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

“Eating a plant-based diet to protect against obesity does not require a radical change in diet or a total elimination of meat or animal products. Instead, it can be achieved in various ways, such as moderate reduction of red meat consumption or eating a few more vegetables.

“This supports current recommendations to shift to diets rich in plant foods, with low in consumption of animal foods,” Chen explained.

The study, presented during European Congress on Obesity (ECO2018) in Austria, included data from 9,641 middle-aged and elderly adults of average age of 62 years.

vegetables and fruits.
A well stocked stand of vegetables and fruits. VOA

The results showed that people with higher plant-based diet scores had lower BMI in long term mainly due to lower body fat mass, after adjusting for the effects of time of repeated measurements, total energy intake, education, socioeconomic background and physical activity levels.

Also Read: Consumption of Raw Fruits And Veggies Boost Mental Health

These associations were stronger in middle-aged participants (45-65 years) than elderly (older than 65 years). (IANS)

Next Story

Heart Disease, Stroke-related Deaths on Rise Due to Obesity: Study

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes

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obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

Heart disease and stroke mortality rates have almost stopped declining in many high-income countries and are even increasing in some countries, reveals a new study.

For the study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, researchers from the University of Melbourne analysed trends in cardiovascular disease mortality, which consists of mainly heart disease and stroke — in 23 high-income countries since the year 2000.

The study found that cardiovascular disease mortality rates for people aged 35 to 74 years are now barely declining, or are increasing, in 12 of the 23 countries.

Cardiovascular disease mortality rates have increased in the most recent years in US and Canadian females, while in Australia, the UK and New Zealand annual declines in deaths from cardiovascular diseases are now 20 to 50 per cent.

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Two women converse in New York, June 26, 2012. The nation’s obesity epidemic continues to grow, led by an alarming increase among women. Obesity is one of the risk factors of heart failure. VOA

“Research suggests that obesity, or at least poor diet, may have been a significant contributor to the slowdown in the decline of cardiovascular disease deaths,” said Alan Lopez, Professor at the University of Melbourne.

“Each of these countries have very high levels of obesity. In Australia, close to one-third of adults are obese,” Lopez said.

Also Read: Google Fit Can Now Track Users’ Sleep Patterns

The researchers observed that obesity is the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease mortality — others include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

“Failure to address these issues could confirm the end of the long-term decline in cardiovascular disease deaths and threaten future gains in life expectancy.” concluded study’s co-author Tim Adair, a researcher at the varsity. (IANS)