Saturday February 16, 2019

Avoid Obesity in Later Life by Eating More Plant-Diet

If you want to stay away from obesity in later life, then start eating more plant-based foods as researchers say consumption of even mild vegetarian diet may reduce the risk of obesity in long term.

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"The consumption of organic food added even more environmental benefits for a plant-based diet," Seconda said. Wikimedia Commons

If you want to stay away from obesity in later life, then start eating more plant-based foods as researchers say consumption of even mild vegetarian diet may reduce the risk of obesity in long term.

A study showed that people with higher scores on the plant-based diet index had a lower body mass index (BMI) over the long term. It also reported that in order to guard against obesity, one does not need to eliminate meat-based food entirely from diet.

“Our study suggests that a more plant-based and less animal-based diet beyond strict adherence to vegan or vegetarian diets may be beneficial for preventing overweight/ obesity in middle-aged and elderly populations,” said Zhangling Chen from Erasmus University in Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons
The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition, also found that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets. Wikimedia Commons

“Eating a plant-based diet to protect against obesity does not require a radical change in diet or a total elimination of meat or animal products. Instead, it can be achieved in various ways, such as moderate reduction of red meat consumption or eating a few more vegetables.

“This supports current recommendations to shift to diets rich in plant foods, with low in consumption of animal foods,” Chen explained.

The study, presented during European Congress on Obesity (ECO2018) in Austria, included data from 9,641 middle-aged and elderly adults of average age of 62 years.

vegetables and fruits.
A well stocked stand of vegetables and fruits. VOA

The results showed that people with higher plant-based diet scores had lower BMI in long term mainly due to lower body fat mass, after adjusting for the effects of time of repeated measurements, total energy intake, education, socioeconomic background and physical activity levels.

Also Read: Consumption of Raw Fruits And Veggies Boost Mental Health

These associations were stronger in middle-aged participants (45-65 years) than elderly (older than 65 years). (IANS)

Next Story

As Per Study, High-Risk HPV Lead to Increased CVD

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD.

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Obesity leads to high CVB in women.
women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD. Pixabay

While human papillomavirus (HPV) have been linked to cancer, infection with high-risk strains of the virus might also increase the fear of cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially among women with obesity or other cardiovascular problems, according to a new research.

Certain strains of HPV are considered high risk because they can increase the probability of vaginal, vulvar, penile, mouth, throat and cervical cancers.

The study showed that women with high-risk HPV were 22 per cent more likely than uninfected women to develop cardiovascular disease.

High risk HPV contributes to CVD problems.
HPV are considered high risk as they develop CVD disease. Pixabay

In addition, women with obesity were nearly two-thirds more likely to develop CVD and those with metabolic syndrome and high-risk HPV were nearly twice as likely to develop the disorder, showed results published in Circulation Research: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Conversely, slightly more than 7 per cent of the women without CVD developed high-risk HPV infections.

Interestingly, women who smoked, consumed alcohol and reported being physically active were also more likely to have high-risk HPV. In contrast, higher education – college degree or more – was associated with a decreased likelihood of having high-risk HPV.

 

Fear of increased CVD disease is higher in obese women.
Women with obesity faces higher chances of CVD disease. Pixabay

“A better understanding of high-risk HPV as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and possible combined effects of high-risk HPV, obesity and metabolic syndrome in increasing cardiovascular disease risk may help improve preventive strategies and patient outcomes,” said Seungho Ryu, Professor at Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea.

Further studies are required to identify specific high-risk HPV genotypes that may contribute to cardiovascular disease and to examine whether vaccine strategies to reduce high-risk HPV infection for cancer prevention may also help reduce CVD, suggested the study.

ALSO READ: Keep Obesity At Bay With Flaxseeds

For the study, researchers included 63,411 women aged 30 or older without CVD. (IANS)