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Actor Ayushmann Khurrana Comes in Support of #MeToo Movement

The #MeToo movement gained momentum in India after actress Tanushree Dutta accused veteran actor Nana Patekar of harassment

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Ayushmann Khurrana
Men should understand what consent is: Ayushmann. (Wikimedia Commons)
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Actor Ayushmann Khurrana has supported the #MeToo movement by saying that men should understand what consent is.

Ayushmann visited the PVR Citi Mall here on Saturday to know the audience’s reaction for his latest film “Badhaai Ho”.

Reacting to the #MeToo campaign that has gathered momentum in India, especially in Bollywood, Ayushmann told media: “The #MeToo movement is a good movement, but at the same time, I feel both parties should be given equal opportunities to share their account and to prove their innocence. Having said that, I feel women should be respected and they shouldn’t be harassed.

“There should be stringent rules at every workplace. It is not only about workplace, but I think that the code of conduct should be followed in every sphere of society, be it our family or where we live.”

Union Women and Child Development Minister Maneka Gandhi has announced the formation of a committee of four retired judges and a lawyer to examine all issues emanating from #MeToo, a movement against sexual harassment.

Ayushmann Khurrana
Ayushmann Khurrana. (Wikimedia Commons)

Actors like Aamir Khan, Akshay Kumar and Hrithik Roshan have also taken a firm stand against their colleagues, who have been accused in sexual harassment cases.

Asked whether these kind of measures are necessary to curb harassment at workplace, Ayushmann said: “I think we should have taken these measures long time ago, but whatever measures we have taken are absolutely correct.

“Women should feel safe whether it’s in journalism or sometimes we go to shoot, our films are in outdoor locations. We shoot there till late nights and not a single woman should feel unsafe there and men should understand what consent is and without that, you cannot do anything to anyone.

You May Also Like to Read About- Swara Bhaskar Feels That Social Media Must Have Civil Conduct

“No one can touch other person without his or her consent and if anyone does that, then strict action should be taken against that individual.”

The #MeToo movement gained momentum in India after actress Tanushree Dutta accused veteran actor Nana Patekar of harassment. (IANS)

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Do More to Create Equality: Women Leaders In Tech During Web Summit

Google's head of philanthropy, Jacquelline Fuller, said she joined the walkout last week, admitting more needs to be done.

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Google, Web summit
The center stage at Web Summit, Europe's biggest tech conference, in Lisbon, Portugal. VOA

Women leaders in technology called at one of the sector’s largest global conferences, Web Summit for more to be done to drive equality in the male-dominated industry now hit by the #MeToo debate.

The ninth Web Summit comes amid growing concerns about sexism in the tech world, with thousands of Google employees walking out last week to protest the company’s response to sexual misconduct and workplace inequality.

In a poll of 1,000 women leaders in tech by the Web Summit, given exclusively to the Thomson Reuters Foundation, 47 percent said the gender ratio in leadership had not improved in the past year. Only 17 percent said it was better.

Stephen Hawking, web summit
FILE- Cosmologist Stephen Hawking delivers a video message during the inauguration of Web Summit, Europe’s biggest tech conference, in Lisbon, Portugal, Nov. 6, 2017. (VOA)

 

Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president for environment, policy and social initiatives, said it was crucial to have more women in the sector.

“We can’t accomplish what we need if women [aren’t involved] in tech,” Jackson, who was part of President Barack Obama’s administration, told the Web Summit in Lisbon.

About 70,000 people from 170 nations were at the conference, where the number of women attendees has risen to about 45 percent from 25 percent in 2013, helped by discounting tickets, according to organizers. They did not have earlier figures.

Talking about expertise

“This year a lot of the talks on our stages are touching on the [number of women in the sector],” Anna O’Hare, head of content at Web Summit, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “But rather than women just talking about this, they are talking about the areas in which they are experts in tech.”

The tech sector has long come under scrutiny for inequality and its “bro-gamer” type of culture, referring to men who play video games.

Global organizations, including the United Nations and the European Commission, have spoken out about under-representation of women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Facebook, Web Summit
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg testifies before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on foreign influence operations and their use of social media on Capitol Hill. VOA

A 2016 report by the global consultancy McKinsey found women made up 37 percent of entry-level roles in technology but only 25 percent reached senior management roles and 15 percent made executive level.

The poll of women at the Web Summit found eight of every 10 women felt confident and respected in their roles, but they were divided when asked if they were treated the same as men, with 60 percent saying they were under more pressure to prove themselves.

Thirty-seven percent worried that women were offered leadership roles only to fill quotas.

While half of the women polled said their companies were doing enough to ensure equality, nearly 60 percent said governments were not active enough to address the imbalance.

Several tech company representatives have told the Web Summit of attempts to boost equality, with moves such as training staff in unconscious bias, deleting gender from CVs, ensuring that all short lists have women and improving maternity rights.

Google, Web summit
Google employees fill Harry Bridges Plaza in front of the Ferry Building during a walkout, Nov. 1, 2018, in San Francisco. Hundreds of Google employees around the world briefly walked off the job in a protest against what they said is the tech company’s mishandling of sexual misconduct allegations against executives. VOA

Better results

Gillian Tans, chief executive at the online travel agent Booking.com, said it had been proven that companies with “more women in management positions actually perform better.”

Also Read: Silicon Valley, Google Walk Off To Protest Against Mishandling Of Sexual Harassment Cases

This comes after organizers of the Google protest and other staff said the company’s executives, like leaders at dozens of companies affected by the #MeToo movement, were slow to address structural issues such as unchecked power of male bosses.

Google’s head of philanthropy, Jacquelline Fuller, said she joined the walkout last week, admitting more needs to be done.

“We need to do a better job at creating a safe and inclusive workplace,” she said. “We need more women in tech.” (VOA)