Tuesday January 28, 2020

Babies already have a Sense of what Counting Means: Study

For the study, published in the journal Developmental Science, the researchers worked with 14 and 18-month-old infants

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Babies
Research like ours shows that Babies actually have a pretty sophisticated understanding of the world -- they're already trying to make sense of what adults around them are saying, and that includes this domain of counting and numbers. Pixabay

Babies who are years away from being able to say ‘one’, ‘two’, and ‘three’ actually already have a sense of what counting means, said a new study.

“Research like ours shows that babies actually have a pretty sophisticated understanding of the world — they’re already trying to make sense of what adults around them are saying, and that includes this domain of counting and numbers,” said the study’s senior author Lisa Feigenson from the Johns Hopkins University in the US.

For the study, published in the journal Developmental Science, the researchers worked with 14 and 18-month-old infants.

The babies watched as toys, little dogs or cars, were hidden in a box that they couldn’t see inside of, but could reach into.

Sometimes the researchers counted each toy aloud as they dropped them into the box, saying, ‘Look! One, two, three, four — four dogs!’ Other times the researchers simply dropped each toy into the box, saying, ‘This, this, this and this — these dogs’.

Without counting, the babies had a hard time remembering that the box held four things.

They tended to become distracted after the researchers pulled just one out — as if there was nothing else to see. But when the toys were counted, the babies clearly expected more than one to be pulled from the box.

Babies
Babies who are years away from being able to say ‘one’, ‘two’, and ‘three’ actually already have a sense of what counting means, said a new study. Pixabay

According to the study, they didn’t remember the exact but they did remember the approximate number.

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“When we counted the toys for the babies before we hid them, the babies were much better at remembering how many toys there were,” said the study’s researcher Jenny Wang, Assistant Professor at the Rutgers University. (IANS)

Next Story

Mothers Find Gaps in Accessibility of Breastfeeding Resources at Work: Research

Mothers still face barriers to breastfeed at work

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breastfeeding
The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers. Pixabay

Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, says a new health research.

The study, published in the journal Workplace Health & Safety also revealed gaps in the quality and accessibility of breastfeeding resources in the eyes of working mothers.

“We know that there are benefits of breastfeeding for both the mother and the infant, and we know that returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation,” said study lead author Rachel McCardel from University of Georgia in US.

“There is a collective experience that we wanted to explore and learn how can we make this better,” McCardel added.

breastfeeding
Returning to work is a significant challenge for breastfeeding continuation. Pixabay

For the findings, research team specifically wanted to better understand breastfeed support in the workplace since US federal guidelines went into place over a decade ago requiring employers to provide unpaid break time and a space other than a restroom for employees to be able to express breast milk.

For their study, the research team surveyed female employees who performed a variety of jobs.

In addition to asking questions about their access to breast feed resources like private rooms, breast pumps and lactation consultants, the respondents were also asked about their experiences with combining breastfeeding and work.

They found that most respondents, nearly 80 per cent, had a private space at work to express milk, and around two-thirds of the women reported having break times to breastfeed.

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Access to other resources like lactation consultants or breast pumps was less common.

According to the study, many respondents also said they hadn’t expected to get much help from their employers, and there was a general lack of communication about the resources available to them. (IANS)