Wednesday November 20, 2019

Bad Breakups May not Trigger Weight Gain, Says Study

"The only thing we found was in the second study, women who already had a proclivity for emotional eating did gain weight after a relationship breakup. But it wasn't common," Harrison added

0
//
breakups
The new survey asked whether participants had ever experienced the dissolution of a long-term relationship, and whether they gained or lost weight as a result.

That pint of ice cream after a nasty breakup may not do as much damage as you think. Despite the emotional turmoil, people on average do not report gaining weight after a relationship dissolution, says a new study.

According to the researchers, it has been well documented that people sometimes use food as a way to cope with negative feelings and that emotional eating can lead to unhealthy food choices.

“…our research showed that while it’s possible people may drown their sorrows in ice cream for a day or two, modern humans do not tend to gain weight after a breakup,” said study author Marissa Harrison, Associate Professor at Penn State University in the US.

Breakups can be stressful and emotional, it could potentially trigger emotional eating.

“Food was much scarcer in the ancestral environment, so if your partner abandoned you, it could have made gathering food much harder,” Harrison added.

Also Read: Facebook Ready to Launch a Dedicated News Tab on its Platform

For the study, published in the Journal of the Evolutionary Studies Consortium, the researchers completed two studies to test the theory that people may be more likely to gain weight after a relationship breakup.

Obesity
An overweight woman sits on a chair in Times Square in New York, May 8, 2012. (Representational image). VOA

In the first one, the researchers recruited 581 people to complete an online survey about whether they had recently gone through a breakup and whether they gained or lost weight within a year of the breakup.

Most of the participants — 62.7 per cent — reported no weight change.

For the second study, the researchers recruited 261 new participants to take a different, more extensive survey than the one used in the first study.

The new survey asked whether participants had ever experienced the dissolution of a long-term relationship, and whether they gained or lost weight as a result.

The survey also asked about participants’ attitudes toward their ex-partner, how committed the relationship was, who initiated the breakup, whether the participants tended to eat emotionally, and how much participants enjoy food in general.

While all participants reported experiencing a break up at some point in their lives, the majority of participants — 65.13 per cent — reported no change in weight after relationship dissolution.

“The only thing we found was in the second study, women who already had a proclivity for emotional eating did gain weight after a relationship breakup. But it wasn’t common,” Harrison added. (IANS)

Next Story

Weight Gain in Mid-20s is Linked to Early Death, Study Says

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk

0
Weight
Weight loss at older ages , Apart from Weight gain (from middle to late adulthood) is also linked to higher risk. Pixabay

Weight Gain from your mid-20s into middle age is associated with an increased risk of premature death, warn researchers.

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk.

“The results highlight the importance of maintaining normal weight across adulthood, especially preventing weight gain in early adulthood, for preventing premature deaths in later life,” said study researchers from China.

For the study, researchers based in China set out to investigate the association between weight changes across adulthood and mortality.

Their findings were based on data from the 1988-94 and 1999-2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative annual survey that includes interviews, physical examinations and blood samples, to gauge the health of the US citizens.

Their analysis included 36,051 people aged 40 years or over with measured body weight and height at the start of the survey (baseline) and recalled weight at young adulthood (25 years old) and middle adulthood (average age 47 years).

Deaths from any cause and specifically from heart diseases were recorded for an average of 12 years, during which time there were 10,500 deaths.

Weight
Weight Gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight. Pixabay

After taking account of potentially influential factors, the researchers found that people who remained obese throughout adult life had the highest risk of mortality, while people who remained overweight throughout adult life had a very modest or no association with mortality.

Weight gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight.

Weight loss over this period was not significantly related to mortality.

ALSO READ: Workout Before Breakfast To Get Fit, Says Study

But as people got older, the association between weight gain and mortality weakened, whereas the association with weight loss from middle to late adulthood became stronger and significant. (IANS)