Sunday December 17, 2017
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Baghuvar: A self sustainable village in MP which is better than metro cities

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By Anurag Paul

Ralegan Siddhi, a village in Maharashtra, often coined as the best village of Modern India and the best example of ‘Gram Swaraj’ (Self Governance) has been the main source of media attention. Anna Hazare is often credited with this change.

There is one more village in Maharashtra, Hivre Bazar, about 45 Kms from Ralegan Siddhi and chances are that you have already heard of it. It is another village, which is  a living example of Gram Swaraj and now a place to be visited for sure if you want to see how a few hundred people can change the destiny of a village by their labor, long term planning and logistics management of natural resources.

But, there is one village which is miles ahead in development and social commitment if we compare it with the work done in Ralegan Siddhi or Hiwre Bazaar by its villagers. Known as Baghuvar, it is the only village in India which has functioned without a Sarpanch since independence, and that too efficiently.

Located in the block Kareli of district Narsinghpur in the state of Madhya Pradesh,  Baghuvar sets an example of an ideal village in modern India. It shows the way how people can love their villages and stop fleeing to cities for employment for a better life.

Baghuvar village has set an example of exemplary development and real Gram Swaraj. It does not have an Anna or a Popat Rao. Every villager of this small habitat is Anna himself.

No Panchayat Election

This is very unique about this village that there has been no Panchayat (Sarpanch) Election since India’s independence (68 years). Initial decisions related to work and development were lead by most respected person of the village called “Bhaiya Ji”. He worked day and night and took some very good decisions about village development. He got support from most of the villagers thus the village followed his shown path. In 2012 he breathed his last but the villagers still follow his dream and keep the village clean.

Effective utilization of government schemes

In this black age of corruption, none of the schemes reach a village in its true spirit and implementation; the money doesn’t reach up to the villagers at all. Hence, the government schemes go unsuccessful. But, in this village none of the government schemes fail because the villagers know how to effectively utilize development funds.

Sewage & Water Harvesting

What is striking at the very first sight once you reach this village is that there is no overflow of sewage in any street of the village, a very rare thing to see even the most developed cities of India. The village has underground sewage lines and the farm ponds have been built to conserve the rain water.

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Exemplary Self Development

Baghuvar boasts of the highest number of Gobar gas plants in the state. It has altogether 51 Gobar gas plants which are used to produce fuel for cooking and lighting the village. There are 35 tractors, 75 sugarcane processing machines, 25 hand pumps and threshers in the village which houses only 1600 people. To keep the village clean, 25 pits have been dug by Gram Panchayat for pouring the filth. These pits are auctioned every year and the money generated is utilized for Panchayat development.

Ghar Ghar Shauchalay

All the houses in Baghuvar have lavatories. There is also a common toilet complex which is made for the use if there is any social gathering in the village. Each locality is unique in cleanliness and decency. Especially, Harijan locality is the best in this regard where people go for a morning walk.

Green Village-Clean Village

Each and every corner of the village is green as if the entire village is a garden! There is no garbage and sanitation problem. People who migrated to nearby cities have started coming back to the village for resettlement.

They are now utilizing their experience, talent and knowledge for village development. When there was no approach road, the youth themselves constructed a three km road in the village. Impressed with their efforts, the government helped them in constructing the cement road which connects the village to the national Highway.

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Strange Rituals: Demon King Ravana is Worshipped on Dussehra

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Effigy of Ravana burns. Dussehra. Wikimedia

Sep 30, 2017: Vijayadashami or Dussehra is celebrated with fervor at the end of Navratri every year. The festival is observed by burning the puppet of King Ravana. While at some places, the celebration of good over evil is celebrated by burning effigy of the demon king, there are some places where Ravana is worshipped on this occasion. It is predisposed amongst the followers that all their wishes come true on this day.

Also Read: Ram and Ravana Have More In Common Than You Think: 5 Traits of the Anti-Hero Ravana That You Must Learn | Dussehra Special

Every year on Dussehra, the 125-year-old Dashanan temple in Shivala area of Kanpur is opened for its devotees. An idol of King Ravana is ornamented, and aarti is performed. Devotees perform religious rituals and light lamps to celebrate the festival. The temple remains closed following the burning of Ravana’s statue.

Dashanan Temple was constructed in 1890 by king Guru Prasad Shukl. The rationale behind the construction of Dashanan temple was Ravana’s adherence towards Lord Shiva.

King Ravana is worshipped at many places in India, for example: In Andhra Pradesh’s Kakinada, a huge shivalinga established by Ravana is revered along with the demon-king. Vidisha, a village in Madhya Pradesh is dedicated to King Ravana. In this village, the first wedding card invitation is sent to Ravana before the commencement of any celebration. Neither the devotees burn dummies of King Ravana, nor do they celebrate Dussehra.

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Crimes Against Women Perpetrate in Every two Minutes: NCRB Analysis

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Father, left and mother, center of the Indian student victim who was fatally gang raped on this day three years back on a moving bus in the Indian capital join others at a candle lit vigil in New Delhi, India, Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2015. VOA
  • Any kind of physical or mental harm towards women is deemed as  “crime against women”
  • Domestic violence is the most dominant crime against women
  • Andhra Pradesh state is the highest to report crimes against women in the period of ten years

Sep 20, 2017: A report released by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) suggests that crimes against women have increased violently in the last ten years with an estimated figure of  2.24 million crimes. The figure is also suggestive of the fact: 26 crimes against women are reported every hour, or one complaint every two minutes, reports IndiaSpend analysis.

The most dominant crime against women with 909,713 cases reported in last decade was ‘cruelty by husbands and relatives’ under section 498‐A of Indian Penal Code (IPC).

‘Assault on women’ booked under section 354 of IPC is the second-most-reported crime against women with 470,556 crimes.

‘Kidnapping and abduction of women’ are the third-most-reported crime with 315,074 crimes, followed by ‘rape’ (243,051), ‘insult to modesty of women’ (104,151) and ‘dowry death’ (80,833).

The NCRB report also listed three heads, namely commit rape (4,234), abetment of suicide of women (3,734) and protection of women from domestic violence (426) under which cases of crime against women have been reported in 2014.

Andhra Pradesh has reported the most crimes against women (263,839) over the past 10 years.

Andhra Pradesh state is the highest (263,839) to report crimes against women in the period of ten years. Crimes reported for insult (35,733) ranks first followed by cruelty by husband relatives (117,458), assault on women with intent to outrage her modesty (51,376) and dowry-related deaths (5,364).

West Bengal (239,760) is second most crime against women state followed by Uttar Pradesh (236,456), Rajasthan (188,928) and Madhya Pradesh (175,593).

Abduction increased up to three folds over the recent years,  with Uttar Pradesh being the worst affected state. Cases rose from 15,750 cases in 2005 to 57,311 cases in 2014.

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram. Twitter @Nainamishr94


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt. 

 

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Hello Foodies ! You Can Spot These 8 Street Foods at Every Nook and Corner in India

Here is a list of delicious street food items, now available everywhere in India

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Delicious Street Food in India. Wikimedia

Sep 02, 2017: Street foods in India is the new trend amongst foodies these days and are indeed delectable to savor. Previously, it was known that street food confined to a particular region. However, nowadays, a south Indian food can be found even in the north of the country and here is why you don’t need to go all the way to Assam to eat momos.

Many street food items have become quite popular throughout. Let’s have a look at these street food items.

Here is a list of delicious street food items, now available everywhere:

Vada Pao

Street Foods
Vada Pao in Delhi. Wikimedia

Vada Pao is the Indian style burger, quite famous in Maharastra. Fried potato dumplings are stuffed inside pao and are coupled with green chili and spicy chutney that add flavor to this Maharashtrian dish.

Chaat

Street Foods
Papri Chaat. Wikimedia

The sweet, tangy, and spicy taste of Aloo tikki, Gol Gappa, bhelpuri, Sevpuri, will tempt you. This is a mouth-watering street food from Uttar Pradesh. It adds extra taste to your buds when garnished with curd and chutney.

Momos

Street Foods
Cabbage Momos. Wikimedia

The white colored steamed snack of North East is getting popular amongst Indians these days. It makes an awesome combo when served with spicy red chutney and hot momos.

Also Read: “Regionality is What Sets Indian Food Apart” from the Cuisines Across the World, says MasterChef Australia Judge Gary Mehigan 

Poha Jalebi

Street Foods
Poha the staple breakfast of India, with Jalebi. Wikimedia

Sweet jalebis served with salty poha is a trademark street food of Madhya Pradesh. Now the combination is a hit amongst people of the country.

Idli Sambhar

Street Foods
Idli-Sambhar-Coconut chutney. Wikimedia

Idli Sambhar is the most popular street food of Tamil Nadu in India. It is a delicious combo of idli, sambhar and coconut chutney.

Chole Bhatura

Street Foods
Chole bhature. Wikimedia

Chole Bhature, a favorite dish of every Indian is chiefly a treat of Punjab.  It is served with green chilies, onions, and chutney.

Dhokla

Street Foods
Gujarati Dhokla (Khaman Dhokla). Wikimedia

The sweet-sour Dhoklas are a specialty of Gujarat state. It is a famous street food baked from the fermented batter of gram flour. This treat is also served with chutney and green chilies.

Pyaz ki Kachori

Street Foods
Rajasthani Pyaz ki Kachori. Wikimedia

Pyaz ki Kachori was originated in Jodhpur city of Rajasthan. The dish is now relished all over India. These crispy and flaky kachoris with onion masala, garnished with sweet tamarind chutney will throb your heart.


NewsGram is a Chicago-based non-profit media organization. We depend upon support from our readers to maintain our objective reporting. Show your support by Donating to NewsGram. Donations to NewsGram are tax-exempt.