Monday July 16, 2018

US President Barack Obama proposes ban on single-use Plastic Bags

Banning the use of plastic bags is a major step to reduce the usage of plastic but not a great impact on the big problem of colossal disposal of plastics on the oceans

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FILE - Plastic trash on the shoreline of cocoa beach in India. VOA
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  • About 4.8 to 12.7 million metric tonnes of plastic end up in the world’s oceans each year
  • Dangerous chemicals are also leeching into the bodies of the marine creatures and harm them hugely
  • A bag ban can be not much helpful considering the huge amount of plastic dumped in the oceans but it is a great step on the project of reducing plastic dump altogether

Sept 18, 2016: President Barack Obama has proposed a ban on single-use plastic bags. This is a major blow in a small but growing fight against the ‘disposable society’ as referred by the environmentalists. At present, only 12 cities or counties in the United States have barred the usage of plastic bags. But those include three of the nation’s largest cities: New York, Los Angeles, Chicago.

If you doubt that this is a real problem, here’s the most sobering statistic you’ll hear today: According to research published in 2015 in the journal Science, “4.8 to 12.7 million metric tons of plastic” end up in the world’s oceans every year.

Here’s a reference point for just how much plastic that is: A Nimitz class super-carrier, the largest warship ever built, weighs a measly 100,000 metric tonnes. Dump 48 of those just offshore, and that equals the low-end estimate of the plastic that is washing into the world’s oceans every year. A lot of this plastic ends up accumulating in circular currents, called gyres, throughout the world’s oceans.

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Think of them as giant whirlpools where all this plastic is spinning toward the centre of the pool. But these trash gyres, which have made headlines over the past few years, aren’t necessarily visible to the naked eye. “Much of the debris is actually small pieces of floating plastic …” NOAA says. “It is possible to sail through the ‘garbage patch’ area and see very little or no debris on the water’s surface.”

One word, plastics

It’s impossible to say just how much of that plastic debris is in the form of bags, but we do know that sea turtles often mistake bags for jellyfish — one of their favourite foods. And all too often the plastic they eat ends up lodging in their digestive systems, which can kill them. But the bigger problem is that plastic of all kinds is incredibly durable and long lasting. The lifespan of plastic is measured in hundreds of years, and if it ends up in landfills, covered by dirt or other garbage, it can be almost immortal.

And even if it does degrade, it does so in a way that causes, even more, problems to the environment. Eventually, larger plastics degrade into what the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) calls microplastics, smaller than 5mm in size.

The research on what all this plastic, big and little, is doing to the environment is still being conducted, but some environmental groups suggest that 100,000 sea creatures are killed every year because they get tangled up in plastic, and an estimated 1 million seabirds die every year of starvation because their stomachs are filled with plastic debris.

NOAA calls these kinds of plastic problems “direct impacts.”

Plastic and what’s in it

Another element of the plastic problem still being researched is what NOAA calls “indirect impacts.” These come from the chemicals that plastics have in them, and the chemicals they absorb as they degrade.

Emma Tonge from NOAA told VOA that plastic “can accumulate pollutants, such as PCBs [polychlorinated biphenyls] up to 100,000 to 1,000,000 times the levels found in sea water.” And while these chemicals were banned in 1971, they’re still floating around.

New research in the past few years suggests these dangerous chemicals are also leeching into the bodies of the fish that eat the plastics. And once in the fish, they can stress and damage the fish, as well as us if we catch and eat them.

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Banning single-use plastic bags won’t come anywhere near solving the problem because of the wide range of plastics — everything from “common domestic material [bags, Styrofoam cups, bottles, balloons] to industrial products [strapping bands, plastic sheeting, hard hats] to lost or discarded fishing gear [nets, buoys, traps, lines],” all of which NOAA says it is finding in the oceans.

But a bag ban would help, and NOAA says the agency is continuing to “support a number of projects across the country that use outreach and education as a means to prevent marine debris.” These programs focus on prevention, or keeping the plastic from getting into the ocean through what NOAA calls “changes that incorporate the three R’s [reduce, reuse, recycle].” It’s a start that could benefit not only the sea life that is steadily ingesting plastic but carnivores like us at the top of the food chain who may be eating contaminated seafood. (VOA)

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  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    ya! plastics should be banned because over use of plastic will lead to over non disposal garbage and to disposal we might harm the natural resources its better to use the renewable resources.

  • Manthra koliyer

    This should be followed all over the world

  • Enakshi

    a great initiative..

  • Ayushi Gaur

    Responsible initiative

  • Kathi Brennan King

    More than 150 cities and counties in California alone have regulated single use bags so the total figure is many more than the 12 cited at the beginning of this article. California has Prop 67 on the November ballot – a referendum brought about by the plastics industry. If it passes, California will be the first state with a statewide law (Hawaii’s law covers the whole state but is county by county). These bags do need to be regulated to stem the tide of single use plastics polluting our open spaces and marine environments.

    • Deborah SG

      Cambridge, Mass.; Brookline, Mass. (which has banned single-use plastic bags and styrofoam cups and containers).

  • Arya Sharan

    Plastic ban is a good initiative but something needs to be done about the dumped plastic too. That is causing soil and aquatic pollution.

  • Abby Goldberg

    True plastic bag litter is just a drop in the bucket when it comes to the damage we are doing to the planet, But if we can’t fix this issue by banning the bag, changing our behavior with the simple act of refusing the bag, how ae we going to deal with the bigger issues?

  • Asherah Sarasvati Athena Siri

    Can someone please confirm that President Obama has proposed a plastic bag ban? I cannot find confirmation of this claim anywhere else. Source link please? Thanks!

  • Manthra koliyer

    This has been taken from VOA.. For further details you can refer to that site!

    • Asherah Sarasvati Athena Siri

      Thanks–I did a search and this is the only article I found recently that talks about the discussion of banning plastic bags. The thumbnail search blurb states the Obama administration recommended banning plastic bags, but when you actually click on the article it doesn’t even discuss the Obama administration proposing any ban at all. http://www.voanews.com/a/plastic-and-the-oceans/3512828.html Do you know of a different link?

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  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    ya! plastics should be banned because over use of plastic will lead to over non disposal garbage and to disposal we might harm the natural resources its better to use the renewable resources.

  • Manthra koliyer

    This should be followed all over the world

  • Enakshi

    a great initiative..

  • Ayushi Gaur

    Responsible initiative

  • Kathi Brennan King

    More than 150 cities and counties in California alone have regulated single use bags so the total figure is many more than the 12 cited at the beginning of this article. California has Prop 67 on the November ballot – a referendum brought about by the plastics industry. If it passes, California will be the first state with a statewide law (Hawaii’s law covers the whole state but is county by county). These bags do need to be regulated to stem the tide of single use plastics polluting our open spaces and marine environments.

    • Deborah SG

      Cambridge, Mass.; Brookline, Mass. (which has banned single-use plastic bags and styrofoam cups and containers).

  • Arya Sharan

    Plastic ban is a good initiative but something needs to be done about the dumped plastic too. That is causing soil and aquatic pollution.

  • Abby Goldberg

    True plastic bag litter is just a drop in the bucket when it comes to the damage we are doing to the planet, But if we can’t fix this issue by banning the bag, changing our behavior with the simple act of refusing the bag, how ae we going to deal with the bigger issues?

  • Asherah Sarasvati Athena Siri

    Can someone please confirm that President Obama has proposed a plastic bag ban? I cannot find confirmation of this claim anywhere else. Source link please? Thanks!

  • Manthra koliyer

    This has been taken from VOA.. For further details you can refer to that site!

    • Asherah Sarasvati Athena Siri

      Thanks–I did a search and this is the only article I found recently that talks about the discussion of banning plastic bags. The thumbnail search blurb states the Obama administration recommended banning plastic bags, but when you actually click on the article it doesn’t even discuss the Obama administration proposing any ban at all. http://www.voanews.com/a/plastic-and-the-oceans/3512828.html Do you know of a different link?

Next Story

Scientists: China’s Ban Causes Plastic To Pile Up, Nations Must Reduce Usage

The study was published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances

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Scientists: China's Ban Causes Plastic To Pile Up, Nations Must Reduce Usage
Scientists: China's Ban Causes Plastic To Pile Up, Nations Must Reduce Usage, Pixabay

China’s decision to stop accepting plastic waste from other countries is causing plastic to pile up around the globe, and wealthy countries must find a way to slow the accumulation of one of the most ubiquitous materials on the planet, a group of scientists said.

The scientists sought to quantify the impact of the Chinese import ban on the worldwide trade in plastic waste, and found that other nations might need to find a home for more than 122 million tons (110 million metric tons) of plastic by 2030. The ban went into effect Dec. 31, 2017, and the stockpiling trend figures to worsen, the scientists said.

Wealthy countries such as the United States, Japan and Germany have long sent their plastic recyclables to China, and the country doesn’t want to be the world’s dumping ground for plastic anymore. The study found China has taken more than 116 million tons (105 million metric tons) of the material since 1992, the equivalent of the weight of more than 300 Empire State Buildings.

The change is forcing countries to rethink how they deal with plastic waste. They need to be more selective about what they choose to recycle, and more fastidious about reusing plastics, said Amy Brooks, first author on the study and a doctoral student in engineering at the University of Georgia. In the meantime, Brooks said, more plastic waste is likely to get incinerated or sent to landfills.

“This is a wake-up call. Historically, we’ve been depending on China to take in this recycled waste and now they are saying no,” she said. “That waste has to be managed, and we have to manage it properly.”

plastic cups
plastic cups, Pixabay

The study was published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. Using United Nations data, it found that China has dwarfed all other plastics importers, accounting for about 45 percent of the world’s plastic waste since 1992. The ban is part of a larger crackdown on foreign garbage, which is viewed as a threat to health and environment.

Some countries that have seen an increase in plastic waste imports since China’s ban — such as Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia — are already looking to enforce bans of their own because they are quickly becoming overburdened, Brooks said.

The study illustrates that plastic, which has a wide array of uses and formulations, is more difficult to recycle than other materials, such as glass and aluminum, said Sherri Mason, who was not involved in the study and is the chair of the geology and environmental sciences department at the State University of New York at Fredonia.

Many consumers attempt to recycle plastic products that can’t ultimately be recycled, Mason said. One solution could be to simplify the variety of plastics used to make products, she said.
“We have to confront this material and our use of it, because so much of it is single use disposable plastic and this is a material that doesn’t go away,” Mason said. “It doesn’t return to the planet the way other materials do.”

The plastics import ban has attracted the attention of the U.S. recycling industry. The National Recycling Coalition said in a statement in mid-May that it must “fundamentally shift how we speak to the public” and “how we collect and process” recyclables.

Also read: A Secret Ingredient Of Your Favorite Sushi: Microplastic

“We need to look at new uses for these materials,” said Marjorie Griek, the coalition’s executive director. “And how do you get manufacturers to design a product that is more easily recyclable.” (VOA)