Wednesday July 18, 2018

Can Bariatric Surgery Prevent Kidney Disease?

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Bariatric Surgery
representational image. Pixabay
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Undergoing bariatric surgery may significantly lower the risk of developing severe chronic kidney disease and kidney failure, according to a study.

Obesity is a dangerous condition and goes hand in hand with elevated blood pressure, cardiovascular diseases and Type-2 diabetes, which in turn may lead to complications such as chronic kidney disease.

Obesity is also an independent risk factor in developing chronic kidney disease. Different obesity treatment strategies include lifestyle interventions, dietary modification, pharmacological and surgical treatment.

ALSO READ: How weight-loss surgery can avoid death

Bariatric Surgery
Half of the patients received weight-loss surgery, and the other half were treated with conventional non-surgical methods in the primary health care. Pixabay

The findings showed that patients with evidence of kidney damage — high levels of protein in the urine — benefited most from surgical treatment, indicating that surgery prevents progression of pre-existing kidney injury towards renal failure.

“The study reported long-term effects of bariatric surgery compared to usual obesity care on incidence of end-stage renal disease alone and in combination with chronic kidney disease stage 4,” said A. Shulman, from the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden.

ALSO READ: Why You Feel Hungrier After Weight Loss

These results add to a large body of evidence which demonstrates that bariatric surgery, reduces mortality, improves type 2 diabetes and prevents cardiovascular disease and cancer, the researchers added. IANS

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Obesity Alone Does not Increase Death Risk: Study

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease

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The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.
The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors. Pixabay

Patients who have metabolically healthy obesity but are free from other metabolic risk factors do not have an increased rate of mortality, a new study has found.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Obesity, showed that unlike dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes — each one of which is related to high mortality risk — obesity alone does not pose any threat to life.

“We are showing that individuals with metabolically healthy obesity are actually not at an elevated mortality rate,” said lead author Jennifer Kuk, Associate Professor at the York University in Canada.

“We found that a person of normal weight with no other metabolic risk factors is just as likely to die as the person with obesity and no other risk factors,” Kuk added.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay

For the study, the research team followed 54,089 men and women from five cohort studies who were categorized as having obesity alone or clustered with a metabolic factor, or elevated glucose, blood pressure or lipids alone or clustered with obesity or another metabolic factor.

The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.

They found that one out of 20 individuals with obesity had no other metabolic abnormalities.

Also Read: Abdominal Obesity Linked to Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms

“This is in contrast with most of the literature and we think this is because most studies have defined metabolic healthy obesity as having up to one metabolic risk factor,” said Kuk.

“This is clearly problematic, as hypertension alone increases your mortality risk and past literature would have called these patients with obesity and hypertension, ‘healthy’. This is likely why most studies have reported that ‘healthy’ obesity is still related with higher mortality risk,” Kuk noted.

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. (IANS)

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