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BBC’s “Bollywood’s Dark Secret” speaks nothing

Anchor Rajini Vaidyanathan asks no hard-hitting questions. There is no answer to the crucial question: "why have Bollywood's casting-couch victims not come out with their experiences?"

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Apart from Radhika Apte holding forth in a British accent and Usha Jadhav speaking of her harrowing experience in a Marathi accent, the BBC's much-discussed documentary
BBC representational Image, wikimedia commons
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Apart from Radhika Apte holding forth in a British accent and Usha Jadhav speaking of her harrowing experience in a Marathi accent, the BBC’s much-discussed documentary “Bollywood’s Dark Secret” says nothing that we haven’t already heard or seen.

Anchor Rajini Vaidyanathan asks no hard-hitting questions. There is no answer to the crucial question: “why have Bollywood’s casting-couch victims not come out with their experiences?”

Radhika Apte talks about men in Bollywood being as powerful as “Gods” whom no one would dare point a finger at. She isn’t doing it either. She has no personal story of exploitation to share.

Radhika Apte talks about men in Bollywood being as powerful as "Gods" whom no one would dare point a finger at. She isn't doing it either. She has no personal story of exploitation to share.
Radhika Apte, wikimedia commons

It’s all about others. Luckily for us, Usha Jadhav is not afraid to speak her mind. She speaks unabashedly about the man who abused her physically, touched her anywhere and everywhere, put his hand in her clothes.

But who was this man? I even asked Usha why she doesn’t want to name him.

“Because it wouldn’t be right,” she told me.

Right for whom?

Is this really what Bollywood has come to mean in the global arena’s “MeToo” campaign? Two actresses, one of whom is clearly talking about an out-of-body experience (all rhetorics and hypothesis suggesting she has never been through the casting couch), the other putting words to an experience that is too painful on recall and sounds more like a confession at a distress meeting in a sex clinic.

Beyond the truth about the symbiotic sexuality ingrained in Bollywood’s demand-and-supply mindset, there is the truth about the potential victim allowing herself to be exploited of her own free will.

Also Read: Rakhi Sawant Speaks up About Casting Couch

How free is that will which compels a girl to get on the casting couch voluntarily? The BBC documentary is not able to extricate Bollywood’s ‘Dark Secret’ from the clutches of cliches. It needed more muscle and heft to be persuasive. All we get is a couple of opinions swathed in vague rhetorics. No naming no shaming.

After watching the BBC’s sketchy account of the casting couch in Bollywood, I am more than ever convinced that the “MeToo” movement is far removed from our perception. The predators won’t stop, because there is no concerted will to stop them. (BollywoodCountry)

 

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Yami Gautam Feels Need For Stories of More Stronger Women

Yami Gautam said that when she was shooting for "Uri", she was very intrigued largely with the stories of personnel from the armed forces

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Yami Gautam
Need for stories of more stronger women: Yami. Flickr

Actress Yami Gautam, who will next be seen in the upcoming film “Uri”, says there is a need for stories of more stronger women on the silver screen.

Yami is excited to be a part of a real life story based on the armed forces. So much so, that it instantly inspired her to hope to bring forth stories of women who have been trailblazers and pioneers in the armed forces in India.

“With the way content is evolving and such compelling stories coming out, there’s a great need for stories of more stronger women. Some amazingly strong powerful women characters have been seen in recent films,” Yami said in a statement.

The 29-year-old actress is inspired by two women Punita Arora, the first woman in India to attain the rank of Lt. Genaral in the Indian Army and Priya Jhingan who wrote a letter to the then Army Chief in 1992 to be accepted as a woman in the armed forces and a year later she was, becoming the first Indian woman to have joined the Army.

Yami Gautam said that when she was shooting for “Uri”, she was very intrigued largely with the stories of personnel from the armed forces.

Yami Gautam
Yami Gautam. Flickr

She said: “It truly does make me wonder if stories of women from such background is something that could make for compelling stories. We have incredible women heroes from the army, navy who have done incredible acts in their careers.

“I think these stories must be done and Uri has really been a reason to bring forth such a thought to me.”

“Uri” also stars Vicky Kaushal, who will be seen playing the role of an Indian commando who is involved in the 2016 surgical strikes.

Also Read- WhatsApp Announces 20 Teams To Curb Fake News Globally

Based on the surgical strikes of 2016 carried out by the Indian Armed Forces, “Uri” traces the significant event.

It also features Kirti Kulhari and Paresh Rawal in lead roles. Produced by RSVP movies, “Uri” will hit the theatres on January 11, 2019. (IANS)