Monday June 17, 2019
Home Life Style Beauty Tips Beauty Ritual...

Beauty Rituals to Follow During Monsoon

Contrary to what most people believe, moisturising is as important in summer as it is in winter

0
//
Beauty Rituals to Follow During Monsoon
Beauty Rituals to Follow During Monsoon. Pixabay

During monsoon, do not stop taking care of your skin thinking that the blazing sun would not harm your skin anymore. Use a soap-free cleanser, exfoliate regularly and do not skip the toner, say experts.

Shankar Prasad, founder at Plum; Chytra V Anand, Cosmetic Dermatologist and founder of Kosmoderma Skin and Hair Clinic, and Cyril Feuillebois, director of Kronokare, have listed the must-follow steps for the rainy season:

* Limit washing your face 2-3 times a day with a soap-free cleanser. This will help maintain a clean, healthy skin without stripping your skin off its essentials oil.

* Exfoliating the skin is necessary to get rid of the dead layers on your skin. Get a regular skin exfoliation treatment like microdermabrasion or mild chemical peel to reduce the risk of falling prey to infection.

* Always go for a minimal make-up and products from the organic front. Let your pores breathe. Apply a lip balm that can moisturize the lips, keep one handy so that you can use it anytime.

Always go for a minimal make-up and products from the organic front
Always go for a minimal make-up and products from the organic front. Pixabay

* Don’t skip the toner. In summer, we tend to sweat a lot and this can cause our skin pores to open up. Use a toner after cleansing to help shrink these pores. Invest in an alcohol-free toner with antioxidant ingredients like green tea and glycolic acid that help tighten enlarged pores, to control blemishes and acne, while removing dead cells.

* Choosing the right sunscreen for the right complexion and skin type is extremely important. Use nothing below SPF 30. Put where your skin gets exposed to the sun for a long period of time, apply evenly and generously on the face before sun exposure.

Re-apply frequently, especially after swimming or drying yourself with a towel. Apply every 2-3 hours for optimum protection.

* Seal the moisture with a mask. Control oiliness in the skin caused by humidity, with a once-a-week clay mask that naturally absorbs oil. Look for one with tea tree or green tea extracts and gentle exfoliation to prevent breakouts by removing dead cells and impurities from the pores.

* Contrary to what most people believe, moisturising is as important in summer as it is in winter. Exposure to the sun and pollution strips off the natural oils of your skin, causing it to tan and age early. So you need a light, non-greasy day cream that has a minimum of SPF30, and mild natural ingredients such as grape seed and sea buckthorn that aid cell repair and regeneration.

moisturising is as important in summer as it is in winter.
Moisturising is as important in summer as it is in winter. Pixabay

* Take extra care of sensitive areas: The skin on our lips and around our eyes is thinner than that on the rest of the face, so they need extra attention during the summer. The heat can make the eyes burn and lips, chapped. Make sure you splash your eyes regularly, and keep your lips protected with lip balm.

* If you can’t do without kajal, invest in an ophthalmologically approved, waterproof kajal pencil, free from parabens, mineral oil or paraffin. Also, remove all make-up before retiring for the night, and soothe your eyes with rosewater-dipped cotton balls.

Also Read: French Skincare Founder Says, Indians Paying More Attention To Skin

* Take Vitamin C to boost your immune system as that can help fight infections.

* Dust yourself with antifungal powder on clean dry skin to stay away from unwanted infections.

* Use gentle products and maintain a good, simple routine using sunscreen regularly and incorporating chemical peels or exfoliants, so your skin will transition smoothly. (Bollywood Country)

Next Story

Delayed Monsoon Spells Trouble for Farmers

The real challenge will be looking at the income security of small and marginal farmers in rain-fed areas

0
Monsoon, Trouble, Farmers
The areas with irrigation such as Punjab and Haryana are not of concern. Pixabay

Southwest monsoon this year has become a thing of concern for policymakers as it has not just been delayed by a week, but it is also likely to be sluggish and erratic, which may spell trouble for the farm sector.

Paddy, the primary crop of the kharif season, is likely to be hit as June as well as July are expected to be rain-deficit. The output of pulses such as arhar (pigeon pea), soybean and coarse cereals is also likely to be affected.

As droughts occurred in patches across the country, there won’t be a disastrous impact on the overall food-grain production but it may have beating on small and marginal farmers by way of breaching their income security.

“The areas with irrigation such as Punjab and Haryana are not of concern. The real challenge will be looking at the income security of small and marginal farmers in rain-fed areas,” said T. Nandkumar, former Union Agriculture Secretary.

Monsoon, Trouble, Farmers
Southwest monsoon this year has become a thing of concern for policymakers. Pixabay

A senior official at the Agriculture Ministry said that it was in constant touch with the states to apprise the Centre of the developing situation.

“We have asked them to be prepared with precautionary and remedial measures in case there is deficit rainfall,” said the official, requesting anonymity.

However, there was no clarity if the state governments have ensured optimum seed reserves if first sowing attempt goes waste due to erratic rainfall.

The Food Ministry has started procuring over 50,000 tonnes of onion to deal with shortage if output goes down, indicating the government is not optimistic about good rainfall this year.

Also Read- Amazon is Shutting Down its Food-Delivery Business

Farmers have been advised by private weather forecaster Skymet to postpone sowing by almost a week of the conventional dates as it said there are less chances of rains if the onset of the monsoon is delayed.

If there is a long gap between two rain spells, there is high probability of newly planted seeds getting killed.

Skymet has predicted “below average” monsoon — 93 per cent of LPA — this year with indications of higher risk in the eastern parts and major portion of Central India being rain deficient.

The average, or normal, rainfall in the country is defined between 96 and 104 per cent of a 50-year average for the entire four-month monsoon season, or Long Period Average (LPA), which is 887 mm.

Monsoon, Trouble, Farmers
Paddy, the primary crop of the kharif season, is likely to be hit as June as well as July are expected to be rain-deficit. Pixabay

Meanwhile, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) has predicted “near normal” monsoon — 95 per cent of the LPA — with evenly distributed rainfall.

It, however, said there is 51 per cent chance that the monsoon would be normal or above while there is 49 per cent probability that it remains below normal.

The Agriculture Ministry official said the rainfall this time is expected to be “erratic” and “sluggish” citing recent developments related to the monsoon.

The second half of the rainy season would see better rainfall as August and September are expected to see normal rains. However, the entire season is expected to end on a deficit note.

Also Read- YouTube CEO Apologises to LGBTQ Community

The rainfall in June will be 77 per cent (164 mm) of the LPA while it will be 91 per cent (289 mm) in July, 102 per cent (261 mm) in August and 99 per cent (173 mm) in September, as per Skymet.

Skymet has said that paddy production is expected to reduce to 97.78 million tonnes this kharif season compared to 101.96 million tonnes in the previous season.

It also said there is 40 per cent possibility of about 66 per cent districts in the country being deficient or largely deficient if the monsoon is “below normal”.

Nandkumar expects about 100 districts, including those in Maharashtra’s Vidarbha region, Telangana, Bihar and Jharkhand, to be rain deficient. (IANS)