Saturday December 15, 2018
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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?
Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out? Pixabay
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After a tiring day at work, bedroom is where you want to be in. But elements like bright room colours and harsh lighting can be the reasons behind your stressful life.

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

– There are too many distractions: It’s wonderful to just lie in bed at night and watch TV. But falling asleep to violent news stories or crazy reality television shows aren’t exactly what you want. Instead, ditch the television and try reading a book.

– The room colour is too bright: The colour of your bedroom should reflect your personality. But if you think the shade is too bright for sleeping or just isn’t soothing, paint the space white for a calming effect.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– The lighting is harsh: Really strong lighting is uncomfortable no matter what room you’re in. You should have a bright lamp to help you to browse your closet, read a book or do your make-up. But you must also invest in a light that’s very dim to help create some ambience.

– It’s just too hot: Use natural fibers, which tend to be more breathable.

Also Read: Why It’s Important To Invest in a Good Mattress?

– There’s too much clutter: Bedrooms are generally cluttered with photos, jewellery, clothes and everything in between. To avoid this, try to make your bed every morning and tidy up every day. Also, make sure you have plenty of storage, so everything will have a place, instead of ending up all over the room. (Bollywood Country)

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Human Body May Not Cope With Evening Stress, Study Reveals

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening

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Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

Human bodies which experience stress in the evening release less cortisol — the primary stress hormone in humans — compared to stressful events in the morning, and thus may pose vulnerabilities, according to a new research.

The study, led by medical physiologist Yujiro Yamanaka at Japan’s Hokkaido University, the body’s central system reacts less strongly to acute psychological stress in the evening than it does in the morning, suggesting possible vulnerability to stressful events in the evening.

“Our study suggests a possible vulnerability to stress in the evening. However, it is important to take into account each individual’s unique biological clock and the time of day when assessing the response to stressors and preventing them,” Yamanaka commented.

The study, published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology Reports, explored a small group of young and healthy volunteers with normal work hours and sleep habits to find out if the “hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal” (HPA) axis responds differently to acute psychological stress according to the time of day.

The HPA axis connects the central nervous and endocrine systems of the body. Cortisol is released for several hours when the HPA axis is activated by a stressful event.

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Representational image. Pixabay

This helps provide the body with energy in the face of a perceived need for fight or flight. Cortisol levels are also regulated by a master circadian clock in the brain and are normally high in the morning and low in the evening.

The team first measured the diurnal rhythm of salivary cortisol levels from the volunteers and then exposed one group to stress test in the morning, and another to the evening.

Also Read- Millions Of Urban Children Worse Than Rural People: UNICEF

The researchers found that salivary cortisol levels increased significantly in the volunteers that took the stress test in the morning while no such response was observed in those that took the test in the evening.

“Our body can respond to the morning stress event by activating the HPA axis and sympathetic nervous system, but it needs to respond to evening stress event by activating the sympathetic nervous system only,” Yamanaka said. (IANS)