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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?
Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out? Pixabay
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After a tiring day at work, bedroom is where you want to be in. But elements like bright room colours and harsh lighting can be the reasons behind your stressful life.

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

– There are too many distractions: It’s wonderful to just lie in bed at night and watch TV. But falling asleep to violent news stories or crazy reality television shows aren’t exactly what you want. Instead, ditch the television and try reading a book.

– The room colour is too bright: The colour of your bedroom should reflect your personality. But if you think the shade is too bright for sleeping or just isn’t soothing, paint the space white for a calming effect.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– The lighting is harsh: Really strong lighting is uncomfortable no matter what room you’re in. You should have a bright lamp to help you to browse your closet, read a book or do your make-up. But you must also invest in a light that’s very dim to help create some ambience.

– It’s just too hot: Use natural fibers, which tend to be more breathable.

Also Read: Why It’s Important To Invest in a Good Mattress?

– There’s too much clutter: Bedrooms are generally cluttered with photos, jewellery, clothes and everything in between. To avoid this, try to make your bed every morning and tidy up every day. Also, make sure you have plenty of storage, so everything will have a place, instead of ending up all over the room. (Bollywood Country)

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Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate

Stress and tension leads to fluctuation in heart rate

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Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate
Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate, Pixabay

Too much job pressure may increase your risk developing a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to a stroke, dementia, heart failure and other complications.

The study found that being stressed at work was associated with a 48 per cent higher risk of atrial fibrillation.

“Work stress has previously been linked with coronary heart disease. Work stress should be considered a modifiable risk factor for preventing atrial fibrillation and coronary heart disease,” said study author Eleonor Fransson from Jonkoping University in Sweden.

Blood pressure monitor
Blood pressure monitor, Pixabay

“People who feel stressed at work and have palpitations or other symptoms of atrial fibrillation should see their doctor and speak to their employer about improving the situation at work,” she explained.

Also read: Eat less saturated trans fats to curb heart disease who

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, included 13,200 participants enrolled into the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) in 2006, 2008, or 2010.

For the study, the team defined work stress as job strain, which refers to jobs with high psychological demands combined with low control over the work situation.

Participants were employed and had no history of atrial fibrillation, heart attack, or heart failure.

They also completed postal surveys on sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, and work-related factors which included questions on job demands and control.

Heart rate
Heart rate, Flickr

After a median follow-up of 5.7 years, the researchers identified that work stress was a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

“Atrial fibrillation is a common condition with serious consequences and therefore it is of major public health importance to find ways of preventing it,” Fransson explained.

The symptoms of atrial fibrillation, according to the authors, may include palpitations, weakness, fatigue, feeling light headed, dizziness, and shortness of breath. (IANS)