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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?
Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out? Pixabay

After a tiring day at work, bedroom is where you want to be in. But elements like bright room colours and harsh lighting can be the reasons behind your stressful life.

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

– There are too many distractions: It’s wonderful to just lie in bed at night and watch TV. But falling asleep to violent news stories or crazy reality television shows aren’t exactly what you want. Instead, ditch the television and try reading a book.

– The room colour is too bright: The colour of your bedroom should reflect your personality. But if you think the shade is too bright for sleeping or just isn’t soothing, paint the space white for a calming effect.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– The lighting is harsh: Really strong lighting is uncomfortable no matter what room you’re in. You should have a bright lamp to help you to browse your closet, read a book or do your make-up. But you must also invest in a light that’s very dim to help create some ambience.

– It’s just too hot: Use natural fibers, which tend to be more breathable.

Also Read: Why It’s Important To Invest in a Good Mattress?

– There’s too much clutter: Bedrooms are generally cluttered with photos, jewellery, clothes and everything in between. To avoid this, try to make your bed every morning and tidy up every day. Also, make sure you have plenty of storage, so everything will have a place, instead of ending up all over the room. (Bollywood Country)

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Workplace Stress Can Increase Likelihood of Death: Study

The study, which was published in the Journal of Applied Psychology tells that workload can increase the risk of death

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A recent study shows that demanding jobs can lead to depression and death. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that stress, lack of autonomy and ability at the workplace or due to the demanding jobs can lead to depression and death.

The study, published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, found that our mental health and mortality have a strong correlation with the amount of autonomy we have at our job, our workload and job demands, and our cognitive ability to deal with those demands.

“When job demands are greater than the control afforded by the job or an individual’s ability to deal with those demands, there is a deterioration of their mental health and, accordingly, an increased likelihood of death,” said study lead author Erik Gonzalez-Mule from Indiana University in the US.

For the findings, the researchers used data from 3,148 Wisconsin residents who participated in the nationally representative, longitudinal Midlife in the US survey. Of those in their sample, 211 participants died during the 20-year study.

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Time pressure or workload affect mental and physical health and, ultimately, death. Pixabay

They examined how job control — or the amount of autonomy employees have at work — and cognitive ability — or people’s ability to learn and solve problems — influence how work stressors such as time pressure or workload affect mental and physical health and, ultimately, death.

“We found that work stressors are more likely to cause depression and death as a result of jobs in which workers have little control or for people with lower cognitive ability,” Gonzalez-Mule said.

Also Read: Safely Disinfect Your Prized Designer Shoes

On the other hand, the research team also found that job demands resulted in better physical health and lower likelihood of death when paired with more control of work responsibilities.

“COVID-19 might be causing more mental health issues, so it’s particularly important that work not exacerbate those problems,” Gonzalez-Mule said.

“This includes managing and perhaps reducing employee demands, being aware of employees’ cognitive capability to handle demands and providing employees with autonomy are even more important than before the pandemic began,” he noted. (IANS)

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Stress Cleaning is A Real Thing

Stress cleaning is a real thing, it can be destructive or productive subjectively

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Stress Cleaning can be good or bad, know more about it. Pixabay

Picking up cleaning equipment and getting down to clear clutter around oneself could be one possible way to cope with stress. Many health opinions suggest stress cleaning is an actual issue many people worldwide face. But, what really is stress cleaning?

“The act of cleaning, if done within limits, can bring an added benefit of exercise, which can be great for relieving stress, so called ‘stress-cleaning’. Response to stress can be subjective, for example, some people can comfort eat or exercise or some may resort to cleaning as a way of stress-busting”, states Dr Santosh Bangar, Consultant Psychiatrist, Global Hospital, Mumbai told IANSlife.

A cluttered house can lead to negative emotions like irritability, tension, worry, whereas a clean space is more likely to be linked to positive emotions like feeling happy, calm and a sense of wellbeing. People can experience a feeling of achievement or pride, enhanced self-esteem after a cleaning-up session.

What causes it?

Our brain responds to stress with a fight or flight reaction by the amygdala, which is associated with facilitating emotions like fear or anxiety. Another brain area called the prefrontal cortex regulating emotions gets deactivated and works less. So, while the stress is getting triggered, the system supposed to keep it in check is slowing down!

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Stress Cleaning can be a real issue in lockdown. Pixabay

Why it could be good and bad?

The response to stress is subjective, as some people can respond well to stress or even thrive (healthy stress), while other people’s emotions can be excessive leading to a full blown panic attack, characterised by shaking of body, dryness of mouth, sweating, palpitations, rapid breathing, feeling of impending doom. If excessive stress goes undetected or untreated, it may have number of physical and mental health complications.

Depression, anxiety disorders such as panic disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, substance misuse, sleep disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and suicide in extreme cases are known complications of untreated and persistent stress. Stress cleaning can worsen or induce OCD, Dr Bangar says.

The physical health complications include, impaired blood sugar or diabetes, high blood pressure or hypertension, heart attack, impaired fat levels and uncommonly various forms of cancers.

Also Read: Young Indians Are At An Evergrowing Risk Of Hypertension

Stress management:

Various forms of relaxation techniques are useful in dealing with stress, one such being ‘stress-cleaning’ or ‘stress-baking’ during periods of social isolation or lockdown. Others can be meditation, for example, mindfulness, yoga or deep breathing exercise. Listening to soothing music, taking regular exercise are other ways of managing stress at home. Reduce caffeine, smoking and alcohol intake, getting a refreshing sleep and eating a balanced diet can go long way to reduce stress. Of course, if these measures are not enough, then one must seek specialist professional help at the earliest. (IANS)

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International Nurses Day: Tips for Physical and Mental Well-Being of Nurses

Let's find out how they manage stress this International Nurses Day

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International Nurses Day, we find out how nurses cope up with the stress while discharging their duties. VOA

By Puja Gupta

To acknowledge the contributions and commitments of the nurses, the World Health Organisation announced 2020 as the “Year of Nurses and Midwives”.

With limited sleeping hours, extra responsibilities, and added pressure, the nurses have been on toes ever since the pandemic broke. They are at the forefront and working relentlessly under pressure, fear, exhaustion, isolation, and emotional trauma. The stress and fatigue is bound to impact mental health, safety, and ability to provide the best possible care.

On this International Nurses Day, IANSlife spoke to Usha Banerjee, Group Director of Nursing at Indraprastha Apollo Hospital shares some tips to ensure mental and physical well-being of the nurses.

Acknowledging stress

• To understand stress better it is important to acknowledge that one is experiencing stress, anxiety, and grief. It helps build will power and endurance

• Exercise self-compassion and recognise that almost everyone impacted by an emergency will experience psychological distress. These reactions are by no means an indication of weakness

• Understand that anyone helping during this time is susceptible to excessive stress and trauma, as a nurse, you are also vulnerable to secondary traumatic stress

• Know that you may also experience moral distress as you have to make difficult decisions pertaining to your personal and professional lives

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Nurses should practice Yoga in order to keep themselves healthy. Pixabay

Ensure well being

• Practice breathing exercises

• Eat regularly scheduled meals and avoid foods that increase inflammation in the body

• Try a mind-body practice like mindfulness or yoga

• Talk to family and close ones about your feelings of any kind of distress

Read More: Bollywood Celebs Concerned About Stranded Migrant Workers

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Nurses should talk to friends and loved one about what they’re feeling. Pixabay

Take Time for Your Mental Health

• Create ongoing supportive connections with colleagues who can validate and normalise your stressful experiences

• Schedule time for self-care, such as talking with a friend or meditating

• Seek out a trained mental health professional to help ensure that you are acknowledging your extreme stress. (IANS)