Friday February 22, 2019
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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

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Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out?
Is Your Bedroom Stressing You Out? Pixabay

After a tiring day at work, bedroom is where you want to be in. But elements like bright room colours and harsh lighting can be the reasons behind your stressful life.

Huffingtonpost.com shares what all can stress you out when you are in your bedroom:

– There are too many distractions: It’s wonderful to just lie in bed at night and watch TV. But falling asleep to violent news stories or crazy reality television shows aren’t exactly what you want. Instead, ditch the television and try reading a book.

– The room colour is too bright: The colour of your bedroom should reflect your personality. But if you think the shade is too bright for sleeping or just isn’t soothing, paint the space white for a calming effect.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

– The lighting is harsh: Really strong lighting is uncomfortable no matter what room you’re in. You should have a bright lamp to help you to browse your closet, read a book or do your make-up. But you must also invest in a light that’s very dim to help create some ambience.

– It’s just too hot: Use natural fibers, which tend to be more breathable.

Also Read: Why It’s Important To Invest in a Good Mattress?

– There’s too much clutter: Bedrooms are generally cluttered with photos, jewellery, clothes and everything in between. To avoid this, try to make your bed every morning and tidy up every day. Also, make sure you have plenty of storage, so everything will have a place, instead of ending up all over the room. (Bollywood Country)

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Weigh Gain in Women Can Be Cause Due To High Stress Jobs: Study

Efforts to reduce work-related stress would likely achieve a decrease not only in weight gain but also in the incidence of ill health

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Indonesia, e-commerce, computer
Indonesian domestic workers attend a computer class during their day off at the Sekolah Indonesia Singapura (Indonesian School) in Singapore, Dec. 12, 2010. VOA

Are you gaining weight suddenly? Blame increased stress at workplace, say researchers who found that heavy pressure at work predisposes women to weight gain, irrespective of whether they have received an academic education.

The findings, led by the University of Gothenburg in Sweden researchers, showed that long-term exposure to high job demands played a part only for women. In just over half of the women who had been subjected to high demands, a major increase in weight took place over the 20 years.

This gain in weight was some 20 per cent higher than in women subject to low job demands.

stress
Your body may not cope with evening stress: Study. Pixabay

On the other hand, women and men with a low degree of control in their work more frequently gained considerable weight, defined as a weight gain of 10 per cent or more.

“We were able to see that high job demands played a part in women’s weight gain, while for men there was no association between high demands and weight gain,” said lead author Sofia Klingberg, a researcher at the varsity.

“When it came to the level of demands at work, only the women were affected. We haven’t investigated the underlying causes, but it may conceivably be about a combination of job demands and the greater responsibility for the home that women often assume. This may make it difficult to find time to exercise and live a healthy life,” Klingberg added,

depression
Depression has significantly increased the risk of early death in women. Wikimedia

For the study, published in the journal International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, the team included 3,872 women and men who were investigated on three occasions over a 20-year period with respect to such variables as body weight and demands and control at work.

Also Read: Does Your Home or Office Have Enough Fire Safety?

They were followed either from age 30 to 50 or from 40 to 60.

Efforts to reduce work-related stress would likely achieve a decrease not only in weight gain but also in the incidence of ill health, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes, the researchers noted. (IANS)