Beer Brewing Leaves can Help Fix Gum Disease

There is potentially a large amount of bracts that could be re-purposed for dental applications

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Beer Brewing Leaves can Help Fix Gum Disease
Beer Brewing Leaves can Help Fix Gum Disease. Pixabay

Those who love beer would know that hops are what give the drink its bitterness and aroma.

Now, scientists have found that part of hops which is not used for making beer contains healthy antioxidants and could be used to battle cavities and gum disease.

“Antioxidant polyphenols in the hop leaves (called bracts) could help fight cavities and gum disease,” said Japanese researcher Yoshihisa Tanaka.

Bracts are not used for making beer and are discarded.

Thus, there is potentially a large amount of bracts that could be re-purposed for dental applications.

gum
Gum (Representational image). Pixabay

Extracts from bracts stopped the bacteria responsible for these dental conditions from being able to stick to surfaces and prevented the release of some bacterial toxins.

Tanaka and his colleagues decided to investigate what substances in these leaves might cause those healthy effects.

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Using a technique called chromatography, they found three new compounds, one already known compound that was identified for the first time in plants and 20 already known compounds that were found for the first time in hops.

The bracts also contained substantial amounts of proanthocyanidins, which are healthful antioxidants, said Tanaka in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (Bollywood Country)

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Here’s Why Consumption of Half Pint of Beer a Day May Help You Live Longer

However, the researchers claim their results do not mean non-drinkers should start drinking and they are being urged not to start drinking in a bid to live longer

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Beer
According to the researchers, one theory is moderate drinking is good for heart health. But too much drinking can be toxic. Pixabay

In a good news to beer lovers, researchers have found that men who consume half a pint of beer a day are 81 per cent more likely to reach the milestone age when compared to non-drinkers.

The study also found that women who drink similar amounts increase by a third their chance of reaching that landmark.

The research from Maastricht University in Netherlands, also revealed that men who drink three shots of whisky or two pints every day are two-thirds more likely to reach 90 than the person who never drinks alcohol, reports thesun.co.uk.

For the finding, the researchers tracked the drinking habits of 5,500 people over two decades.

“Our analyses show significantly positive associations between alcohol and longevity in men and women,” study lead researcher Professor Piet van den Brandt was quoted as saying by thesun.co.uk.

According to the researchers, one theory is moderate drinking is good for heart health. But too much drinking can be toxic.

However, the researchers claim their results do not mean non-drinkers should start drinking and they are being urged not to start drinking in a bid to live longer.

Glass Of Beer, Beer, Glass, Alcohol, Drink, Beverage
In a good news to beer lovers, researchers have found that men who consume half a pint of beer a day are 81 per cent more likely to reach the milestone age when compared to non-drinkers. Pixabay

“The results should not be used as motivation to start drinking,” the researchers said.

According to the researchers, National Health Service (NHS) guidelines recommend no more than 14 units of alcohol weekly – roughly six pints of beer or six standard glasses of wine.

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However, Sir Ian Gilmore from Alcohol Health Alliance UK, said: “There is no evidence to suggest non-drinkers should start for the good of their health.” (IANS)

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Researchers Explore Big Step to Make the Perfect Head of Beer

But researchers have simply been on a different track, thinking of general surface properties and not about the structures created when different molecules assemble at the surface of bubbles

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Beer
A pint of beer is poured into a glass in a bar in London, Britain. VOA

Drinkers will soon be cheering all the way to the bar as researchers have taken a big step forward in solving the puzzle of how to make the perfect head of beer.

Beers drinkers might be able to enjoy a pint where the head lasts all the way to the bottom of the pint glass, according to the findings.

The study, published in the journal – Chemical Communications, solved a long-standing mystery related to the lifetime of foams.

The researchers from the University of Manchester in UK used a nuclear reactor to fire neutrons at fluids to assess their foaming qualities.

“Just like when we see light reflecting off a shiny object and our brains help us identify it from its appearance, when neutrons reflect up off a liquid they are fired at we can use a computer to reveal crucial information about its surface,” said study lead researcher Richard Campbell.

“The difference is that the information is on a molecular level that we cannot see with our eyes,” Campbell added.

This could be useful for the development of a range of products that improve the creamy topping on a flat white coffee, the head on a pint of beer, shampoos we use every day, firefighting foams or even oil absorbent foams used to tackle environmental disasters, according to the research.

The research team studied mixtures containing surfactant – a compound that lowers surface tension – and a polymer – used in shampoos – to come up with a new way of understanding the samples that could help product developers formulate the ideal foam.

The technology could improve the formulation of detergents used in washing machines where the production of foams is undesirable.

Beer
Beer bottles. Wikimedia Commons

And it could also be used to develop more effective products to clean up our oceans by improving the action of oil slick cleaning detergents or potentially even save lives by making fire-fighting foam more effective.

“For decades scientists have tried to get a handle on how to control reliably the lifetime and stability of foams made from liquids that contain mixed additives,” Campbell said.

While the behaviour of foams made up with just one additive is quite well understood. As soon as mixtures like those used in products were studied the results from research studies failed to paint a consistent picture.

“This is important, as some products benefit from foams that are ultra-stable and others from foams that are very unstable,” Campbell said.

The scientists got to grips with the problem by studying the building blocks of the bubbles themselves, known as foam films.

Through reflecting neutrons off their liquid samples, they devised a new way to relate the stability of foam films to the way in which the additives arrange themselves at the surface of the liquid coating of bubbles to provide the stability needed to prevent them from bursting.

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“Foams are used in many products – and product developers have long tried to improve them so they are better equipped for the task they are designed to tackle”, Campbell said.

But researchers have simply been on a different track, thinking of general surface properties and not about the structures created when different molecules assemble at the surface of bubbles.

“It was only through our use of neutrons at a world-leading facility that it was possible to make this advance because only this measurement technique could tell us how the different additives arrange themselves at the liquid surface to provide foam film stability,” Campbell added. (IANS)

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Teenagers Who View Beer Ads Likely To Start Drinking: Study

Study says that beer advertisements influences underage drinking

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Beer advertisements
Beer advertisements are made in such a way that they influence underage drinking. Pixabay

Advertising budgets and strategies used by beer companies appear to influence underage drinking, suggests a new study.

The findings, published in the journal Addictive Behaviours Reports, showed that the amount of money spent on advertising strongly predicted the percentage of teenagers who had heard of, preferred and tried different beer brands.

For the study, the researchers involved over 1500 middle and high school students.

The study revealed that 99% participants had heard of Budweiser and Bud Light — the top spender on advertising, while 44 per cent said they had used the brand.

“We can’t say from this one study that advertisers are specifically targeting youth, but they are hitting them, if you look at beer ads, advertisers are using all the tricks we know work at grabbing children’s attention,” said study researcher Douglas Gentile from Iowa State University in the US.

Around 55% participants had at least one alcoholic drink in the past year, 31 per cent had one or more drinks at least once a month and 43 per cent engaged in heavy drinking.

When asked to name their two favourite TV commercials, alcohol-related ads had the highest recall (32 per cent) followed by soft drinks (31 per cent), fashion (19 per cent), automotive (14 per cent) and sports nine per cent.

Drinking beer
Most of the teenagers said in the survey that beer advertisements tempt them to try alcohol. Pixabay

A quarter of those surveyed said they owned alcohol-related products.

The study also found that teenagers are heavy consumers of media and therefore exposed to more advertising.

“Viewers or readers aren’t thinking about the message through a critical lens,” instead, audiences become immersed in a compelling story and identify with the characters, a process which leads them to unintentionally be persuaded by the messages of the story,” said study researcher Kristi Costabile.

During the study, researchers also asked teenagers about their intentions to drink as an adult.

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Advertising and parent and peer approval of drinking were all significant predictors of intention to drink.

“By understanding what influences behaviour we can design more effective prevention and intervention programmes to reduce underage drinking, which in turn could lessen the likelihood that alcohol use becomes a problem,” Brooke Arterberry said. (IANS)