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Sam’s Town: Being a Minority in “AmeriKKKa” 2015

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By Kristen J. Simmons

Image by livenewscentral.com
Image by livenewscentral.com

 In post-wake of the racially motivated terrorist attack on Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church,  America’s anti-black/brown sentiment has only driven a knife deeper into an already infected wound.  Weeks after the attack, the racist hate group known as the Ku Klux Klan, or the KKK, planned a rally on  South Carolina state grounds on Saturday, 18 July. For a group whose history is that of such a supremacist and hateful nature, it brings about a question of morals. Why is the KKK allowed to have  such gatherings in this “great land” that is a melting pot of cultures and ethnic backgrounds, a place of  supposed acceptance? The answer can be summed up from a simple line in the national anthem “For the  land of the free,” err… unless you’re black.

 Let me explain! Throughout America’s history, the gathering of a significant number of people of color  has been seen as a threat to society. Starting in 1966, the Black Panther Party thrived and delivered a message of ending police brutality and promoting black pride. It was followed by false notions

panther_logo

spread by those in power afraid of strong and independent black people. The party was disabled in 1982 by the government under the false guise that the Black Panthers were a militant extremist group.

The question still remains: When will we begin calling out white people for their problematic behavior in the same manor we label black people and falsify their actions as violent? White America has proven to be very uncomfortable with the gathering of colored people. Why else would a pride group of African Americans be dismantled by the government while a supremacy group of Caucasians that have caused terror on minorities for decades be allowed to rally in public spaces?

Events like these are happening all across America on many different scales. Brown skinned Middle Easterners are discriminated against by prejudice and racist people who are paranoid about terrorism. In America the government has brainwashed us into thinking that terrorism has a color and a nationality that comes from the other side of this world. Meanwhile, actual terrorists born and raised in our own nation such as the Charleston shooter rarely ever carry the weight of such labels. It’s almost as if America has a hidden clause about what makes one a racist. CAUTION: MUST BE AT LEAST THIS DARK TO BE CONSIDERED A THREAT TO SOCIETY.

So what does it mean to be a brown or a black in 2015?

We are unreasonably feared and simultaneously envied, we are discriminated against and our culture is appropriated, we are under privileged but told that we live in a fair society

The light of recent events in America regarding race has shown that there is a lot of work to be done when it comes to racial equality. Black America and minorities of this nation alike have a lot of protesting, trials, and tears ahead.

Be prepared, be mindful, and stay woke!

Kristen is a native of Mississippi, USA and would be joining University of Illinois at Chicago this fall for her studies in Communications. 

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Copyright 2015 NewsGram

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Will sexual misconduct scandals make Men more cautious towards Women?

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Sexual scandals may wary men's behavioral instincts
FILE - In a Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg is photographed at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Some women, and men, worry that the same climate that’s emboldening women to speak up about harassment could backfire by making some men wary of female colleagues. Sandberg recently wrote that she hoped the outcry over harassment doesn’t “have the unintended consequence of holding women back.” (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
  • Sexual Scandals are the new low in business industry
  • Americans were already edgy about male-female encounters at work
  • Gender comes as a barrier in interaction

Some women, and men, worry the same climate that’s emboldening women to speak up about sexual misconduct could backfire by making some men wary of female colleagues.

Forget private meetings and get-to-know-you dinners. Beware of banter. Think twice before a high-ranking man mentors a young female staffer.

“I have already heard the rumblings of a backlash: ‘This is why you shouldn’t hire women,’” Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg wrote in a recent post .

“So much good is happening to fix workplaces right now. Let’s make sure it does not have the unintended consequence of holding women back,” said Sandberg, author of the working women’s manifesto “Lean In.”

Sexual Scandals
From left, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., accompanied by Rep. Cheri Bustos, D-Illinois., and former Fox News host Gretchen Carlson, speaks at a news conference where she and other members of congress introduce legislation to curb sexual harassment in the workplace, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, in Washington. Gillibrand and fellow female Democratic senators have united in calling for Sen. Al Franken to resign amid sexual misconduct allegations. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Ana Quincoces, a Miami-based attorney and entrepreneur who owns her own food line, says her business and its success involves working mostly with men, and sales and other activities are often concluded over lunch or drinks. Those opportunities, she says, are dwindling, because many of the men she knows through her business “are terrified.”

“There’s a feeling of this wall that wasn’t there that is suddenly up because they don’t know what’s appropriate anymore — it’s disconcerting,” Quincoces said. “I feel that they’re more careful, more formal in their relationships with co-workers. And I can’t say I blame them, because what’s happened is pervasive. Every day there’s a new accusation.”

She said many of the men she knows are now avoiding one-on-one social occasions that were normal in the past.

“This is going to trickle down into all industries. … It’s going to become the new normal,” Quincoces said. “It’s a good thing because women are not afraid anymore, but on the other side, it’s a slippery slope.”

Americans were already edgy about male-female encounters at work: A New York Times/Morning Consult poll of 5,300 men and women last spring found almost two-thirds thought workers should be extra careful around opposite-sex colleagues, and around a quarter thought private work meetings between men and women were inappropriate.

But in a season of outcry over sexual misconduct, some men are suddenly wondering whether they can compliment a female colleague or ask about her weekend. Even a now-former female adviser to the head of Pennsylvania’s Democratic Party suggested on Facebook that men would stop talking to women altogether because of what she portrayed as overblown sexual misconduct claims.

Certain managers are considering whether to make sure they’re never alone with a staffer, despite the complications of adding a third person in situations like performance reviews, says Philippe Weiss, who runs the Chicago-based consultancy Seyfarth Shaw at Work.

Philadelphia employment lawyer Jonathan Segal says some men are declaring they’ll just shut people out of their offices, rather than risk exchanges that could be misconstrued.

“The avoidance issue is my biggest concern, because the marginalization of women in the business world is at least as big a problem as harassment,” Segal says. A recent report involving 222 North American companies found the percentage of women drops from 47 percent at the entry level to 20 percent in the C suite.

Vice President Mike Pence has long said he doesn’t have one-on-one meals with any woman except his wife and wants her by his side anywhere alcohol is served, as part of the couple’s commitment to prioritizing their marriage. The guidelines have “been a blessing to us,” the Republican told Christian Broadcasting Network News in an interview this month.

Employment attorneys caution that it can be problematic to curb interactions with workers because of their gender, if the practice curtails their professional opportunities. W. Brad Johnson, a co-author of a book encouraging male mentors for women, says limiting contact sends a troubling message.

“If I were unwilling to have an individual conversation with you because of your gender, I’m communicating ‘you’re unreliable; you’re a risk,’” says Johnson, a U.S. Naval Academy psychology professor.

Jessica Proud, a communications professional and Republican political consultant in New York City, said it would be wrong if this national “day of reckoning” over sexual misconduct resulted in some men deciding not to hire, mentor or work with women. She recalled a campaign she worked on where she was told she couldn’t travel with the candidate because of how it might look.

“I’m a professional, he’s a professional. Why should my career experience be limited?” she said. “That’s just as insulting in a lot of ways.” VOA