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Being Bilingual May Not Benefit Your Kids

In addition, the researchers considered children's German and Turkish vocabulary size and exposure to both languages

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Do you think bilingualism will benefit your kids in any way? Think twice. A new study suggests that although speaking more than one language can provide social opportunities along the way, bilingual children are not necessarily more advantageous than monolingual ones when it comes to executive functions.

Executive function includes remembering instructions, controlling responses, and shifting swiftly between tasks.

“The research of executive functions is important because they have direct application to success in both real-life and academic situations,” said Julia Jaekel, associate professor from the University of Tennessee in the US.

For the study, the team examined 337 children aged five and 15 among which the first group spoke both Turkish and German and the other group spoke only German.

Bilingual kids attain cognitive and perceptional benefits
Being Bilingual May Not Benefit Your Kids. Pixabay

They used a computer test to compare the executive function of two groups of children.

The results, published in PLOS ONE, showed no difference in the executive functions of the two groups.

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In addition, the researchers considered children’s German and Turkish vocabulary size and exposure to both languages.

However, it is important to continue the research on this topic so parents, educators, and policymakers do not overpromise on the benefits of speaking a second language, noted Nils Jaekel, clinical assistant professor at the varsity. (IANS)

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Consumption Of Sugary Beverages Declines Among US Kids: Study

US kids are consuming less sugary beverages, says a study

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Consumption of Beverages
Kids in USA have reduced the consumption of sweetened beverages. Pixabay

Children and adolescents in the United States consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) declined significantly between 2003 and 2014, says a study.

This decline in consumption was found among children and adolescents in all groups studied, including those participating in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the US federally funded programme that provides food assistance to more than 40 million low-income Americans each month — half of whom are children.

However, the study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine demonstrated that even with the decline, current levels remain too high, with 61 per cent of all children and 75.6 per cent of SNAP recipients still consuming an SSB on a typical day.

“While the observed declines in children’s sugar-sweetened beverage consumption over the past decade are promising, the less favourable trends among children in SNAP suggest the need for more targeted efforts to reduce sugary drink consumption,” said study lead investigator J. Wyatt Koma, Independent Researcher, US.

For the study, the research team used nationally representative dietary data for 15,645 children and adolescents (aged 2 to 19 years) from the 2003 to 2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES).

Sugary beverages
The decline in the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among kids is promising. Pixabay

They classified children according to self-reported participation in the SNAP programme and household income: 27.8 per cent were SNAP participants; 15.3 per cent were income-eligible but not SNAP participants; 29.7 per cent had lower incomes that were ineligible for SNAP; and 27.2 per cent had higher incomes that were ineligible for SNAP.

From 2003 to 2014, the share of children consuming an SSB on a typical day declined significantly across all SNAP participation groups, primarily driven by declines in soda consumption.

Among children who were SNAP participants, the percentage drinking SSBs declined from 84.2 per cent to 75.6 per cent and per capita daily consumption of SSB calories declined from 267 to 182 calories.

In 2014, nearly one in four children who were income-eligible for the SNAP programme consumed a fruit drink on any given day (SNAP participants: 24.8 per cent; Income-eligible nonparticipants: 23.4 per cent).

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The share of participants consuming a sports/energy drink on any given day tripled from 2003 to 2014 (from 2.6 percent to 8.4 per cent), the study said.

“While our results confirm that efforts to decrease SSB consumption over the past decade have been successful, they also suggest that the continued surveillance of children’s SSB consumption by beverage type is important,” said study senior author Sara N. Bleich from Harvard University in the US. (IANS)