Tuesday October 17, 2017
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Will Bengal’s syndicate Raj anguish the Trinamool Congress?

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Image source: www.hindustantimes.com

Kolkata: Simply defined, ‘syndicate’ means a group of individuals combining to promote a common interest; but in West Bengal, ‘syndicate’ not only dominates the economic aspect but is becoming a major political issue in the poll-bound state.

Enjoying political patronage, these cartels of muscle-flexing youth, are said to force promoters and contractors to buy construction materials often of inferior quality at high prices. It’s not just the brick or cement, even in hiring a legal expert for procedural formalities or a priest for performing the “bhumi pujan”, the syndicates have the final word.

From the city’s neighbouring Bidhannagar to the industrial belt of Asansol, these syndicates have been mushrooming wide and across and even the Calcutta High Court expressed its concern over the “syndicate raj”, pointing out that it has not spared even the judiciary.

While the allegations of political patronage for syndicates are mostly directed at the ruling Trinamool Congress (TMC), the Communist Party of India-Marxist-led Left Front has also faced similar accusations towards the end of its 34-year-long tenure.

In fact, in the early years of the last decade, when then state housing minister Gautam Deb announced plans to acquire large tracts of land in the city’s north eastern fringes to set up the sprawling Newtown-Rajarhat township, it was decided that the land losers would form co-operatives for supplying building materials to the new land owners.

Gradually, these co-operatives became powerful as muscle and money added to their growing influence in the localities. Such is their clout now, that even local problems like landlord-tenant disputes or quarrels regarding road tap water queues are handled by syndicate heads.

The Trinamool has landed into a mess following party MLA Sabyasachi Dutta’s candid admission of the “flourishing syndicate raj”.

Already reeling under the Narada issue – a sting operation by a portal showing several of key Trinamool leaders taking bribe — and the recent flyover collapse that killed 26 people, the Trinamool is now at the receiving end of the opposition. Prime Minister Narendra Modi, during a rally, said the TMC stands for “Terror”, “Maut” (death) and “Corruption”.

Two days after Dutta was caught in a sting in which he admitted how the “Rs.50 lakh to Rs.60 lakh required to fight the polls comes mostly from the syndicates”, Modi while campaigning in the state, tore into the Trinamool, saying “maut (death) and money have replaced the (TMC) slogan of “Maa Maati Manush (mother, land, people)”.

While the opposition – the CPI-M-led Left Front, the Congress and the BJP have been raising the syndicate issue time and again, Modi’s raising the issue has set the political temperatures soaring.

It’s not just in the poll season. The syndicates have been in the news for a long time with their highly lucrative business often alleged to be the major cause of factional feuds within the Trinamool.

With Bidhannagar and New Town being the hotbed of these syndicates, clashes allegedly between followers of Dutta and those of Bidhannagar’s Trinamool MLA, Sujit Bose – have often been reported.

There have also been several shoot-outs and murders involving members of the syndicates.

In fact, during her address to party supporters at a rally in the city, Banerjee sent out a strong message – asking them to choose between syndicates and the party.

West Bengal assembly elections are being held in six phases. The first phase was on April 4, the second is due on Monday. (IANS)

 

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This Durga Puja Brings Narratives of Communal Harmony

Durga puja is exemplifying communal harmony at a time when the world grapples with religious animosity and social polarisation

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Durga Puja
Durga Puja in at Bhopal Madhya Pradesh. Wikimedia

Kolkata, Sep 15, 2017: For over 200 years, the Nandi family in West Bengal’s Hooghly has been feeding Muslim fakirs during the Hindu festival of Durga Puja. To the Nandis, this annual ritual has its roots in a family legend that is testimony to the generosity of the local Muslim community.

It is also one of the myriad instances of the festival — the biggest in Bengal — exemplifying communal harmony at a time when the world grapples with religious animosity and social polarisation.

According to 80-year-old Satipati Nandi, the ninth-generation descendant of the family that claims to have been the “largest importer of betel nuts in eastern India once upon a time”, this Hindu-Muslim syncreticism comes naturally.

“It may sound as a big deal today but it all started centuries ago. It is said that two brothers, Kuber Shankar and Kama Shankar, were selling pakodas (fried snacks) in Halishahar in North 24-Parganas when they chanced upon a fakir who gave them a gold mohar (coin) to start an enterprise… revolving around the first thing they spot,” Nandi told IANS.

The rest is history.

The Nandis ventured into the betel nut business and eventually branched out into real estate, acquiring multiple properties across the state, including the present family residence at Pandua in Hooghly as well as land in Garia in south Kolkata.

Also Read: What makes Hindu Festival Durga Puja so popular in India? Know its Meaning and Significance 

“In remembrance of the generous fakir, we feed two fakirs on Navami (the ninth day of the festival). Now we usually do not find fakirs; so we offer khichdi to any two members of the Muslim community,” Nandi explained.

This communal integration has spilled on to the state capital Kolkata as well.

In the heart of Kolkata is Kumartuli — the potters’ enclave — which is in a state of frenzy with Durga Puja that is round the corner. The clay idols of Durga and her pantheon are being daubed in paint and their curves clothed in vibrant saris.

Their bald heads are carefully draped in jute wigs that have been painstakingly fashioned into braids and curly tresses for the Hindu goddess by Muslim craftsmen.

Neither blinding rain nor religion get in the way of business in this buzzing maze-like colony of potters and their assistants, labourers, decorators and tourists with selfie sticks — the point of origin of around 5,000 clay Durga idols each year.

Around 400 “shilpis” (craftsmen) churn out Durga and her children in crammed 6 by 10 foot studios, cloaked in tarpaulin sheets. The final touches, which begin around a fortnight before Mahalaya (September 19), include decking the idols in accessories.

“Draping the hair is an essential part of the process. The jute wigs are fashioned by Muslim families from Parbatipur near Howrah and other areas. A typical ‘sabeki’, or traditional idol, usually dons a curly and wavy wig. Essentially, they are mostly black but we do have variants of the wig in dark brown, rust and beige,” Babu Pal, a spokesperson for the potters, told IANS.

Slightly rough in texture, they are almost indistinguishable from your average wigs. Packed in bundles starting off at Rs 100, these are available as plaits, straight extensions for the sides or as wavy locks.

“Everyone comes to look at the idols. They admire, take pictures and go away. But it’s not just the idols… you have to assemble the goddess piece by piece. Muslim craftsmen usually fashion the dress material and the wigs. You may talk about cow politics and put a religious spin on it, for us it’s the way of life here… no one talks about this (Hindu-Muslim issues)… it’s business,” Pal elaborated.

According to Indologist Nrisingha Prasad Bhaduri, Hindu-Muslim integration during the Durga Puja was not uncommon in undivided Bengal.

“It has continued despite geographical barriers because the festival now is a huge industry. It provides employment to people from all communities. It’s only some politicians and communal-minded people who give it a different spin. During immersions too, everyone comes together to bid adieu to the goddess and family. She is looked at as a source of strength and not as a religious symbol,” Bhaduri added.

And you don’t have to look further than Begampur town in Hooghly district to see several Muslim families celebrating Durga Puja as a symbol of the common culture of the festival that unites Hindus with other minorities, at least in Bengal.

(This story is part of a special series that will showcase a diverse, plural and inclusive India and has been made possible by a collaboration between IANS and the Frank Islam Foundation. Sahana Ghosh can be contacted at sahana.g@ians.in)

-IANS

 

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Reason to worry over Communal Violence in Basirhat, says Nobel laureate Amartya Sen

Amartya Sen clearly sees reasons to worry over the communal riots erupted between two communities at Baduria on July 3 night over a Facebook post by a youth

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Amartya Sen, communal violence
Nobel laureate Amartya Sen on Monday said there is a "reason to worry" over the communal violence in Basirhat. Wikimedia
  • The communal violence that has engulfed pockets in Basirhat sub-division of West Bengal’s North 24 Parganas district are indeed worrisome
  • Violence erupted between two communities at Baduria on July 3 night over a Facebook post by a youth
  • In no time  the violence spread to various pockets in Basirhat

Kolkata, July 10, 2017: Nobel laureate Amartya Sen on Monday said there is a “reason to worry” over the communal violence that has engulfed pockets in Basirhat sub-division of West Bengal’s North 24 Parganas district.

“Why is it happening? Is it because someone is inciting it? We are all worried. How much political mischief is to be blamed for this? We have to ponder all these. There is a reason to worry over this,” Sen told a television channel here when asked about it.

“Bengal has a culture of co-existence of Hindu-Muslim communities and for a long time this co-existence was possible without any communalism, and suddenly this returns. We can’t be dismayed over this and let this be, thinking there is nothing to do in this matter… We have to take measures to get rid of these things,” he said.

The celebrated economist is in the city to attend the screening of a documentary on him directed by Suman Ghosh.

ALSO READKolkata: Special Screening of Amartya Sen documentary “An Argumentative Indian” on July 10

Violence erupted between two communities at Baduria on July 3 night over a Facebook post by a youth.

He was soon arrested but violence broke out with mobs attacking shops and houses, torching vehicles, including those of police, and putting up road blockades.

Several police personnel sustained injuries as the violence spread to various pockets in Basirhat. (IANS)

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Goddess Bonbibi: Here is Why this Goddess in Sunderban unites both Hindus and Muslims!

In Bengal's Sunderbans, both Hindu and Muslim community worship the Bonbibi goddess

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Goddess Bonbibi
Goddess Bonbibi in Sunderbans. Image source: beingkinetic.wordpress.com
  • The Goddess Bonbibi is worshiped by Hindu and Muslim communities in Bengal’s Sunderbans
  • Bibi serves as an all-purpose surname by Muslim women. Bonbibi literally means lady of the forest
  • Bonbibi festival is celebrated once every year in January and February

June 21, 2017: Bengal has sustained both Hindu and Muslim community for many years. Though a lot of difference exists in religious beliefs and practices of the two, one story sprouts similarity.

In Bengal’s Sunderbans, Goddess Bonbibi is worshiped by both the communities. The deity has been able to unite people from the two distinct religions. The Muslims can be seen as offering ‘bhog’, a Hindu tradition, to the goddess. In turn, interesting to note is the goddess’ name that ends with bibi- a predominantly Muslim women surname.

Historically, the goddess emerged as a protector of the fishing community, honey-gatherers and wood cutters from tiger attacks. Bonbibi literally means lady of the forest. It is a common belief that the goddess protects the forest and she never leaves the Sunderbans.

The devotees believe she was sent from the heavens to father Berahim and mother Golabibi in Mecca. The myth goes that two spiritual hats fell on her which helped her travel to Sunderbans. Upon arrival, she saw the forest to be ruled by man-eating tigers. Their tyrant god Dakhin Rai was responsible for human sacrifices.

Bonbibi defeated Dakhin Rai and helped the people live in a secure forest. The people thus considered Bonbibi a supreme being worthy of devotion. Since then, the village has been truthfully worshipping her.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

Also Read What significance does Rudraksha hold in Hinduism