Thursday February 21, 2019

Berries: Perfect for Skin Health

Berries like raspberries and strawberries will help to achieve a glow this party season, says an expert

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Berries: Perfect for Skin Health
Berries: Perfect for Skin Health. Pixabay

Berries like raspberries and strawberries will help to achieve a glow this party season, says an expert.

“Exposure to pollution, tobacco and toxins, consumed in excess at this time of year, leaves us vulnerable to free radical attack. Berries are powerhouses for cell protection and the perfect snack for skin health,” femalefirst.co.uk quoted Caroline Hitchcock, one of Britain’s leading facialists, as saying.

Berries: Perfect for Skin Health
Berries are beneficial for skin health. They bring glow to your skin. Pixabay

They contain manganese, which has the ability to convert toxins within the skin cells into oxygen, reducing skin damage.

You can even prepare a face mask with the fruity ingredient. A ready to glow mask will have a hydrating effect on the skin and also brighten the face. Just follow these three steps:

– Mash four strawberries, half an avocado, a little bit of lemon juice in a bowl and make a smooth paste.

You May Also Like: Here’s How You Can Keep Your Skin Hydrated in Summer

– Apply on face with a mask brush working into skin. Avoid eye area.

– Leave for up to 20 minutes then rinse with cool water. (Bollywood Country)

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Know How Higher Intake of Sodium Can Treat Lightheadedness

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

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"Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms," Juraschek said. Pixabay

Higher sodium intake should not be used as a treatment for lightheadedness, say researchers challenging current guidelines for sodium consumption.

Lightheadedness while standing, known as postural lightheadedness, results from gravitational drop in blood pressure and is common among adults.

Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions.

However, contrary to this recommendation, researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre (BIDMC) found that higher sodium intake, actually increases dizziness.

“Our study has clinical and research implications,” said Stephen Juraschek, researcher from BIDMC in Boston.

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Greater sodium intake is widely viewed as an intervention for preventing lightheadedness when moving from seated to standing positions. Pixabay

“Our results serve to caution health practitioners against recommending increased sodium intake as a universal treatment for lightheadedness. Additionally, our results demonstrate the need for additional research to understand the role of sodium, and more broadly of diet, on lightheadedness,” Juraschek said.

For the study, reported in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the team used data from the completed DASH-Sodium trial, a randomised crossover study that looked at the effects of three different sodium levels (1500, 2300, and 3300 mg/d) on participants’ blood pressure for four weeks.

While the trial showed that lower sodium led to decrease in blood pressure, it also suggested that concerns about lower level of sodium causing dizziness may not be scientifically correct.

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The study also questioned recommendations to use sodium to treat lightheadedness, an intervention that could have negative effects on cardiovascular health.

“Health practitioners initiating sodium interventions for orthostatic symptoms now have some evidence that sodium might actually worsen symptoms,” Juraschek said.

“Clinicians should check on symptoms after initiation and even question the utility of this approach. More importantly, research is needed to understand the effects of sodium on physical function, particularly in older adults.” (IANS)