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Looking for Best Healthy Snack Ideas For Tea-Break? Here is a List!

An array of best healthy snack ideas are here to cheer you up

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Healthy Snacks, tea
Best Healthy Snack Ideas For Tea-Break. Pixabay

New Delhi, July 31, 2017: A tea break is imperative for every Indian. Equally significant is to have the best healthy snack ideas to accompany your favorite cuppa. Be it crispy, sweet, fried or spicy we all look for easy to make snack ideas to add some more delight to our chai-break!

Here are some of the best healthy snack ideas to implement in your tea break. Deck up your tea time with some of the most awesome nutritious snacks. Get a glimpse here of some of the snack ingredients and try them out-

  • Kaju Kothimbir Vadi is very popular among the Maharashtrians. With cashew nuts you add up its nutrient level. also, it is an amazing admixture of crisp and soft. The best part is, you can finish cooking them within 10 minutes.
Roadside snack vendor. Pixabay
  • There is Mirchi Bajji, a spicy recipe made with green chillies, tamarind and coconut. It is best served hot with some chopped onions. If you are looking for something sweet and spicy, treat yourself with Aloo Boonda – a spicy potato filling tastes best when served with coriander chutney.

 

Mirchi Bajji. Wikimedia
  • The variety largely depends on which part of India you are in. For example, if you happen to be in U.P or Bengal, make sure to have some Khasta Kochuri. It is made with flour and moong daal stuffing. It tastes palatable when deep fried. You can also have it with tamarind chutney to make it all the more delicious.
Kochuri served with curry. Wikimedia

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  • There is again Murukku, all the way from South. Thanks to the diversity of Indian cuisine. Murukku is basically fried lentil snack. It is considered one of the most nutritious snack in Tamil Nadu. Murukku is best if you are considering something crispy and crunchy with tea.
Murukku. Wikimedia

 

  • If you are urging for something sweeter, Pinaca is a very traditional sweet and is filled with the goodness of coconut. Pinaca, a sweet dish hailing from Goa, is also known by the name Pinagr or Pinac. You can enjoy its flavor by storing them in a jar for upto a week.
Pinaca. Youtube
  • Nimki, last but not the least is a Bengali dish. It is quite simple and convenient to prepare, made with a mix of wheat flour and maida and Carom seeds.
Fried nimki. Wikimedia

The list is for you to treat your taste buds while sipping tea and trust me, you will never run out of choices!

–  by Puja Sinha of NewsGram. Twitter @pujas1994

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Here are 5 Indian Dishes that are Popular Across the Globe!

The five Indian dishes that even foreigners swear by

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Indian dishes and their unique spices
Indian spices and flavors. Wikimedia

New Delhi, July 25th, 2017: Reflecting the divergence of cultures; a perfect blend of zillion spices, creating in one’s taste bud, a blast of various flavors; leaving you wanting for more, that’s Indian cuisine for you!

With a country as diverse as ours, it is very much expected of India to maintain this diversity, when it comes to food as well. India doesn’t disappoint, as it contributes to the world, some of the best of food. Indian dishes have had, not just Indians, but the people around the world craving. According to a survey conducted by CNN Travel, recently, India has secured a place among the top 50 cuisines of the world. Here are five Indian dishes that are enjoying the global reputation.

Here are five Indian dishes that are enjoying the global reputation-

BIRYANI

Biryani enjoys global reputation
Biryani. Pixabay

Once you taste the Hyderabadi Biryani, there’s no going back. It is a dish made of rice, meat and is loved by people, India and abroad.

SAMOSA

Indian cuisine enjoying global reputation
Samosa. Pixabay

No one says no to Samosas, EVER! This is a fried snack stuffed with potatoes, and tastes best in combination with pudina (mint) chutney and chai! 

DHOKLA

Indian dishes enjoying global reputation
Dhokla. Pixabay

This soft and spongy snack is a delicious dish coming from the Indian state, Gujarat. It is made of fermented rice and chickpea batter and is perfect to begin your day with if you’re someone who likes their breakfast light yet tasty.

CHOLE BHATURE

Indian dishes enjoying global reputation
Chole bhature. Wikimedia

Chole bhature or the most popular dish in north India includes fried flour bread and curried chickpea. It can be eaten and enjoyed anytime of the day, as breakfast, lunch or dinner. Chole bhature when it rains, is hands down, the best idea.

DOSA

Indian food enjoys global reputation
Dosa. Wikimedia Commons

Because who doesn’t love Dosa? This is a dish that South Indians, North Indians, Non- Indians, everybody swears by. It is a South Indian dish made of rice batter and served with Sambhar and Coconut Chutney. 

These are the five Indian dishes that not only Indians but foreigners drool over as well.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha

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Cooking show nails the way Indian food should be shown

The new show which has him like most other visiting chef/TV hosts to India, traversing through India and telling new things about the country, is called Spirited Traveller

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Indian
Courtesy: Pixabay.com

New Delhi, March 22, 2017: ‘Spirited Traveller’ on ‘Fox Life’ celebrates the great Indian culinary tradition by celebrity chef Kiran Jethwa, a third-generation Kenyan of Indian origin with fervour.

First it was CNN International and Reza Aslan telling Indians how they pray. Then it was Fox Life and Italian chef David Rocco and Australian Sarah Todd telling Indians how they eat. This is of course not the first time that a westerner has come and waxed eloquent on oriental Indian cuisine. Floyd did it for years. Sweating into various utensils and stoves set up beside the road, cooking up increasingly dodgy curries and telling the free world that that’s how Indians ate.

It was actually defamation through curry.

Yet, it seems that finally we may just have a cooking show with a foreign chef which gets Indian food right. The chef isn’t entirely foreign though, since his name is Kiran Jethwa, who was born to English mother and an Indian father. Which explains the name. But that’s where the Indian-ness stops. Jethwa is a third-generation Kenyan, born in Nairobi and is a chef-restaurateur and like most chef-TV anchors, owns a numerous restaurants in Kenya.

The new show which has him like most other visiting chef/TV hosts to India, traversing through India and telling new things about the country, is called Spirited Traveller. What’s odd is that Fox Life’s sister channel, Nat Geo People, is airing Jethwa’s other show, Fearless Chef, at the same time.

It’s quite an interesting watch. Owing a great deal to the fact that Jethwa is exceedingly easy on the eye, but also to the fact that he doesn’t mess around with the food like David Rocco who made a pasta using coriander leaves and chopped green chili. Or look surprised by Indian practices like Oprah did to see that we eat with our hands!

It is elusive for the research team to keep finding new spots to visit and activities to include in the show. After all, how many different and visually appealing dishes are there in Bengal or Kashmir and how many different stories are there to tell? But one must applaud the Spirited Traveller team, that they’ve managed to find something new in at least the two episodes that they aired. The other problem with a foreign team shooting in India, is that they usually get a local guide or point person whose responsibility it is to make team meet the right people and get the right stories and the facts of the place. The wrong guide will bring one severe ’embarrasment’ such as Aslan telling that all ghats are cremation sites. Fox Life seems to have got its research straight.

The first episode was set in Kerala. Where Jethwa went on the backwaters with fishermen to catch the fish Karimeen by diving into the waters. This was followed by him heading to Kumarakom to taste and extract toddy and then to one of Kerala’s duck farms. The format is simple. Jethwa learns one authentic recipe from an Indian chef – in the case of the Kerala episode, it is chef Naveen who teaches him how to make Karimeen in a banana leaf with a spicy cooked marinade (as opposed to a raw marinade which will be cooked later with the meat). He then ends the episode by cooking a dish with the same ingredients or technique. Following his many travels through Kerala, Jethwa made a duck confit with toddy phulka using the same technique he learnt from Naveen.

The Goa episode had Jethwa give up on travelling through Goa. He instead played a spot of football on the beach and then drank some kokum cocktails and helped cooking a spicy prawn with kokum at a beach shack. He then visited a coconut rum factory and a feni farm. And then a visit to a Goan fish market where he bought a King Mackerel with which he cooked a Kingfish ceviche with kokum pesto, flavoured with Urak, the sour Bimla fruit and chopped white haldi. For a cook, there is nothing as delightful and attractive as seeing someone fillet a fish without a misstep.

In the second episode, one realises the novelty in this show was that the host Jethwa tried quite a lot of alcohols in each state and city. It’s a welcome change from the usual food shows that steer clear of any alcohol being shown. India has different kinds of indigenous alcohols pertaining to different states, it’s a great that a show realised to explore the terrain.

Fox Life seems to have hit on a winner. The next two episodes are in Mumbai and in Nagaland, respectively, and look quite promising.

One can watch Spirited Traveller every Monday and Tuesday at 9pm on Fox Life.

– prepared by Sabhyata Badhwar of NewsGram. Twitter: @SabbyDarkhorse

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15 Things to Watch out for before Gorging on Indian Street Food

Eating street food in India can be a very delightful and exciting experience due to the assortment and taste of foods. Only, some precautions and ideas are to be noted before going street hunting.

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Indian street food. Wikimedia

November 7, 2016: The original taste of Indian cuisine is not found in five-star hotels and restaurants with hefty price tags. On the contrary, it is found in the Indian street food which is an assortment of eatables that you can keep gorging up and never be satisfied with. But of course like most good things in life it has a downside. The downside being health issues like dysentery and diarrhea. So here are 15 important tips to look out for before trying the streets.

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vendors selling hot food

Vendors selling hot food, Wikimedia

  • Avoid food which shows you the cold shoulder: Meaning stay as far as you can from foods which have gone cold. You never know the amount of time it has been left out for the germs to mess around with it.
a food stall in begaluru
A food stall in Bengaluru, Wikimedia
  • Search stalls with people variety:  Try looking out for vendors who have people from different sex and age groups flocking around him. The local people have a pretty good idea of the quality of the food from different vendors so when you see children and women waiting for food, get in the queue.
corns on the cob
corns on the cob, Wikimedia commons
  • Be vegetarian! : Try avoiding meat products as they have the most risk of being spoiled in this tropical weather. The probability of getting fresh meat is pretty low so if you try it,  do so of your own accord. Of course, if you are in Hyderabad and on time near Ramzan please forget this point.
samosas_pakoras_street_food_little_india_canada
samosas and pakoras being sold at street, Wikimedia
  • Dicey Ice: Even if you are parched and dying of thirst, please O please do not drink street drinks with ice in it if you are not a regular of street cuisine. Instead, try searching for a bottled water or if not available go to any reputable looking shop and ask for water. Most people have enough humanity in them that they won’t deny you a glass of water. Ice has a bad reputation of being made from water that is not distilled at the street stalls and trust me your stomach will be thank you if you forgo that ice.
a person selling bhelpuri, by wikimedia commons
a person selling bhelpuri, Wikimedia
  • Avoid places where food is left out for you even before ordering: No you won’t get free food. The food left out was from another customer and they neglected washing it properly. So check the utensils and if the plate in which they are serving you looks unwashed or dirty, ask them for a ‘use ‘and throw’ plate. Most vendors keep them in case some mindful people approach there.
a sugarcane juice extractor
a sugarcane juice extractor,Wikimedia
  • Let them crush it in front of you: Do not drink fruit juice which was leftover, even if the vendor promises you that it is fresh.They lie! So let them crush the fruits in front of you.
a vegetable stall
a vegetable stall, Wikimedia

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  • Don’t be racist, on fruits: When buying fruits remember this saying “All that glitters is not gold!”. You must have heard this proverb before, well it is correct. Don’t judge the quality of fruit by its bright sparkling color. Ask the vendor for a piece to taste it. And if you have the time, choose all you fruits yourselves. Additionally try buying fruits with a peel on it.
A corn seller, by wikimedia commons
A corn seller, by Wikimedia
  • People who fry and cry: See someone frying, or cooking in front of you and a crowd waiting in a glutton ecstasy. Do not think twice, order it and gobble it up.
  • Hand-wash : Never forget the learning you got at home and school. Wash your hands. The vendor must have kept a pail of water, search for it.
a tea cabin, by wikimedia commons
a tea cabin, by Wikimedia
  • Tea, not Coffee: Indian street tea is something to die for. Not literally but choose it instead of coffee as the vendors have more experience making it and the prepare a wicked cup of tea.
  • Follow the crowd: Reach the food market when the crowd is large. Follow the meal times of locals as that is the time of the day when you get the best and freshest food.
a panipuri stand, by wikimedia commons
a panipuri stand, by Wikimedia
  • Don’t be shy: If you cannot decide what to eat after seeing the enormous amount of variety ask some of the locals about the best food there.
  • Uncooked food is Dangerous! : If you get something partially uncooked in your order, do not eat it. Ask them to cook it again or replace it. If they don’t throw it. Some wastage of food is not worthy enough to get sick for.
A paratha stall in Delhi, by wikimedia commons
A paratha stall in Delhi, by Wikimedia
  • Try different variety: We all have that one food that we are crazy for. If you find yourselves crazy for some specific food, all good and well but try alternative foods. Maybe you will find something better than it.
  • PLEASE do not Haggle: The people selling street foods are mostly poor. Please do not haggle over the prices.

– by Gulshan Kumar Alok of NewsGram, Twitter: @AlokGulshan