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Here are 6 Popular Places in Madhya Pradesh for Perfect Temple Wedding!

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Sri Meenakshi temple
Wedding of goddess Meenakshi stucco work in Amman Sannathi of Sri Meenakshi temple ; Madurai. Pixabay
July 14, 2017: Weddings are said to be one of the most sacred occasions in India and the temples have served as the divine venues for the wedding, irrespective of any region, religion or culture. This is due to the holiness associated with temples and many people believe it that doing so will lead to a successful marriage. Another reason why people prefer such venues is to keep the wedding simple, surrounded by close relatives.
The loud trumpet, high pitched songs and the bustling of crackers in ‘Big Fat Indian Wedding’ celebrations add to the pollution and noise and today’s smart generation understands the cons attached with the ‘band baja baraat’ concept.
Couples have started opting out for temple weddings, not only to keep it short and simple but also to avoid the excess noise and pollution as in the case of former. They want it to be the perfect venue for their big day to make it a mesmerizing affair. We bring you some of the best destinations in Madhya Pradesh for a temple wedding.
Madhya Pradesh is one the state which is quite famous for its many historic temples and shrines. The sanctity and the epic view of these temples offer the perfect setting required in a Hindu wedding. It instigates in you a sacred feeling of starting a relationship that binds you and your partner forever.
Khajuraho Temple

Khajuraho. Wikimedia Commons

The temples of Khajuraho are considered to be a commemoration of the wedding of Lord Shiva & Parvati. Undoubtedly the city of Khajuraho tops the list of temple weddings in Madhya Pradesh. Adorned by the ancient heritage it is the city with temples signifying love and erotism. These destinations offer the perfect backdrop essential for an intimate union of a couple who are closely attached to the divine plan of creation. Khajuraho, the perfect example of excellence, prestige and erotic sculptures, is an ideal venue for temple wedding in India. Also, it has been declared as world heritage site by UNESCO.
Matangesvara temple among the temples of Khajuraho is the most suitable venue for temple weddings. Dedicated to Lord Shiva, this temple is known to have the world’s largest shivlings that stand about 8 ft tall and are made up of yellow limestone.
According to Hindu Mythology,  a sage named Matanga highly thought of as Lord Shiva, controlled the God of love by demonstrating himself in the form of a lingam. The temple which carries such a great importance in the history would be a perfect location for making the wedding an unforgettable affair.
Bhojeshwar Temple

Lingam of Bhojeshwar Temple. Wikimedia

Bhojpur is a historical town on the outskirts of Bhopal known for its greenery and the tranquility of the Betwa river. The town has been named after the acclaimed ruler of Paramara dynasty- King Bhoja. The Bhojeshwar temple which is dedicated to Lord Shiva is surrounded by lush greenery. This makes it an attractive place for the wedding.
The Archaeological Survey of India is responsible for the maintenance of this architectural wonder and the most amazing fact about the temple is that the linga inside the temple has been crafted out of a single rock. Apart from the clean surrounding, the crystal clear water of the Betwa river flowing next to the temple provides the perfect ambiance required for a temple wedding in this state.

 

Ahilyeshwar Temple. Wikimedia Commons

Ahilyeshwar Temple
Maheshwar, also known as the temple town, is one of the best wedding destinations due to the historical glory and authenticity of the place. The city has some historical sites which provide the solemn environment suitable for a wedding setup.
The Ahilyeshwar temple is one such place demonstrating the architectural skills of the Marathas. The softness of the Narmada waves adds to the serenity around the temple and makes it one of the desired location for wedding ceremonies.

Chintamann GaneshTemple, Ujjain. Wikimedia

Chintamann Ganesh Temple
The Chintamann Ganesh Temple is an ancient temple situated in Ujjain. Constructed on the Shipra River, it is the largest temple in the area devoted to Lord Ganesha. The simplicity and the soothing environment around makes It is an ideal place to conduct a ritual of the heavenly alliance called marriage.

Raja Ram Mandir. Wikimedia

Raja Ram Mandir
Raja Ram Mandir, also known as the palace temple is located opposite to the Orchha Fort. With the magnificent backdrop of the fort, the temple is the perfect setting for an auspicious day like the wedding.

Veiw of Gwalior city from Gwalior Fort. Wikimedia Commons

Gwalior
Also known as the fort city, Gwalior was founded by a ruler named Maharaja Suraj Sen. The panoramic view of the fort at the top of the hill and the spectacular palaces rule the whole city in terms of attractive sites. It is the host of the pearl of all Indian fortresses and so deserves to stand out as one of the epic locations for getting hitched in the state of Madhya Pradesh.
So, choose these perfect wedding destinations for your big day to make it a mesmerizing affair and a moment to cherish to forever.

by Sabnam Mangla of NewsGram, Twitter: @sabnam_mangla

 

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Bride Sale in India: Buy A Wife Policy

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Human Trafficking
Bride Slavery in India: Abhishek Suresh

Bride Sale: Story of transformation of Indian Bride into Slave Bride

Samridhi Nain

Bride Sale in India seems to be trending in Haryana, a state with the lowest sex ratio, even marriage continues to be a way of exploitation as Indian brides for marriage are purchased at cattle rate and trafficked into the states of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, and Punjab.
These ‘brides’ are imported from poverty-stricken states like Jharkhand, Bihar, Orrisa, West Bengal & Assam, where the traffickers either take advantage of the family’s poverty or abduct the young girls varying anywhere between the ages of 15 and 30, according to 2013 National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).
The bride sale practice has been completely normal in the northern states due to the acute shortage of girls because of practices like sex selection and female foeticide. But if the reports are to be believed then even if not a single case of female foeticide takes place in Haryana, it would still take 50 years to get the numbers back to normal from India’s sex ratio today. However, the problem remains as locals & Khap leaders keep refusing to accept the facts at hand. Some believe it is the education of women that is the root problem because they want to marry a man who is also well-educated, whereas some believe that there has always been a shortage of girls but before where one woman would take care of five brothers, now, it requires five separate women to do the same.
As Haryana keeps preferring the male child and that male child grows up to prefer a bride, the best solution available at hand remains of these women who are bought at a price varying on their age, beauty & virginity and once bought, they are turned into a slave bride. Once married, these women can be resold as they are not viewed as a respected member but a commodity as they are not considered to be entitled to any inheritance by the family.

Human Trafficking to Bride Sale
Stencil of Missing Girls Project, Wikimedia Commons

A field study, covering 92 villages of Mahendragarh, Sirsa, Karnal, Sonipat & Mewat districts had been conducted on the impact of the sex ratio on marriage which covered over 10,000 households and found that 9,000 married women were bought from other states. The study was conducted by NGO Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra but the families kept denying of any exchange of money for the bride.
In 2016, the ministry of women and child development came up with India’s first comprehensive anti-trafficking laws under ‘Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection & Rehabilitation) Bill, 2016 but the bill faces many challenges and is believed to not achieve its objectives of preventing trafficking & providing protection & rehabilitation to trafficked victims. Activists also believe that the bill will be able to do very little to stop the bride sale.
With such haunting demographics at hand, the hope still remains that sooner or later, the government might realize the need for stringent implementation of the rules & regulations to stop the violation of these young women at the hands of sex traffickers and quell this ‘Buy A Bride’ policy.
-Samridhi is a student of Philosophy Hons. at the University of Delhi.

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Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here

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hindus
Hinduism. Pixabay

Oct 06, 2017: Have you ever wondered what being a Hindu means? Or who is actually fit to be called a Hindu? Over centuries, Hindus and Indians alike have asked this question to themselves or their elders at least once in their lifetime.

In the 1995 ruling of the case, “Bramchari Sidheswar Shai and others Versus State of West Bengal” the court identified seven defining characteristics of Hinduism but people are still confused to what exactly defines being a Hindu in the 21st century. It’s staggering how uninformed individuals can be about their own religion; according to a speech by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya there are various common notions we carry about who a Hindu is:

  • Anyone born in India is automatically a Hindu
  • If your parents are Hindu, you’re are also inevitably a Hindu
  • If you believe in reincarnation, you’re a Hindu
  • If you follow any religion practiced in India, you’re a Hindu
  • And lastly, if you are born in a certain caste, you’re a Hindu

After answering these statements some fail to remove their doubts on who a Hindu is. The question arises when someone is unsure on how to portray themselves in the society, many people follow a set of notions which might/might not be the essence of Hinduism and upon asked why they perform a particular ritual they are clueless. The problem is that the teachings are passed on for generations and the source has been long forgotten, for the source is exactly where the answer lies.

Religion corresponds to scriptural texts

The world is home to many religions and each religion has its own uniqueness portrayed out of the scriptures and teachings which are universally accepted. So to simplify the dilemma one can say that determining whether someone belongs to a particular religion is directly related to whether he/she follows the religious scriptures of the particular religion, and also whether they abide to live by the authority of the scriptural texts.

Christianity emerges from the guidance of the Gospels and Islam from the Quran where Christians believe Jesus died for their sins and Muslims believe there is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet. Similarly, Hinduism emerges from a set of scriptures known as the Vedas and a Hindu is one who lives according to Dharma which is implicated in the divine laws in the Vedic scriptures.By default, the person who follows these set of religious texts is a Hindu.

Also Read: Christianity and Islam don’t have room for a discourse. Hindus must Stop Pleasing their former Christian or Muslim masters, says Maria Wirth 

Vedas distinguishes Hindu from a Non-Hindu

Keeping this definition in mind, all the Hindu thinkers of the traditional schools of Hindu philosophy accept and also insist on accepting the Vedas as a scriptural authority for distinguishing Hindus from Non-Hindus. Further implying the acceptance of the following of Bhagwat Gita, Ramayana, Puranas etc as a determining factor by extension principle as well.

Bottom Line

So, concluding the debate on who is a Hindu we can say that a person who believes in the authority of the Vedas and lives by the Dharmic principles of the Vedas is a Hindu. Also implying that anyone regardless of their nationality i.e. American, French or even Indian can be called a Hindu if they accept the Vedas.

– Prepared by Tanya Kathuria of Newsgram                                                                

(the article was originally written by Shubhamoy Das and published by thoughtco)

One response to “Are We Hindus If We Live in India? The Answer to Contentious Question is Here”

  1. Hindu is a historical name for people living “behind the river Indus”. So, everyone living in India is a Hindu, eventhough he might have a different faith.

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Strange Rituals: Demon King Ravana is Worshipped on Dussehra

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dussehra
Effigy of Ravana burns. Dussehra. Wikimedia

Sep 30, 2017: Vijayadashami or Dussehra is celebrated with fervor at the end of Navratri every year. The festival is observed by burning the puppet of King Ravana. While at some places, the celebration of good over evil is celebrated by burning effigy of the demon king, there are some places where Ravana is worshipped on this occasion. It is predisposed amongst the followers that all their wishes come true on this day.

Also Read: Ram and Ravana Have More In Common Than You Think: 5 Traits of the Anti-Hero Ravana That You Must Learn | Dussehra Special

Every year on Dussehra, the 125-year-old Dashanan temple in Shivala area of Kanpur is opened for its devotees. An idol of King Ravana is ornamented, and aarti is performed. Devotees perform religious rituals and light lamps to celebrate the festival. The temple remains closed following the burning of Ravana’s statue.

Dashanan Temple was constructed in 1890 by king Guru Prasad Shukl. The rationale behind the construction of Dashanan temple was Ravana’s adherence towards Lord Shiva.

King Ravana is worshipped at many places in India, for example: In Andhra Pradesh’s Kakinada, a huge shivalinga established by Ravana is revered along with the demon-king. Vidisha, a village in Madhya Pradesh is dedicated to King Ravana. In this village, the first wedding card invitation is sent to Ravana before the commencement of any celebration. Neither the devotees burn dummies of King Ravana, nor do they celebrate Dussehra.