Wednesday September 26, 2018

Beware! Frequent dining out can harm your health

The new study looked more broadly at dining out -- not just at fast-food outlets -- and found that it was significantly associated with increased exposure to phthalates

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Dining out regularly can harm your health. IANS
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  • Frequent dining out can affect your health
  • It can have a bad effect on your health
  • High level of phthalates is the cause of this

Next time you order a sandwich from your favourite fast food joint or plan a dinner with your friends at a nearby restaurant, you must give a try to home-cooked meal first.

According to researchers, dining out more at restaurants, cafeterias and fast-food outlets may boost total levels of potentially health-harming chemicals called “phthalates” in the body, especially among pregnant women, children and teenagers.

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Dining out is not as good as it may seem.

“Phthalates”, a group of chemicals used in food packaging and processing materials, are known to disrupt hormones in humans and are linked to a long list of health problems. “This study suggests food prepared at home is less likely to contain high levels of ‘phthalates’, chemicals linked to fertility problems, pregnancy complications and other health issues,” said senior author Ami Zota, Assistant Professor of Environmental and Occupational Health at Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University.

For the study, published in the journal Environment International, researchers used data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected between 2005 and 2014. The 10,253 participants in the study were asked to recall what they ate and where their food came from in the previous 24 hours.

Also Read: Food Preservative Shows Promise In Schizophrenia Treatment

The researchers then analysed the links between what people ate and the levels of phthalate break-down products found in each participant’s urine sample. The team found that 61 percent of the participants reported dining out the previous day.

The study found that sandwiches consumed at fast food outlets, restaurants or cafeterias were associated with 30 per cent higher phthalate levels in all age groups. The researchers also found the association between phthalate exposure and dining out was significant for all age groups but the magnitude of association was highest for teenagers. Adolescents who were high consumers of fast food and other food purchased outside the home had 55 per cent higher levels of phthalates compared to those who only consumed food at home.

Remain healthy during winter with these healthy tips
Homemade food is healthier. wikimedia commons

“Pregnant women, children and teens are more vulnerable to the toxic effects of hormone-disrupting chemicals, so it’s important to find ways to limit their exposures,” said lead author Julia Varshavsky who did the work while she was at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health. A previous study by Zota and colleagues suggested that fast food may expose consumers to higher levels of phthalates.

The new study looked more broadly at dining out — not just at fast-food outlets — and found that it was significantly associated with increased exposure to phthalates. The findings are worrisome because two-thirds of the US population eats at least some food outside the home daily, the authors warned. IANS

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Paralyzed Patients Start Walking Following A New Treatment

the researchers say this is not a cure for paralysis, and caution that it may not work on every patient. They say more study is needed.

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Paralyzed
A wheelchair sits in the viewing area at a golf course, June 19, 2017. Medical researchers are working to stimulate the spinal cord to allow paralyzed patients to stand and walk.. VOA

U.S. researchers are reporting progress in helping those paralyzed by spinal cord injuries to stand, and even to take steps.

Two teams of medical researchers working separately say an electrical implant that stimulates the spinal cord allowed three paralyzed patients to stand and move forward while they held on to a walker or were supported from the back.

One patient was able to walk the length of a football field.

“Recovery can happen if you have the right circumstances,” University of Louisville professor Susan Harkema said, adding that the spinal cord can “relearn to do things.”

Paralyzed
Bionic exoskeleton helps wheelchair users stand and walk. Flickr

Experts say that a damaged spinal cord leaves the brain unable to send messages to the nerves that activate the muscles.

The researchers believe those nerves are still alive, but are asleep.

Stimulating them with electricity, along with intense rehabilitation, can wake up those sleeping nerves and enable them to receive commands again.

Other earlier treatments using electricity allowed patients to stand and move their toes, but not walk.

Paralyzed
Experts say that a damaged spinal cord leaves the brain unable to send messages to the nerves that activate the muscles.

But the researchers say this is not a cure for paralysis, and caution that it may not work on every patient. They say more study is needed.

Also Read: HP Launches Game Changing 3D Printing Technology

Reports on the new therapy appear in the New England Journal of Medicine and the journal Nature Medicine. (VOA)