Tuesday January 23, 2018
Home Opinion Biased media?...

Biased media? AAP termed ‘devil’ but no debates on LG’s moves

1
//
81
Republish
Reprint

By Dr. Kallol Guha

The tussle between the Delhi government and the Lieutenant Governor has been a topic of discussion on the news channels. The discussions seem to point that people’s aspirations, rights, privileges and quality of life are not the goals of any truly independent and free nation and this has always been a ‘fundamental’ issue.  In turn, it is the role of the citizens to serve the constitution, no matter how oppressive it might be.

The so-called experts argue – some passionately, some hysterically- to establish that the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) is wrong, support the Lieutenant Governor, Najeeb Jung. AAP has been showered with allegations that they can’t govern and are not a team player with words like ‘inexperienced’ and ‘anarchist’ being thrown around. No debate ever bothered to emphasize on the views which AAP has been trying to communicate to the public and propose to investigate to protect the interest of the people.

There are certain questions that media should raise with respect to this tussle. AAP has claimed to have busted the racket, which controlled transfer postings of SGM in lucrative areas that were not done on the basis of public interest, but was an industry where such decisions were made through bribery. The Lieutenant Governor reportedly used his influence to get control over transfer posting. Isn’t it pertinent to ask whether Lieutenant Governor is aware of the transfer posting industry?  If posting has indeed taken the shape of an industry and influenced by bribery has AAP done anything wrong? Why does Lieutenant Governor want to take over that responsibility from AAP?

The mainstream media has failed to highlight that when the Anti-Corruption Bureau (ACB) prosecuted a constable, who was caught red- handed while taking bribe and was taken into custody, the Lieutenant Governor’s office along with the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) appealed to the Supreme Court  for his bail.

Lieutenant Governor had made all preparations to transfer ACB office under its own control until the High Court ruling prevented that transfer. AAP said that Delhi Government has jurisdiction over Anti Corruption Bureau (ACB). Shouldn’t this kind of behaviour of the Lieutenant Governor be discussed in public?

While AAP claims that they have organized Mohalla Sabha and are trying to engage common people in running their day to day administration of daily life, has the Lieutenant Governor made any efforts to support such practices? Or has he tried to evaluate the public reaction to such Sabhas?

No debate or discussion has been held to check whether actions of Lieutenant Governor or AAP are helping the common man to make things easier for the common man. In one debate, a Congress spokesperson complained that areas in Delhi have no water, electricity and sewer lines and AAP has not done anything to improve such condition. No reporter, viewer or panellist bothered to point to the Congress spokesperson that ask how can she be so shameless even to ask such a question when Congress politicians were swindling and looting the nation since 1947. They did not install such basic amenities and expect others to do that in 100 days under collective siege.

Referring to the statement of a former Congress Minister who at a rare moment of honesty said during the cabinet discussion on land acquisition that for industry in tribal areas one gets the impression as if there are no habitation on the land in question, they do not even exist. This is a very significant observation. Make no mistake, in the tussle between the Lieutenant Governor and Delhi Government one may see same approach. People in the Lieutenant Governor camp might feel that people’s role is to serve Parliament, Constitution and law, no matter how oppressive or harmful that might be. Not the other way around.

Instead of these pertinent issues, flowery words are used to determine whether the water in the bottle or bottle is in the water?  These worthless wordy discussions will continue as long as they are helpful to confuse people so that common people may be distracted from identifying who is out to strangle them with a mask of “DEMOCRACY, CONSTITUTION, FREEDOM.”

Truth is no one gives your right, you have to fight for it. This truth is manifesting itself in here as well. Time has come for people to decide whether they will allow themselves to be fooled continuously or identify who are with them and who are not.

NOTE: The views expressed here are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of NewsGram.

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

  • Neeru Bahl

    I think media houses should read this masterpiece , may be they get some enlightenment!

Next Story

15 Amazing facts about Indian National Song: Vande Mataram

The National song of India, Vande Mataram is considered as the foundation of encouragement to the people in their struggle for freedom.

0
//
22
Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram. Wikimedia Commons
Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram. Wikimedia Commons
  • Vande Mataram was originally written in 1876 and appeared in Anandamath in 1881
  • Well before the Congress’ Varanasi session on September 7, 1905, Vande Mataram was adopted as the `National Song’ and won India’s heart as its war cry of freedom
  • Poet Sarala Devi Chaudurani sang the national song in the Benares Congress Session in 1905

‘Vande Mataram’, is no less than an epic for our country and holds a special place in the heart of every Indian. The first two words of the title itself are sufficient to induce a great feeling of patriotism.

It would be a surprise for many to know that September 7, 2006, was not the centenary of Vande Mataram. On the contrary, Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay wrote the lyrics of Vande Mataram well before he penned Anandamath, his novel, which described unified Bengal’s sanyasi uprising against tyrannical Muslim rule in the 1770s.

For better clarification, Vande Mataram was originally written in 1876 and appeared in Anandamath in 1881.

The National song was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math. Wikimedia Commons
Vande Mataram was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math. Wikimedia Commons

Thus, 2006 was not the 100th year of Vande Mataram, but the 129th anniversary of the `National Song”, which was first recited at the Indian National Congress session of 1896.

Also Read: 10 Must Knowing Facts about Indian Flag

Well before the Congress’ Varanasi session on September 7, 1905, Vande Mataram was adopted as the `National Song’ and won India’s heart as its war cry of freedom.

On January 24, 1950, it was brought at par with the National Anthem officially by the Constituent Assembly.

The protest against Vande Mataram because of its ‘idolatrous’ content began in the 1890s. The Congress party surrendered before Islamic opposition at its Kakinada session in 1923 not only on the Vande Mataram issue but also to all symbols and values held national.

The recent HRD ministerial diktat to compulsorily sing the song throughout the country occupied much media space and ignited a debate on India’s national song’s journey over the last 130 years.

Also Read: 15 Amazing Facts About The Revolutionary Bhagat Singh

The song served as a source of immense strength and inspiration for freedom fighters before India gained freedom.

The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002. Wikimedia Commons
The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002. Wikimedia Commons

Take a look at some of the glorious facts related to our National song, ‘Vande Mataram’.

  1. The National song, ‘Vande Mataram’ was written by the great Bengali poet and writer, Bankim Chandra Chatterjee.
  2. On January 24, 1950, it was adopted as the National Song of India.
  3. The National song of India, Vande Mataram is considered as the foundation of encouragement to the people in their struggle for freedom. The National song of India is versed in the Sanskrit and Bengali languages, in the novel ‘Anandmath’ by Bankim Chandra Chatterji.
  4. The former President of India, Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration in the Constituent Assembly that the song Vande Mataram, which had played a significant part in the historic freedom struggle held in India, should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it.
  5. The National song was a part of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s most famous novel Anand Math (1882) which is set in the events of Sannyasi rebellion.
  6. The first translation of Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s novel Anand Math, into English was done by Nares Chandra Sen-Gupta, in 1906.
  7. In the 1896 session of the Indian National Congress, it was the first political event when the National song was sung. On the same occasion, the national song of India was first sung by the Rabindranath Tagore.
  8. Poet Sarala Devi Chaudurani sang the national song in the Benares Congress Session in 1905.
  9. The Iron Man of India, Lala Lajpat Rai, published a journal called Vande Mataram from Lahore.

    Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration that Vande Mataram should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it. Wikimedia Commons
    Dr. Rajendra Prasad, on January 24, 1950, came up with a declaration that Vande Mataram should be honoured equally with Jana Gana Mana and must give equal status to it. Wikimedia Commons
  10. Vande Mataram was recited in the first political film made by Hiralal Sen in 1905.
  11. The Sangh Parivar, better known as the Rashtriya Swayam Sewak Sangh (RSS) celebrated the 125th anniversary of the song in 2002.
  12. Two stanzas of the original song have been officially declared as the National Song of India in 1950 after the independence of India.
  13. The song was originally written in two languages, Sanskrit and Bengali, in the novel ‘Anandmath’.
  14. It was also sung by the Dakhina Charan Sen in 1901 after five years during another Congress meeting at Calcutta.
  15. India’s first political film Hiralal Senmade, made in 1905 ends with the chant Vande Mataram.