Saturday December 7, 2019
Home Business Big Business ...

Big Business and Politics Mass-Mining Everyday Data from Facebook Likes to Online Subscriptions

There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think

0
//
netflix
FILE - The Netflix logo is seen on their office in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. VOA

Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released on Wednesday.

“The Great Hack” says personal data has surpassed oil as the world’s most valuable asset, and warns viewers that companies and governments are hacking into way more than computers.

“There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think. If you don’t understand how you think, they will think for you,” said directors Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim. “It’s not just our computers that have been hacked, it’s our minds,” they said in a statement.

The two-hour documentary — showing on the Netflix streaming video platform — examines the state of privacy in the United States and Europe, where people spend much of their time online, volunteering countless nuggets of exploitable information.

Business, Politics, Data
Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released. Pixabay

It centers on the Cambridge Analytica affair, which saw an international consultancy target undecided voters in the Brexit referendum and 2016 U.S. election, partly using Facebook data.

Facebook Inc agreed on Wednesday to pay a $100 million fine to settle charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it misled investors about the misuse of its users’ data related to Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook did not admit or deny wrongdoing in agreeing to settle.

“Social media companies harvest millions of people’s personal data and sell it to the highest bidder. Personal data is being used on a mass scale to manipulate and influence people,” said Silkie Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, a British civil liberties group.

Also Read- New Space Race Underway to Exploit Skies for Commercial Profit

“Data-driven manipulation of populations is not only the reserve of shady start-ups, disturbingly, it is becoming the modus operandi in modern politics.”

Directors Amer and Noujaim first came to prominence for their Academy Award nominated film “The Square,” which looked at social media as a catalyst for the 2011 Egyptian uprisings.

“We ultimately made a film about whether we have free will. It’s about democracy and it’s about complicity,” they said of their latest documentary. “These are arguably the most important questions of our time.” (VOA)

Next Story

India Ranked 5th Worst Country For Use of Biometric Data: Comparitech Report

India is the 5th worst country for biometric data collection

0
India biometric
India is ranked the 5th worst country for the use of biometric data. Pixabay

India is the fifth worst country after China, Malaysia, Pakistan and the US in terms of extensive and invasive use of biometric data, according to a new report from Britain-based tech research firm Comparitech on Wednesday.

India shares the fifth position with Taiwan, Indonesia and the Philippines, said the study.

India ranked relatively lower in the list of worst countries for biometric data collection as it does not permit law enforcement to get access to the national biometric database known as Aadhaar.

For the study, the researchers analysed 50 different countries to find out where biometrics are being taken, what they are being taken for, and how they are being stored.

Each country has been scored out of 25, with high scores indicating extensive and invasive use of biometrics and/or surveillance and a low score demonstrating better restrictions and regulations regarding biometric use and surveillance.

India ranking
India ranked relatively lower in the list of worst countries for biometric data collection as it does not permit law enforcement to get access to the national biometric database. Pixabay

Among the factors used for scoring the countries, the researchers looked at whether the country failed to introduce a law to protect biometric data.

While China scored 24 out of 25, India scored 19.

Despite many countries recognising biometric data as sensitive, increased biometric use is widely accepted, said the study.

Also Read- Top 5 B. Tech Specialisations in India

Countries in the European Union scored better overall than non-EU countries due to General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulations protecting the use of biometrics at the workplace to some extent.

Ireland, Portugal, Cyprus, the UK and Romania emerged as the five best countries in terms of collection, storage and use of biometric data, the results showed. (IANS)