Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Bimagrumab is an antibody that blocks activin type II receptors. Pixabay

Researchers have found that treatment with Bimagrumab is safe and effective for treating excess adiposity and metabolic disturbances of adult patients with obesity and Type-2 diabetes. Bimagrumab is an antibody that blocks activin type II receptors and stimulates skeletal muscle growth.

“These exciting results suggest that there may be a novel mechanism for achieving weight loss with a profound loss of body fat and an increase in lean mass, along with other metabolic benefits,” said researcher Steve Heymsfield from Pennington Biomedical Research Center, in the US.


Follow NewsGram on Instagram to keep yourself updated.

For the study, published in the JAMA Network Open journal, a total of 75 patients with Type-2 diabetes, body mass index between 28 and 40, and glycated hemoglobin A1c levels between 6.5 percent and 10 percent were selected for the phase 2 randomized clinical trial. Patients were injected with either Bimagrumab or a placebo (a dextrose solution) every 4 weeks for 48 weeks. Both groups received diet and exercise counseling.

ALSO READ: Study: More Than Half Of Healthcare Workers Are At Risk For Mental Health

At the end of the 48-week study, researchers found a nearly 21 percent decrease in body fat in the Bimagrumab group compared to 0.5 percent in the placebo group. The results also revealed the Bimagrumab group gained 3.6 percent of lean mass compared with a loss of 0.8 percent in the placebo group. The combined loss in total body fat and gain in a lean mass led to a net 6.5 percent reduction in body weight in patients receiving Bimagrumab compared with 0.8 percent weight loss in their counterparts receiving the placebo. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia Commons

The most popular version of the rhyme/lullaby

As children, singing the rhyme Rock A Bye Baby was a fun thing to do. It was a statement of thrill and adventure to imagine a child climbing to the top of a tree and rocking to sleep. Especially in the Indian context, rocking a baby to sleep by attaching the cradle to the tree is quite a common thing. But the origin of this rhyme, or lullaby, seems rooted in other histories.

The most popular notion associated with this lullaby is of women leaving their babies tied to tree branches, rocking to sleep with the wind. It is believed that at the time this lullaby was written, it was inspired by a coloniser who saw the Native American women tie their children in birch bark cradles to the trees. The babies went to sleep rocked by the gusts of wind while the parents went about their tasks.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

This image released by Disney Theatrical Productions shows, from second left, Michael James Scott as Genie, Michael Maliakel as Aladdin, and Shoba Narayan as Jasmine after a performance of the Broadway musical "Aladdin" in New York on Sept. 28, 2021

As kids growing up in different states, Shoba Narayan and Michael Maliakel shared a love of one favorite film — "Aladdin." Both are of Indian descent, and in the animated movie, they saw people who looked like them.

That shared love has gone full-circle this month as Narayan and Maliakel lead the Broadway company of the musical "Aladdin" out of the pandemic, playing Princess Jasmine and the hero from the title, respectively.

Keep Reading Show less
VOA

Bottles of Jack Daniel's whiskeys are displayed at Rossi's Deli in San Francisco

Jack Daniel's is the world's most popular whiskey brand, but until recently, few people knew the liquor was created by Nathan "Nearest" Green, an enslaved Black man who mentored Daniel.

"We've always known," says Debbie Staples, a great-great-granddaughter of Green's who heard the story from her grandmother. … "He made the whiskey, and he taught Jack Daniel. And people didn't believe it … it's hurtful. I don't know if it was because he was a Black man."

Keep reading... Show less