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New Study Shows That Binaries From Globular Clusters Can be Detected by LISA

The European Space Agency's next-generation Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector can potentially detect dozens of binary files in the globular clusters of the Milky Way, scientists say.

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In particular, these models suggest that the Kuiper Belt -- a cold region beyond the orbit of Neptune -- should contain a small fraction of rocky bodies from the inner solar system, such as carbon-rich asteroids, referred to as carbonaceous asteroids.
representational image, pixabay
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The European Space Agency’s next-generation Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) gravitational wave detector can potentially detect dozens of binary files in the globular clusters of the Milky Way, scientists say.

Globular clusters are dense environments containing millions of tightly packed stars and are efficient factories for gravitational wave sources.

LISA, which is expected to be in space in 2034, will be able to detect binary sources — pairs of orbiting compact objects.

These binary sources will contain all combinations of black hole, neutron star and white dwarf components.

While 150 globular clusters have been observed so far in the Milky Way, one out of every three clusters will produce a LISA source.
Representational image. Pixabay

LISA will also be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)

“LISA is sensitive to Milky Way systems and will expand the breadth of the gravitational wave spectrum, allowing us to explore different types of objects that aren’t observable with LIGO,” said lead author Kyle Kremer, a doctoral student at the Northwestern University in Illinois, US.

While 150 globular clusters have been observed so far in the Milky Way, one out of every three clusters will produce a LISA source.

Approximately eight black hole binaries will be detectable by LISA in our neighbouring galaxy of Andromeda and another 80 in nearby Virgo, the study showed.

The research, published by the journal Physical Review Letters, is the first to use realistic globular cluster models to make detailed predictions of LISA sources.

Also Read: NASA Is Sending a Helicopter to Mars in 2020 

The team used more than a hundred fully evolved globular cluster models with properties similar to those of the observed globular clusters in the Milky Way.

The models were run on Quest, Northwestern’s supercomputer cluster. This powerful resource can evolve the full 12 billion years of a globular cluster’s life in a matter of days. (IANS)

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NASA positive on next planet-hunting mission launch

The spacecraft will be looking for a phenomenon known as a transit, where a planet passes in front of its star, causing a periodic and regular dip in the star's brightness

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NASA, Pixabay

Meteorologists with the US Air Force 45th Space Wing have predicted an 80 per cent chance of favourable weather for SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket’s launch with NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite aimed at detecting planets outside our solar system.

ISS is a permanent base for astronauts stationed in the outer sky. Wikimedia Commons
This mission has NASA very positive. Wikimedia Commons

The launch is scheduled for Sunday at 6.32 p.m. (4.02 a.m. on Monday, India time) on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The primary weather concern for the launch day are strong winds, NASA said in a statement late Saturday. The survey, also known as Tess, is NASA’s next step in the search for exoplanets, including those that could support life.

Once in orbit, Tess will spend about two years surveying 200,000 of the brightest stars near the Sun to search for planets outside our solar system. Tess will find the most promising exoplanets orbiting relatively nearby stars, giving future researchers a rich set of new targets for more comprehensive follow-up studies, including the potential to assess their capacity to harbour life.

Also Read: NASA sending first-ever mission to study Mars’ deep interior

With the help of a gravitational assist from the Moon, the spacecraft will settle into a 13.7-day orbit around Earth, NASA said in an earlier statement. Sixty days after the launch and following tests of its instruments, the satellite will begin its initial two-year mission. Four wide-field cameras will give Tess a field-of-view that covers 85 per cent of our entire sky.

NASA Kepler spaceship will be used.

Within this vast visual perspective, the sky has been divided into 26 sectors that Tess will observe one by one. The first year of observations will map the 13 sectors encompassing the southern sky, and the second year will map the 13 sectors of the northern sky.

The spacecraft will be looking for a phenomenon known as a transit, where a planet passes in front of its star, causing a periodic and regular dip in the star’s brightness. NASA’s Kepler spacecraft used the same method to spot more than 2,600 confirmed exoplanets, most of them orbiting faint stars 300 to 3,000 light-years away. IANS