Sunday February 23, 2020

New Bioactive Peptide May Prevent Dental Cavity and Tooth Decay

Researchers develop new gel to maintain dental health

0
//
Tooth decay
Researchers have developed a bioactive peptide that coats tooth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Researchers have developed a bioactive peptide that coats teeth surfaces, helping prevent new cavities and heal existing ones in lab experiments.

Cavities, or dental caries, are the most widespread non-communicable disease globally, according to the World Health Organisation.

Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist’s office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, teeth loss, infection, and even illness or death.

Conventional treatment for dental cavities involves removing decayed tissue and filling the hole with materials, such as amalgam or composite resin.

However, this procedure can damage healthy tissue and cause severe discomfort for patients.

Tooth decay
Having a cavity drilled and filled at the dentist’s office can be painful, but untreated caries could lead to worse pain, tooth loss, infection, and even illness or death. Pixabay

For the findings, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, research team from the Hong Kong University in China, wanted to develop a two-pronged strategy to prevent and treat tooth decay.

Prevent colonisation of the tooth surface by the plaque-forming bacteria that cause cavities, and reduce demineralisation, or the dissolving of tooth enamel, while increasing remineralisation, or repair, said study researchers Hai Ming Wong and Quan Li Li .

The researchers based their anti-cavity coating on a natural antimicrobial peptide called H5.

Produced by human salivary glands, H5 can adsorb onto tooth enamel and destroy a broad range of bacteria and fungi.

To promote remineralisation, the team added a phosphoserine group to one end of H5, which they thought could help attract more calcium ions to repair the enamel than natural H5.

According to the study, they tested the modified peptide on slices of human molars.

Compared with natural H5, the new peptide adsorbed more strongly to the tooth surface, killed more bacteria and inhibited their adhesion, and protected teeth from demineralisatios, the study said.

Also Read- Twitter to Clearview AI: Stop Downloading Images to Build Facial Recognition Database

Surprisingly, however, both peptides promoted remineralisation to a similar degree.

After brushing, people could someday apply the modified peptide to their teeth as a varnish or gel to protect against tooth decay, the researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Tooth Loss Linked To Greater Risk Of Cardiovascular Disease

The causal association between oral disease and cardiovascular disease is not well known, so researchers in a study conducted a secondary analysis

0
Cardiovascular Disease
Missing teeth are more likely to develop Cardiovascular Disease, even after adjusting for other Lifestyle factors such as body mass index, age, race, alcohol consumption, smoking, diabetes and dental visits. Pixabay

Researchers have found that adults who have lost teeth due to non-traumatic reasons might have a higher risk of developing Cardiovascular Disease (CVD).

“If a person’s teeth fall out, there may be other underlying health concerns. Clinicians should be recommending that people in this age group receive adequate oral health care to prevent the diseases that lead to tooth loss in the first place and as potentially another way of reducing risk of future cardiovascular disease,” said study lead author Hamad Mohammed Qabha, MBBS from Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University.

The causal association between oral disease and cardiovascular disease is not well known, so researchers in this study conducted a secondary analysis of the 2014 Behaviour Risk Factor Surveillance System that looked at tooth loss not caused by trauma, as well as cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, angina and stroke.

The study included 316,588 participants from the US and territories between the ages of 40-79.

Cardiovascular Disease
Researchers have found that adults who have lost teeth due to non-traumatic reasons might have a higher risk of developing Cardiovascular Disease (CVD). Pixabay

Overall eight per cent were edentulous (had no teeth) and 13 per cent had cardiovascular disease.

The percentage of people who had cardiovascular disease and were edentulous was 28 per cent, compared to only seven per cent who had cardiovascular disease but did not have missing teeth.

ALSO READ: Apple Plans To Bundle AirPods with iPhone 12

In addition to edentulous participants, those who reported having one to five missing teeth or six or more, but not all, missing teeth were also more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, even after adjusting for other factors such as body mass index, age, race, alcohol consumption, smoking, diabetes and dental visits. (IANS)