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Bisexuals are at Greatest Risk of Suffering from Mental Health Problems, Suggest Studies

Bisexuals- Sexual minority community, who are at the greatest risk of falling into depression

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Bisexuals
Bisexuals get subjected to more discrimination than other communities of the society. Pixabay.
  • Studies reveal that the social stigma of bisexuals have lead to cases of mental illness becoming prevalent among people of their community.
  • Their decision is questioned by both heterosexuals and homosexuals.

A recent study done by researchers of an American university has stated that the “B” (Bisexuals) in the LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) community are people, most prone to falling into depression or suffer from mental illness. The research published in Prevention Science is based on data collected from 503 participants aged 18 to 64, who identified themselves as bisexuals, people attracted to both men and women. They were questioned as to how their bisexuality affected their lives. And, many said that they were invalidated and often looked down upon.

Also Read:  5 Women Whose Caliber, Achievements Would Inspire You 

Various studies have proven that Bisexual people are more mentally affected than homosexuals or heterosexuals. They feel as if they do not have an identity or they believe in one society. The preconceived notion of bisexuals being a threat to the society and incapable of commitment affects them the most. They are called promiscuous, and their sexuality is considered illegitimate.

A qualitative study conducted with 55 bisexual people across Ontario revealed the typical stereotype- individuals who are confused and unsure of their desires. The participants of the study expressed the strange reactions coming from their families. They are being ignored and relegated by both heterosexuals and homosexuals. Their community needs a separate identity, and support like other communities do. Their needs and place in the society are not identified as much those of the Lesbian, Gay and Transgender community.

The stereotypes against them have made them socially isolated leading to severe mental illness.A Canadian study states that bisexual men and women are 6.3 times and 5.9 times respectively, are more likely to have suicidal tendencies than heterosexual people.  A Bisexuality report of 2012 suggests Bi people are more likely to suffer from depression as compared to homosexuals.

As individuals, it becomes our social responsibility to willfully respect the people who have identified themselves as being bisexuals or any characteristic different from ours. Stereotypical and hurtful comments can never be the mark of a progressive society. After all when we all were born with the same fundamental and human rights, where we have the right to choose.

-by Megha Acharya of NewsGram. Twitter @ImMeghaacharya.


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“Botswana”, a Fourth African Country to Decriminalize Gay Sex, Boosts Hope for Equal Rights

Addressing the court Tuesday, Judge Michael Leburu said Botswana needed to embrace diversity and promote tolerance

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gay sex
An activist holds up a rainbow flag to celebrate inside Botswana High Court in Gaborone on June 11, 2019. Botswana's Court ruled on June 11 in favour of decriminalising homosexuality, handing down a landmark verdict greeted with joy by gay rights… An activist holds up a rainbow flag to celebrate inside Botswana High Court in Gaborone on June 11, 2019. Botswana's Court ruled on June 11 in favour of decriminalising homosexuality, handing down a landmark verdict greeted with joy by gay rights. VOA

Botswana’s High Court on Tuesday overturned colonial-era laws that made gay sex illegal. Botswana is the fourth African country to decriminalize homosexual relations, and the first to do so through the courts.

Addressing the court Tuesday, Judge Michael Leburu said Botswana needed to embrace diversity and promote tolerance. Letsweletse Motshidiemang, a 24-year-old university student, had challenged two of the southern African country’s colonial-era laws. The laws, though rarely enforced, made gay sex punishable by up to seven years in prison.

Motshidiemang’s lawyer, Tshiamo Rantao, hailed the judgment. “There shall be no discrimination based on sexual orientation from now henceforth,” he said.  “The parliament had already done so when it prohibited discrimination in the employment arena, on the basis of sexual orientation. It is a progressive decision; I am sure it will be celebrated all over the world.”

gay sex
Activists leave Botswana High Court in Gaborone, June 11, 2019. VOA

Lesbians, Gays and Bisexuals of Botswana (LEGABIBO) spokesperson Cain Youngman said the ruling was a win for equal rights. “It basically puts us at par with the rest of the community. It was not about asking for any special rights, we were asking to be equal to other Botswana, period,” Youngman said. The case removed Section 164 and 165 of Botswana’s penal code, which was similar to anti-gay laws in other former British colonies.

Around Africa

Kenya’s high court in May upheld its colonial-era laws against gay sex, dealing a blow to activists’ hopes it would lead the expansion of gay rights in Africa. Botswana gay rights activist Katlego Kolanyane-Kesupile, who underwent gender transformation, said Tuesday’s ruling was a victory for everyone.

“I am really happy that Botswana added to its record of upholding human rights provision for each and every citizen,” Kolanyane-Kesupile said.

gay sex
Pride Month kicked off on June 1 and honours the LGBTQ community while commemorating New York’s Stonewall riots in June 1969. Pixabay

“It is not only a victory for LGBT people. We are here to say every single member deserves to be protected unto the laws of the country.”

ALSO READ: Marvel Universe to Introduce a LGBTQ Superhero Very Soon

Homosexuality is a crime in the majority of African nations, and discrimination is common. Botswana joins Angola, Mozambique, and the Seychelles in removing anti-gay laws and is the first to do so through the court system. The others removed the discriminatory laws through parliament or constitutional reform.

While the Botswana high court’s ruling is widely seen as a victory for gay rights, South Africa remains the only country on the continent with explicit legal rights based on sexual orientation. (VOA)