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The company's attractiveness eroded as Apple Inc.'s iPhone.

After January 4, BlackBerry handsets running the original operating system and services will no longer be supported, signalling the end of an era for the famous device that ushered in the mobile age.

According to BlackBerry Ltd.'s end-of-life page, handsets running its in-house software "will no longer be expected to reliably function" after Tuesday. BlackBerry Ltd., formerly known as Research In Motion, whose signature handset in the 1990s came to symbolise working on the move, said handsets running its in-house software "will no longer be expected to reliably function" after Tuesday.


The decision, which was initially announced in 2020, effectively ends a line-up that is still popular in some areas of the world for its dependability and security. BlackBerry handsets, with their physical keyboards, were once the go-to mobile device for professionals checking email and younger people communicating on the company's proprietary platform.

During the previous decade, the company's attractiveness eroded as Apple Inc.'s iPhone and a wave of Android devices with larger displays, sharper graphics, and more app options took over the market.

In 2016, the Canadian firm transitioned to a software-only business, licencing its name and services to TCL Communication Technology Holdings Ltd., who continued to release smartphones until the arrangement expired in 2020.

TCL devices ran on Alphabet Inc.'s Android operating system and will be supported until August.

However, nostalgia for the BlackBerry moniker made it one of the meme stocks of 2021, causing a big increase in its share price in January before an equally dramatic drop.

These devices will be unable to get over-the-air provisioning updates,These devices will be unable to get over-the-air provisioning updates,

Blackberry handset These devices will be unable to get over-the-air provisioning updates.Pocket lint/wikipedia

TCL devices ran on Alphabet Inc.'s Android operating system and will be supported until August.

However, nostalgia for the BlackBerry moniker made it one of the meme stocks of 2021, causing a big increase in its share price in January before an equally dramatic drop.

"These devices will be unable to get over-the-air provisioning updates, and as a result, this functionality, including data, phone calls, SMS, and 9-1-1 capability, will no longer be anticipated to work consistently," the firm warned. "Applications will be limited in functionality as well." –Bloomberg

As reported by the New York Times, on Monday, Adam Matlock, 37, who runs TechOdyssey, a YouTube technology review channel, said he received a lot of comments from BlackBerry users who were concerned about not being able to use their smartphones.

He explained, "They've been hanging on to it for so long because there's no successor." "I've always thought BlackBerries were unique since they featured a keyboard and weren't attempting to be another touch screen phone."

Also read: BlackBerry Unveils its EoT Platform ‘BlackBerry Spark’

As per the conversation of Times of India with Kevin Michaluk, the creator of CrackBerry, a website and forum dedicated to the once-popular gadgets, waxed nostalgic over the technology's growth and collapse. In 2016, BlackBerry stopped producing phones, which had been synonymous with the firm, which was previously known as Research in Motion.

"I've gone through the initial grief multiple times," Michaluk, who goes by the moniker CrackBerry Kevin, said. "People have no idea who the hell I am if I use my true name." BlackBerry customers will no longer be able to receive or send text messages or other data, make phone calls, or contact 911 if they are using legacy services on cellular networks or WiFi, according to a warning posted on the company's website on December 22.

(keywords: Black berry, No support, Old Devices, January 4)


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