Tuesday April 7, 2020
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Blame Game Continues: Donald Trump denies Russia’s possible hacking into the US political system

U.S government actively encourages organizations to have good anti-virus protections due to Russia's possible hacking into the system

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Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump told an interviewer on a Russian TV network that he doubts Russia was involved. Wikimedia
  • FBI told Arizona election officials that Russians had hacked into their system
  • Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump told an interviewer on a Russian TV network that he doubts Russia was involved
  • Russian President Vladimir Putin denies any connection to the cyberattacks

The controversy still rages over Russia’s possible hacking into computer systems used by American political entities. Defence Secretary Ash Carter has warned Russia not to try to interfere with the U.S general election in November. Yet Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump says he doubts that Russia is involved.

The election — the heart of U.S democracy — is at the center of the debate. But before we tell you how … a little background.

The system is decentralized. Votes are collected where people live, and then each state sets up its own security, in its own electoral system, to tabulate its votes. This method is intended to reduce fraud.

So imagine the shock when the FBI told Arizona election officials that Russians had hacked into their system. Experts also blame Russia for hacking into Democratic party emails.

A former U.S ambassador to Georgia and Kazakhstan, William Courtney, writes that Russia will be seen as a “rogue elephant” if it continues its disruptions.

“Great powers have to work with each other to accomplish objectives. So the United States and China are working together on the global warming issue. A great power can’t exist in isolation,” said Courtney.

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump told an interviewer on a Russian TV network that he doubts Russia was involved, and Russian President Vladimir Putin denies any connection to the cyberattacks.

Democratic Senator Ben Cardin believes any attacks would have to have been approved by key leaders.

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“You have to believe that at the highest levels, that these strategies have been agreed to,” said Cardin.

The worry now for Republican Senator Bob Corker is of any Russian tampering in the general election, which will choose the next U.S president.

“If they can demonstrate that … maybe they affected it, obviously that creates distrust in the outcome, [and] instability, so that’s a big win for them,” said Corker.

Remember the separate state electoral systems? Courtney suggests the Department of Homeland Security should protect election systems as part of the nation’s “critical infrastructures.”

“That would mean that the U.S government will be actively involved to encourage those organizations that have good cyber hygiene, to have good anti-virus protections and other things,” said Courtney.

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But that may be too late to do that for the presidential election, now less than 60 days away. (VOA)

  • Ayushi Gaur

    Trump has virtually lost the elections from Clinton

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Video Meeting App Zoom Prone to Hacking: Report

Zoom bug can let hackers steal your Windows password

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The video conferencing app Zoom has an unpatched bug can let hackers steal users Windows password. (Representational Image). Pixabay

Slammed for the lack of users privacy and security by the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and cybersecurity experts, video meeting app Zoom is also prone to hacking, a new report has claimed, saying an unpatched bug can let hackers steal users Windows password.

The �Zoom client for Windows’ is vulnerable to the ‘UNC path injection’ vulnerability that could let remote attackers steal login credentials for victims’ Windows systems, reports TheHacckeNews.

The latest finding by cybersecurity expert @_g0dmode, has also been “confirmed by researcher Matthew Hickey and Mohamed A. Baset,’ the report said late Wednesday.

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The attack involves the “SMBRelay technique” wherein Windows automatically exposes a user’s login username and NTLM password hashes to a remote server, when attempting to connect and download a file hosted on it.

“The attack is possible only because Zoom for Windows supports remote UNC paths, which converts such potentially insecure URLs into hyperlinks for recipients in a personal or group chat,” the report claimed. Besides Windows credentials, the vulnerability can also be exploited to launch any programme present on a targeted computer.

zoom hacking
The Zoom client for Windows’ is vulnerable to the ‘UNC path injection’ vulnerability that could let remote attackers steal login credentials for victims’ Windows systems, reports TheHacckeNews. Pixabay

Zoom has been notified of this bug but the flaw is yet to be fixed. “Users are advised to either use an alternative video conferencing software or Zoom in your web browser instead of the dedicated client app,” said the report. Another media report claimed that Zoom doesn’t use end-to-end encryption to protect calling data of its users.

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As businesses, schools and colleges and millions of SMBs use video conferencing tool Zoom during the work-from-home scenario, the US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has warned people about porn material being popped up during the video meetings.

Also Read- Facebook Announces To Expand Community Help Feature

The Boston branch of the law enforcement agency said it has received multiple reports of Zoom conferences being disrupted by pornographic and/or hate images and threatening language.

The video conferencing app late last month updated its iOS app to remove the software development kit (SDK) that was providing users’ data to Facebook through the Login with Facebook feature. (IANS)