Sunday May 27, 2018
Home Politics While being r...

While being raped, she shouldn’t have fought back: Nirbhaya’s rapist

0
//
80
Republish
Reprint

By Harshmeet Singh

It is time for girls to take another lesson. This time, from a person convicted of carrying out one of the most brutal gang rapes reported in Indian history.

Mukesh Singh, the driver of the fateful bus inside which 23 year old physiotherapy student Nirbhaya was gang raped and assaulted in Delhi on 16th December, 2012, said in an interview to BBC that women who go out at night have only themselves to blame in case they attract the attention of male molesters. According to English website www.independent.co.uk, the convict said that “while being raped, she shouldn’t have fought back. She should have just remained silent and allowed the rape.”

The interview was taken by Leslee Udwin, a British filmmaker working for BBC. The interview is a part of a documentary which is scheduled to be aired on BBC on 8thMarch 2015, the International Women’s Day.

nirbhaya case

The Nirbhaya gang rape case saw an unprecedented response from the society, with millions of people belonging to different age groups, taking to streets and demanding death penalty for all the offenders, including a juvenile. The aftermath of the incident saw two major steps being taken by the government.

Firstly, Justice Verma committee was formed to come up with necessary amendments in the criminal law to allow sterner punishment in the sexual assault cases. 29 days and 80,000 suggestions later, the committee submitted its report to the government. While the committee favoured the broadening of definition of sexual offences, it rejected the popular demand of decreasing the juvenile age to 16 from 18.

Secondly, the creation of a Rs 1,000 crore Nirbhaya Fund to provide financial assistance to the NGOs working in areas of women security. In his Budget speech, Finance Minister Arun Jaitley announced an additional corpus of Rs 1,000 crore to the fund. However, neither the previous government nor the current one has put forward any concrete plans for the usage of these funds.

The parents of the girl have shown exemplary courage by coming out in the open and fighting for justice for their beloved daughter. And now it is up to the society and the authorities to ensure that their agony isn’t stretched too far.

Read more here: Hypocrisy in society

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2015 NewsGram

Next Story

BBC’s “Bollywood’s Dark Secret” speaks nothing

Anchor Rajini Vaidyanathan asks no hard-hitting questions. There is no answer to the crucial question: "why have Bollywood's casting-couch victims not come out with their experiences?"

0
//
27
Apart from Radhika Apte holding forth in a British accent and Usha Jadhav speaking of her harrowing experience in a Marathi accent, the BBC's much-discussed documentary
BBC representational Image, wikimedia commons

Apart from Radhika Apte holding forth in a British accent and Usha Jadhav speaking of her harrowing experience in a Marathi accent, the BBC’s much-discussed documentary “Bollywood’s Dark Secret” says nothing that we haven’t already heard or seen.

Anchor Rajini Vaidyanathan asks no hard-hitting questions. There is no answer to the crucial question: “why have Bollywood’s casting-couch victims not come out with their experiences?”

Radhika Apte talks about men in Bollywood being as powerful as “Gods” whom no one would dare point a finger at. She isn’t doing it either. She has no personal story of exploitation to share.

Radhika Apte talks about men in Bollywood being as powerful as "Gods" whom no one would dare point a finger at. She isn't doing it either. She has no personal story of exploitation to share.
Radhika Apte, wikimedia commons

It’s all about others. Luckily for us, Usha Jadhav is not afraid to speak her mind. She speaks unabashedly about the man who abused her physically, touched her anywhere and everywhere, put his hand in her clothes.

But who was this man? I even asked Usha why she doesn’t want to name him.

“Because it wouldn’t be right,” she told me.

Right for whom?

Is this really what Bollywood has come to mean in the global arena’s “MeToo” campaign? Two actresses, one of whom is clearly talking about an out-of-body experience (all rhetorics and hypothesis suggesting she has never been through the casting couch), the other putting words to an experience that is too painful on recall and sounds more like a confession at a distress meeting in a sex clinic.

Beyond the truth about the symbiotic sexuality ingrained in Bollywood’s demand-and-supply mindset, there is the truth about the potential victim allowing herself to be exploited of her own free will.

Also Read: Rakhi Sawant Speaks up About Casting Couch

How free is that will which compels a girl to get on the casting couch voluntarily? The BBC documentary is not able to extricate Bollywood’s ‘Dark Secret’ from the clutches of cliches. It needed more muscle and heft to be persuasive. All we get is a couple of opinions swathed in vague rhetorics. No naming no shaming.

After watching the BBC’s sketchy account of the casting couch in Bollywood, I am more than ever convinced that the “MeToo” movement is far removed from our perception. The predators won’t stop, because there is no concerted will to stop them. (BollywoodCountry)

 

Next Story