Monday January 20, 2020

Blood Pressure-Lowering Effect of Exercise Significantly Reduces When People Rinse their Mouths with Mouthwash

For the study, published in the journal Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 23 healthy adults were asked to run on a treadmill

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Mouthwash, Blood Pressure, Exercise
Scientists already know that blood vessels open up during exercise, as the production of nitric oxide increases the diameter of the blood vessels (known as vasodilation), increasing blood flow circulation to active muscles. Pixabay

Researchers have found that the blood pressure-lowering effect of exercise is significantly reduced when people rinse their mouths with antibacterial mouthwash, rather than water – showing the importance of oral bacteria in cardiovascular health.

“Scientists already know that blood vessels open up during exercise, as the production of nitric oxide increases the diameter of the blood vessels (known as vasodilation), increasing blood flow circulation to active muscles,” said study lead author Raul Bescos, Professor at the University of Plymouth.

For the study, published in the journal Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 23 healthy adults were asked to run on a treadmill for a total of 30 minutes on two separate occasions, after which they were monitored for two hours.

On each occasion at one, 30, 60 and 90 minutes after exercise they were asked to rinse their mouths with a liquid – either antibacterial mouthwash (0.2 per cent chlorhexidine) or a placebo of mint-flavoured water.

Mouthwash, Blood Pressure, Exercise
Researchers have found that the blood pressure-lowering effect of exercise is significantly reduced when people rinse their mouths with antibacterial mouthwash, rather than water – showing the importance of oral bacteria in cardiovascular health. Pixabay

Their blood pressure was measured and saliva and blood samples were taken before exercise and at 120 minutes after exercise.

The study found that when participants rinsed with the placebo, the average reduction in systolic blood pressure was -5.2 mmHg at one hour after exercise.

However when participants rinsed with the antibacterial mouthwash, the average systolic blood pressure was -2.0 mmHg at the same time point.

Systolic blood pressure refers to the highest blood pressure level when the heart is squeezing and pushing the blood round the body.

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The results show that the blood pressure-lowering effect of exercise was diminished by more than 60 per cent over the first hour of recovery and totally abolished two hours after exercise when participants were given the antibacterial mouthwash.

“These findings show that nitrite synthesis by oral bacteria is hugely important in kick-starting how our bodies react to exercise over the first period of recovery, promoting lower blood pressure and greater muscle oxygenation,” said study co-author Craig Cutler from the University of Plymouth.

“In effect, it’s like oral bacteria are the ‘key’ to opening up the blood vessels. If they are removed, nitrite can’t be produced and the vessels remain in their current state,” Cutler said.

“Existing studies show that, exercise aside, antibacterial mouthwash can actually raise blood pressure under resting conditions, so this study followed up and showed the mouthwash impact on the effects of exercise,” Cutler added. (IANS)

Next Story

Lazy Infants More Likely to Suffer From Obesity

Less active babies have higher obesity risk

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Infant obesity
Less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life. Pixabay

Parents, please take note. Researchers have revealed that less active infants may accumulate more fat, which in turn may put them at risk for obesity later in life.

For the study, published in the journal Obesity, researchers tracked the physical activity levels of 506 infants using small ankle-worn accelerometers for four days per tracking period at ages 3, 6, 9, and 12 months.

For each tracking period after 3, average physical activity increased by about four per cent, in line with infants becoming generally more mobile and active over the course of their first year.

Among infants, higher physical activity measured by the accelerometer was associated with lower central adiposity, a measure of lower-torso fat accumulation, the study said.

Infant obesity
These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers and it may lead to obesity. Pixabay

“This is the first study to demonstrate an association over time between higher levels of objectively measured physical activity and lower central adiposity in infancy,” said study lead author Sara Benjamin-Neelon from Johns Hopkins University in US.

The study was part of a larger study of infant growth and obesity, called the Nurture study, which covered 666 mothers and their infants from the greater Durham, North Carolina, area during 2013 to 2016.

Of this group, the research team were able to get adequate accelerometer data for 506 infants.

“Some evidence suggests that the earlier you can get infants crawling and walking, and providing them with opportunities to move freely throughout the day, the more you can help protect them against later obesity,” Benjamin-Neelon said.

The study found that among the infants in the study, an increase in recorded activity by one “standard deviation”–essentially a standard proportion of the range of the data–was associated with a small but significant decrease in central adiposity.

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The researcher noted that larger, longer-term studies will be necessary to determine the sustained effect of infant physical activity, but that preventing extended periods of inactivity for infants will almost certainly be good for them.

“These days, infants are spending more and more sedentary time in car seats, high chairs, strollers–and perhaps we haven’t thought enough about the developmental ramifications of these types of restrictive devices,” Benjamin-Neelon concluded. (IANS)