Tuesday February 19, 2019
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Bobby Jindal equates Donald Trump to Kardashians

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Washington: Long shot Indian-American Republican presidential candidate Bobby Jindal declined to back Donald Trump if he wins the party nomination, calling him an “egomaniacal madman” and equating him with Kim Kardashian, only to be snubbed by the party frontrunner.

photo credit: greenrushinvestors.com
photo credit: greenrushinvestors.com

In a string of attacks on Thursday, some of the epithets used by Jindal for Trump included “a non-serious carnival act”, “entertaining narcissist,” “full of foolishness and nonsense,” a “power-hungry shark” who “eats whatever is in front of him”.

Asking the real estate mogul to return to reality TV after a summer fling with politics, the Louisiana governor, who is languishing at the bottom of polls, said: “The Donald Trump act is great, and the idea of Donald Trump is great. But the reality of Donald Trump is absurd.”

In hard hitting attacks Jindal went on to say it is “silly to argue policy” with Trump because “he has no idea what he’s talking about, he makes it all up on the fly” and “lacks the intellectual curiosity to even learn.”

“Just because people like watching Kim Kardashian, we wouldn’t put her in the White House either,” Jindal quipped. “His diagnosis is right, his prescription is false. He is not the solution,” he said.

Later appearing on CNN, Jindal vowed, “We’re not going to let him win the nomination. He can not be the nominee. He can not be our next president.”

Asked if he would support Trump if he emerges as the Republican nominee as all party presidential contenders, including Trump, have pledged, Jindal declined to answer the “hypothetical” saying they were working to prevent that. Jindal continued to attack Trump on Twitter several times Thursday afternoon, tweeting out a video mocking Trump and telling the candidate to “Stay classy.”

Trump struck back mocking Jindal’s standing in the polls. “He did not make the debate stage and therefore I have never met him,” Trump said.

“I only respond to people that register more than 1 percent in the polls. I never thought he had a chance and I’ve been proven right.”

Jindal has repeatedly attacked Trump in what analysts see as a desperate plea to grab media attention and bolster his standing in the polls.
(With inputs from IANS)

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White House in Support of Trump’s National Emergency Declaration

Trump said he declared the national emergency because he was unhappy with the amount of money Congress authorized.

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US, Donald Trump, Emergency, White house
President Donald Trump speaks at the White House in Washington, to declare a national emergency in order to build a wall along the southern border, Feb. 15, 2019. VOA

The White House is defending President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency at the U.S.-Mexico border as multiple states prepare to file legal challenges and Democrats in Congress plan to vote their disapproval.

“He could choose to ignore this crisis, but he chose not to,” Trump adviser Stephen Miller, an immigration hardliner, told Fox News Sunday.

Miller assailed former Republican President George W. Bush for what he called an “astonishing betrayal” of the U.S. nearly two decades ago when four times as many immigrants were illegally entering the United States as now. But Miller said the “bottom line” is that “you cannot conceive of a strong nation without a secure border.”

He said Trump’s action is “defending our own borders.” He illegal immigration “is a threat in our country.”

Miller said Trump’s actions were justified under a 1976 law giving presidents authority to declare national emergencies, although none of the 59 declared since then has involved instances when a president has attempted to override congressional refusal to approve funding for a specific proposal.

Trump declared the national emergency on Friday to circumvent Congress, which had refused his request for $5.7 billion in wall funding, even as it approved $1.375 billion for barriers along about 90 kilometers of the 3,200-kilometer border. Trump plans to tap more than $8 billion in government funds authorized for other projects the build the wall, although lawsuits challenging the action are already being filed to block his transfer of money.

US, Donald Trump, National Emergency, White house
Border Patrol agent Vincent Pirro looks on near a border wall that separates the cities of Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego, Feb. 5, 2019, in San Diego. VOA

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra told ABC’s This Week that his state and others would “definitely and imminently” file a legal challenge, arguing that people all over the United States would be harmed by Trump’s move because the diverted money would not be spent on needed services.

“Typically our presidents have focused on issues where the national interests are clearly at stake,” Becerra said about previous national emergency declarations. “The national interests are not at stake here. We have the lowest level of entries into the country by those who don’t have permission than we’ve had in some 20 years.”

Acting U.S. Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said he thinks he has “a lot of discretion” in deciding which funds previously allocated for defense needs can instead be used to build a border wall. “You can trust the numbers in terms of the potential. Then you gotta marry it up with where the money would be spent.” But he said money designated for military housing would not be spent on the wall.

Trump said he declared the national emergency because he was unhappy with the amount of money Congress authorized.

“I want to do it faster,” he said. “I could do the wall over a longer period of time. I didn’t need to do this. But I’d rather do it much faster.”

Trump’s staunchest critics, including Democrats who have announced they are running against him next year and other lawmakers, have attacked his national emergency declaration as an end-run around the constitutional provision that U.S. funding authorization lies with Congress and noted that he said that he did not need to take action.

US, Donald Trump, National Emergency, White House
Trump declared the national emergency on Friday to circumvent Congress, which had refused his request for $5.7 billion in wall funding. VOA

Democratic Congressman Adam Schiff, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, told CNN, “If we give away, if we surrender the power of the purse… there will be little check and no balance left. It’ll not be a separation of powers anymore, just a separation of parties.”

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Journalist Bob Woodward, who chronicled the first year of the Trump presidency in a best-selling book called “Fear,” told Fox News he believes Trump made the national emergency declaration because “he looks strong. He looks tough to lots of people.”

Trump centered much of his successful 2016 campaign for the White House on a vow to build the wall and make Mexico pay for it. He long since abandoned direct payment from Mexico, when its leaders rejected the idea, and instead sought congressional approval of the U.S. taxpayer funding. (VOA)