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Boeing’s New Space Capsule for Astronauts Faces More Launch Delays

The Starliner will fly on United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket, the same kind of rocket needed for the Air Force's critical mission in late June, from the same pad

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FILE - One of Boeing Co's CST-100 Starliner astronaut capsules is seen at a production facility in Cape Canaveral, Florida, Jan. 15, 2019. VOA

The Starliner capsule was supposed to make its debut this month, after a series of postponements. But the first test flight is now off until August. And the second test flight, with astronauts, won’t occur until late in the year.

NASA announced the revised lineup Wednesday. At the same time, officials said the first Starliner crew will remain at the International Space Station longer than the few weeks originally anticipated. The mission length will be decided later.

SpaceX, NASA’s other commercial crew provider, successfully flew its new Dragon capsule without a crew to the International Space Station last month. The first flight with astronauts could be as early as this summer, but the schedule is under review.

Boeing said the last major milestones have been cleared and the capsule is almost finished. But scheduling conflicts with an early summer Air Force launch helped push the Starliner’s debut into August.
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FILE – The SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule approaches the International Space Station, March 3, 2019. VOA

The Starliner will fly on United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V rocket, the same kind of rocket needed for the Air Force’s critical mission in late June, from the same pad.

While the first SpaceX astronauts will visit the space station for a few weeks at most, the Starliner’s three-person crew will move into the orbiting complex for an extended period. The typical station stay is about six months.

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NASA wants to reduce its reliance on expensive Russian Soyuz capsules as soon as possible, and so the Boeing test flight will double as a taxi mission for station residents. NASA astronauts have been riding Russian rockets since the end of the space shuttle program.

SpaceX Dragons and Boeing Starliners will return human launches to Florida, following the eight-year hiatus. NASA contracted with the two companies to handle space station ferry flights, so it could focus on getting astronauts to the moon and, eventually, Mars. (VOA)

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Boeing Makes Demand for 2,380 Aircraft In India

An expected demand of 2,380 new airplanes is being made by Boeing by 2038

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Demand for aircrafts
Boeing expects a demand for 2,380 new aircraft in India, valued at $330 billion by 2038. Pixabay

Global aerospace major Boeing expects a demand for 2,380 new aircraft in India, valued at $330 billion, over the next 20 years.

According to the Boeing’s annual India Commercial Market Outlook (CMO) 2019, factors such as exponential domestic passenger traffic growth, new long-haul opportunities and infrastructure development will lead to the fulfilment of the demand forecast.

“To operate and maintain the expanding fleet, operators are expected to spend $440 billion on aviation services, including ground, station and cargo operations, along with maintenance and engineering,” the 2019 India CMO said.

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To operate and maintain the expanding fleet, operators are expected to spend $440 billion on aviation services including maintenance of aircraft. Pixabay

“In India, single-aisles will lead the demand for airplane deliveries — comprising 87 per cent of all new airplanes — to meet requirements for domestic network connections and service to new airports.

“Wide-body airplanes will make up 13 per cent of new airplane deliveries, helping to enable new long-range flights.”

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As per the CMO, many of the new airplanes will replace aging aircraft and help operators grow their network as India’s airplane fleet is projected to quadruple in size to approximately 2,500 aircraft by 2038. (IANS)