Thursday February 21, 2019
Home Entertainment Bollywood act...

Bollywood actress Soha Ali Khan is all set to publish Stories on her life of being ‘moderately famous’

Titled "The Perils of Being Moderately Famous", the book has been acquired by Penguin India

0
//
Soha Ali Khan and Sharmila Tagore, Wikimedia

India, Jan 30, 2017: Bollywood actress Soha Ali Khan is all set to publish a collection of humorous, and sometimes bizarre, stories on her life as a royal princess and a “moderately famous” celebrity, in what is going to be her debut in writing.

Titled “The Perils of Being Moderately Famous”, the book has been acquired by Penguin India and will be released later the year.

Soha is the youngest daughter of actor Sharmila Tagore and Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi, the ninth Nawab of Pataudi (1952-71).

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Her official title is Nawabzadi Soha Ali Khan of Pataudi and Bhopal.

Soha has appeared in movies like “Rang De Basanti” and “Tum Mile”. She studied modern history at Balliol College, Oxford, and earned a Master’s degree in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Soha said that she is a voracious reader and was utilising her leisure hours to write.

“I can use this time creatively to pen down memories, some insights from what surely must be a life less ordinary. I am a princess after all. Try not to imagine me saying that whilst stamping my feet in a silver sequined dress with a tiara on my head. And as a person of royalty, surely I am entitled to some royalties,” Soha said.

The actress, however, warned the readers that “if you are hoping I will reveal the secret behind Kareena (Kapoor-Khan) glowing complexion or how ‘bhai’ (her brother Saif Ali Khan) trains for an action film, then I am afraid you are barking up the wrong book.”

The bulk of the book, Soha said, was about her and her life.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

“Having read a few chapters, I can safely say Soha was born to write. She has amassed a huge fan following not only for her movies but also for her witty repartee on Twitter, and her charm and wit continue to shine in this brilliant collection of personal essays where she recounts with self-deprecating humour some of the most poignant moments of her life — from growing up as a modern-day princess to life as a celebrity in the times of social media culture,” said Commissioning Editor Gurveen Chadha. (IANS)

Next Story

HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

0
cancer
Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

cancer
Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

Also Read: Indian IT Act Silent On Social Media’s Manipulative Role
“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)