Monday May 27, 2019

Bollywood is a purely money-driven industry : Indian Ocean’s Rahul Ram

0
//

New Delhi: The musical landscape of the Hindi film industry is constantly evolving and Rahul Ram, vocalist and bassist of long-running folk rock band Indian Ocean, believes “Bollywood has changed” and it’s a “purely money-driven industry”. tumblr_static_bollywood-logo

“I think the music evolves on its own. If something works, people would want to go in that direction. Bollywood has changed. It’s a purely money-driven industry,” Ram told IANS in a telephonic interview.

The musician, who has composed three songs for Neeraj Ghaywan’s directorial debut, the Cannes- acclaimed “Masaan”, with his band Indian Ocean, says if the music of the film gets appreciated, “then more people would want to follow that”.

Asked about the evolution of indie music in India, the musician said that every Indian indie band needs a chance to exhibit their talent.

He isn’t, however, too keen on using the term ‘indie music’ for independent artists in India, and says that it’s important to coin a new nomenclature altogether.

“We have to come with our own nomenclature. Non-Bollywood, non-traditional is a better term than indie. We are searching for a term for Indian Ocean for the last 25 years. We call Indian Ocean as ‘frock’ – folk rock,” he quipped.

Indian Ocean have “adequate material” for a new full-length and have worked on two new songs with legendary ghatam player Pandit Vikku Vinayakram and saxophonist George Brooks, says Ram.

“We have another new song ready, which we will perform in Bangalore on July 31. We are doing a set called ‘Side A, Side B’. It will be a four-hour concert, including a track from ‘Masaan’,” he said

For “Masaan”, the story of which revolves around four lives which intersect along the Ganga river, Indian Ocean created heart-warming music that duly fits in with the film’s aesthetics.

“Basically, after initial talks with Neeraj, we figured that there will be one love track in the film, which was ‘Tu kisi rail si guzarti hai’. To get the actual tune took us a long time. We went through four-five variations for it.

“The second song ‘Mann kasturi’ was approved of within an hour. I hadn’t even seen the lyrics. Neeraj and Varun Grover (writer) were coming from Mumbai to listen to the music. They heard the tune and loved it. It was fixed there and then,” Ram said about the musical compositions of “Masaan”.

The third song titled “Bhor” is however an old Indian Ocean song from their album “Jhini”, which was rendered in a different version for the film, says Ram.

“The third song was a version of our song which we released in 2003. It’s called ‘Bhor’. In the final edit, Neeraj had taken the original version of the song, which is way faster. But I told him that it’s not working out. I am talking about a completely different mood, so I had to persuade him to use a new version,” he added.

Talking about the recording process of this song, Ram said it was recorded in a “different” way from how music is recorded in studios nowadays.

“The way we recorded it is also different. Four of us stood in four different parts of the studio and played with the song. Nikhil was on guitars, Amit with flute and all three of us had vocals and we sang. And when we felt we have a version that was adequate, we thought that we should go and repair it,” he said.

“Around 50 years back, there were just two tracks, so the whole orchestra used to play together. Even the old jazz records were recorded in that manner. The feel of interacting with each other is there in those live recordings, but now that feel is gone,” he added.

(IANS)

Next Story

British-led Nekton Scientific Mission in Indian Ocean Reaches an End

The oceans' role in regulating climate and the threats they face from global warming are underestimated by many. Scientific missions are crucial in taking stock of underwater ecosystems' health

0
indian ocean
A manta ray swims near the submersible during a dive off the coast of the island of St. Joseph in the Seychelles, April 8, 2019. VOA

The British-led Nekton scientific mission on Thursday completed a seven-week expedition in the Indian Ocean aimed at documenting changes beneath the waves that could affect billions of people in the surrounding region over the coming decades.

Little is known about the watery world below depths of 30 meters (yards), the limit to which a normal scuba diver can go. Operating down to 450 meters with manned submersibles and underwater drones off the island nation of the Seychelles, the scientists were the first to explore areas of great diversity where sunlight weakens and the deep ocean begins.

The oceans’ role in regulating climate and the threats they face from global warming are underestimated by many. Scientific missions are crucial in taking stock of underwater ecosystems’ health.

Principal scientist Lucy Woodall called the mission “massively successful,” saying that members believe they have found evidence near several coral islands of a so-called rariphotic zone, or “twilight zone,” located between 130 and 300 meters deep.

indian ocean
Seychelles President Danny Faure, left, sits inside a submersible on the deck of vessel Ocean Zephyr, off the coast of Desroches, in the outer islands of Seychelles, April 13, 2019. VOA

“The rariphotic zone has been shown in a number of papers in the Atlantic and Caribbean but has never previously been shown in the Indian Ocean,” Woodall said, adding that months of analysis will be needed to confirm the discovery.

In this twilight zone that sunlight barely reaches, photosynthesis is no longer possible and species that cannot move toward the ocean’s surface rely on particles falling from above for sustenance. Woodall also said she was excited to see “vibrant” communities of fish during the mission.

“We’re seeing schools of small fish – that middle of the food chain – but we’re also seeing a large number of big predators – the sharks and all the other fish predators as well that are there. So this shows that protection works,” she said.

With the expedition over, the long work of analysis begins. Researchers conducted over 300 deployments, collected around 1,300 samples and 20 terabytes of data and surveyed about 30 square kilometers (11.5 sq. miles) of seabed using high-resolution multi-beam sonar equipment.

Woodall estimated her team will need up to 18 months of lab work to process and make sense of the data gathered during the expedition. The data will be used to help the Seychelles expand its policy of protecting almost a third of its national waters by 2020. The initiative is important for the country’s “blue economy,” an attempt to balance development needs with those of the environment.

On Sunday, President Danny Faure visited the Nekton team and delivered a striking speech broadcast live from deep below the ocean’s surface, making a global plea for stronger protection of the “beating blue heart of our planet.”

indian ocean
Little is known about the watery world below depths of 30 meters (yards), the limit to which a normal scuba diver can go. VOA

For Nekton mission director Oliver Steeds, Faure’s visit was a win for the ocean.

“I hope our ability to broadcast live from the ocean has helped put the oceans back on the map in the boardrooms, the corridors of power and in the classrooms,” Steeds said. “That’s where the decisions need to be made to fundamentally secure our future and the improved management and conservation of our ocean.”

He said mission members hope that nations across the Indian Ocean will have the political will to improve the management and conservation of their waters.

ALSO READ: Reason Revealed Behind the Crash of Israeli Spacecraft

“It’s been an extraordinary aquatic adventure,” Steeds said. “We’re delighted that so many people around the world have been following our progress but it only really matters if the Seychelles can continue to take a lead on the world stage as a beacon of hope for ocean conservation.”

This is the first of a half-dozen regions the mission plans to explore before the end of 2022, when scientists will present their research at a summit on the state of the Indian Ocean. (VOA)