Tuesday March 26, 2019
Home India Books based o...

Books based on Indo-Caribbean life

0
//

We profile here some of the books that cover the Indo-Caribbean life. In British times, a lot of Indians migrated to the Caribbean islands and they have created a life there which is its own uniqueness with the blend Indian legacy. The books are available on amazon.com

  1. Jahaji: An Anthology of Indo-Caribbean Fiction

Indians have lived in the Caribbean for more than a hundred and sixty years, ever since they took to the ships to work on the sugar plantations. Jahaji (the term meaning “ship-traveler”) brings together a representative selection of Indo-Caribbean fiction from three generations of writers from Ismith Khan through Rooplall Monar and Cyril Dabydeen to Marian Budhos and Shani Mootoo. Together, the sixteen writers included here give us an imaginative depiction of the experiences of their people across a span of fifty years – the hopes, aspirations and frustrations of life in colonial Trinidad and Guyana, the post-independence tribulations of third-world citizens and the quest for meaning and identity in the second migration to Canada, the United States and Britain.

2.Indo-Caribbean Indenture: Resistance and Accommodation, 1838-1920

“Indo-Caribbean Indenture” investigates the relatively little-studied but growing field of the experiences of East Indians in the Caribbean from their arrival in 1838 to the end of indentureship in 1920. It places the indenture period into a larger socio-economic framework of imperialism, the post-slavery attempt to solve the labour shortage and the gender-relations which overarched the whole transaction in human bodies. By utilizing a new analytical perspective offered by current writers on the subject of the subaltern, the work departs from the usual historical approach and offers a fresh interpretation. The work will be of particular interest to historians, sociologists and social scientists who focus on the Caribbean, migration, ethnicity, gender studies, peasant resistance, labour history and cultural continuity and change.

 

3Bindi: The Multifaceted Lives of Indo-Caribbean Women

In contemporary times, the bindi (red dot between the eyebrows) is decorative as well as religious and is worn by women of any marital status, Hindu or non-Hindu, in India, its diaspora and globally. Rosanne Kanhai uses the bindi to characterize how Into-Caribbean women come into their own in multiple ways. The book is a sequel to Matikor: The Politics of Identity for Indo-Caribbean Women and showcases recent works that reflect a variety of disciplines, styles and topics that include considering Indo-Caribbean women in creative, artistic and performance text, historical and anthropological analyses, intersection with their “others” in the Caribbean and its diaspora, narratives of self, healing and spiritual growth, and roles in religion and cultural activities.

Next Story

Indians Seek Ride-hailing Mostly For Mid-distance Travel

The results showed that southern region has the highest awareness of ride-hailing services, followed by middle, western and north India. Eastern region has the lowest awareness of ride-hailing services

0
Ola Cabs
Take a look at the Top 5 Ride Hailing Apps in India. Pixabay

Indians seek ride-hailing services mostly for mid-distance travel – 10-20-km – according to a new survey by Counterpoint Research which showed that two out of three ride-sharing users avail the service at least once a week.

Over 66 per cent users of shared mobility services consider ride-hailing more economical than owning a car, showed the findings of the survey involving over 800 consumers across tier-1, tier-2, and tier-3 cities in India.

Personal vehicles are considered more convenient and cost-effective for shorter distances.

For longer distances, people surveyed indicated their preference to use either their own vehicle or public transport, on account of the higher costs currently associated with ride-hailing services.

cabs
Woman hiring taxi. Pixabay

“10-20 kms per trip is the ‘sweet spot’ travel distance most favoured for considering ride-hailing options,” Aman Madhok, Senior Analyst at Counterpoint Research, said in a statement.

The results showed that southern region has the highest awareness of ride-hailing services, followed by middle, western and north India. Eastern region has the lowest awareness of ride-hailing services, according to the report.

Also Read- Threat of AI Displacing Jobs is Real, Says Telecom Secretary

“The relatively lower penetration of shared mobility in tier-2 cities presents a significant opportunity for shared mobility providers to now expand into these towns and cities,” said Vinay Piparsania, Research Director Smart Automotive at Counterpoint Research.

“Evidently, challenges of rapid urbanisation, traffic congestion, and affordability are the primary driving forces behind digital savvy Indians re-imagining their mobility requirements,” Piparsania added. (IANS)