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Here’s How to Boost up Businesses in Times of Evolving Tech

The lab will develop science-backed hiring apps and tools that can measure diverse traits and abilities

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Team, Scrum Methodology
The performance-conducive transparency and actual visibility of the team ensure great team performances. Pixabay

Focusing on the science behind what makes some start-ups thrive and others fail, Australian researchers have unveiled a new lab that will use cutting edge neuroscience to advise how businesses can thrive in a world of constant technological change.

The “Future Minds Lab”, launched at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) Sydney this week, will include a team of 20 scientists, designers and psychologists to study the fundamental brain science and psychology behind innovation.

The team will work with industry partners to produce products and services to improve the way institutions and businesses approach different forms of innovation.

“Using fundamental research and development, our team is creating products and programmes to ensure workplaces and businesses are more resilient and better equipped to adapt to constant technological change,” Joel Pearson, Professor at the varsity, said in a statement.

“By using cutting edge neuroscience, we can discover what makes successful founders, teams and companies,” Pearson explained.

Business
Think about what you want to get from your employees. Pixabay

The lab, a 300-square metre custom built centre with virtual reality rooms, testing stations, brain stimulation devices, neuroimaging tech and research offices, will be used to develop products such as customised cognitive tests for start-ups and psychological interventions and online education programmes.

“Using technology such as gamified objective tests and mobile brain measurement, we will be able to develop tests that measure traits and abilities like creativity, resilience…” the Professor said.

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The lab will develop science-backed hiring apps and tools that can measure diverse traits and abilities. These tools will leverage the latest Machine Learning (ML) algorithms to assess job candidates’ fit for specific roles and organisations.

“Workshops will be delivered to start-up founders that aim to increase their resilience and stress management techniques, decrease burnout, and help founders enhance their mental fitness,” Pearson noted. (IANS)

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Infosys Opens Technology Centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to Accelerate Innovation for Its American Enterprises

The centre, housed at the Arizona State University (ASU), will focus on autonomous technologies, Internet of Things (IOT), full-stack engineering

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Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
Arizona Governor Doug Ducey inaugurated the centre in the presence of state officials, company executives, employees and representatives of a few enterprises. Pixabay

Global software major Infosys has opened a technology centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to accelerate innovation for its American enterprises.

“We will hire 1,000 American techies over four years to work at the centre in the southwestern state for the local enterprises,” said the city-based IT behemoth in a statement, here on Saturday.

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey inaugurated the centre in the presence of state officials, company executives, employees and representatives of a few enterprises.

The centre, housed at the Arizona State University (ASU), will focus on autonomous technologies, Internet of Things (IOT), full-stack engineering, data science and cyber security.

Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
Global software major Infosys has opened a technology centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to accelerate innovation for its American enterprises. Pixabay

“Our investment in the centre will attract local and global talent. Hiring is underway to recruit around 500 techies by 2020 and reduce the IT skills gap in the state,” it said.

Infosys Chief Executive Salil Parikh said the Arizona centre, the company’s sixth of its kind in the US since 2017, was set up to help local enterprises go for digital transformation at the earliest.

“The centre allows us to collaborate with our clients across the country in an agile manner,” said Parekh.

The centre will also leverage and empower the workforce to bridge the skill gap in the market and accelerate the digital agenda of its clients.

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“Our focus will be on harnessing, modelling and scaling a new model for workforce development in the US, where the private sector has a key role to implement it (model) or learning and on-the-job training,” said company’s president Ravi Kumar.

The centre boasts of living labs, showcasing prototypes in virtual reality, augmented reality and robotic technologies and will help foster co-creation, training and collaboration.

Lauding Infosys for foraying into the state, Ducey said its presence reinforced Arizona’s reputation as a tech hub and one of the best places to relocate and expand.

The centre will allow the company to develop cross-functional solutions to pressing business challenges in machine learning, artificial intelligence, user experience and advanced digital technologies, such as big data and cloud.

Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
“We will hire 1,000 American techies over four years to work at the centre in the southwestern state for the local enterprises,” said the city-based IT behemoth in a statement, here on Saturday. Pixabay

As part of its commitment to workforce development and bridging the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) skill gap in the US, the $11 billion outsourcing firm also announced a partnership with InStride to allow its employees complete degree programmes and education courses through ASU.

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“Infosys’ commitment to Arizona and learning speaks of the strength of talent in our community. We welcome it as a partner that will boost our competitiveness in the global economy,” said ASU president Michael Crow. (IANS)