Wednesday April 24, 2019
Home India Boy lynched i...

Boy lynched in Gurgaon over DJ request: This is not Gandhi’s India

0
//

By Sapan Kapoor

We are a country of Mahatma Gandhi who gave the message of tolerance, brotherhood and non-violence to the world that was in the grip of incessant bloody wars in the early twentieth century. Ironically, 67 years after his assassination by a ‘Hindu nationalist’, we seem to be a nation that has gone mad, drenched with violence and intolerance from tip to toe.

Today, there is violence in our words, thoughts and actions. It’s everywhere. People seem to be gunning for each other like wild beasts for their prey and taking lives over as trivial a matter like parking at a wrong place or over music in a club.

On October 20, just three days ago, 22-year-old Rohit Bhardwaj was brutally beaten to death with hockey sticks after a scuffle at a party in Gurgaon over a request for the music to be changed. His father was also severely injured when he tried to rescue him. CCTV footage of this disturbing incident being shown on news channels can make one’s hair stand on end.

Rohit, a college student in Delhi and a resident of Gurgaon, had gone to attend a friend’s birthday party in a vacant plot in the New Subhash Nagar area in Gurgaon where around 20 others had gathered.

Police said a brawl broke out when Rohit asked the DJ to change the music and the latter refused to do it. A few of the drunken partygoers then attacked Rohit, brutally beating him up with hockey sticks.

When Rohit was being attacked, his father, Deepak Bhardwaj, reached the spot and tried to save him. But the boys did not even spare him, attacking the latter with sticks. The attackers thereafter fled the spot. Rohit’s brutal, heartrending murder was caught on camera which is enough to send shivers down one’s spine.

We should be losing our sleep over this growing intolerance and violence in our society. But, alas, that does not seem to be the case. People are being bumped off for their ideas, eating habits and the way of their life. 50-year-old Mohammed Akhlaq’s only fault was that he lived in a society where mob justice was ‘acceptable’.

If Gandhiji was alive today, he would have cried his heart out after seeing the level of intolerance and violence in a country for whose freedom he sacrificed his life. How right he was when he said that ‘violence is an invitation for more violence’ and that ‘an eye for an eye will turn the whole world blind’. If we all became zombies, who will be left?

Check out this video wherein a man can be seen shooting his acquaintance in the head in broad daylight in the middle of a narrow crowded lane in West Delhi’s Vikas Nagar.

The incident took place in June this year where CCTV footage shows a man alighting from a rickshaw when another man who at first seemed to be casually passing by started an argument.

The confrontation at first seemed unprovoked, but the visual shows the man taking out a gun and later shooting at the man twice, reminiscent of a typical Bollywood shoot-out.

The man was first shot in the chest and after being hit, he tried to run away but could not succeed. The killer kept standing there, observing the victim struggling for his life. After a few seconds, he shot another bullet into the man’s head, ensuring that he did not survive the attack.

All this happened in the heart of the national capital in broad daylight and nobody came forward to rescue the wretched man.

This is where the media has also failed to perform its job i.e. to educate the people about the ramifications of increasing violence and intolerance in our society. Media’s job is not only to disseminate information but also to show the people the right path shown to us by Mahatma Gandhi. There seem to be absolutely no debates and discussions on our 24/7 news channels about the moral degradation of and growing violence in the country.

We are, alas, a nation today where two Dalit children are burnt alive by members of an upper caste community, something that should make us hang our heads in shame. Why have things come to such a pass? And where are we heading to?

In these turbulent times when ISIS asks for a Caliphate, Taliban butchers school children in Peshawar, hundreds are killed and displaced in the name of religion, we need to introspect.

The big question that needs to be asked is: Are we still humans or have we lost it somewhere in the process of evolution?

Next Story

Airstrike Escalates Fighting in Libya, Authorities Close Tripoli’s Only Functioning Airport

Russia objects to the British-drafted resolution blaming Haftar for the latest flare-up in violence when his LNA advanced to the outskirts of Tripoli earlier this month, diplomats said.

0
Libya
Libyan protesters attend a demonstration to demand an end to the Khalifa Haftar's offensive against Tripoli, in Martyrs' Square in central Tripoli, Libya, April 19, 2019. VOA

Explosions shook the Libyan capital Tripoli late Saturday after an airstrike, residents said, in an escalation of a two-week offensive by eastern forces on the city held by the internationally recognized government.

A Reuters reporter and several interviewed residents said they saw an aircraft circling for more than 10 minutes over the capital with a humming sound before opening fire on a southern suburb, scene of the heaviest fighting between the rival forces.

Reuters was unable to confirm whether an aircraft or unmanned drone was behind the strike, which triggered heavy anti-aircraft fire. Residents had reported drone strikes in the past days, but there has been no confirmation and explosions heard in the city center this time were louder than in previous days.

Residents counted several missile strikes, which apparently hit a military camp of forces loyal to Tripoli in the Sabaa district.

Members of the Libyan internationally recognized government forces fire during fighting with Eastern forces in Ain Zara, Tripoli, Libya, April 20, 2019.
Members of the Libyan internationally recognized government forces fire during fighting with Eastern forces in Ain Zara, Tripoli, Libya, April 20, 2019. VOA

Haftar stymied

The Libyan National Army (LNA) force loyal to commander Khalifa Haftar started an offensive two weeks ago but has been unable to breach the government’s southern defenses.

If a drone strike was confirmed, this would point to more sophisticated warfare. The LNA has so far mainly used aging Soviet-made jets from the air force of Moammar Gadhafi, toppled in 2011, lacking precision firepower and helicopters, according to residents and military sources.

Tripoli, Libya
Tripoli, Libya

​In the past the United Arab Emirates and Egypt have supported Haftar with airstrikes during campaigns to take eastern Libya. Both countries flew airstrikes on Tripoli in 2014 during a different conflict to help a Haftar-allied force, U.S. officials said at the time.

Since 2014 the UAE and Egypt have provided the LNA with military equipment such as aircraft and helicopters, helping Haftar to gain the upper hand in Libya’s eight-year conflict, past U.N. reports have established.

The UAE even built an air base in Al Khadim in eastern Libya, one such report said in 2017.

The air strikes, which were also filmed by residents in video posted online, came after a day of heavy clashes in southern districts, with shelling audible in the city center.

A Libyan fighter loyal to the Government of National Accord fires a rocket propelled grenade during clashes with forces loyal to strongman Khalifa Haftar south of the capital Tripoli's suburb of Ain Zara, April 20, 2019.
A Libyan fighter loyal to the Government of National Accord fires a rocket propelled grenade during clashes with forces loyal to strongman Khalifa Haftar south of the capital Tripoli’s suburb of Ain Zara, April 20, 2019. VOA

Trump’s call to Haftar

The violence spiked after the White House said on Friday that President Donald Trump spoke by with Haftar earlier in the week.

The disclosure of the call and a U.S. statement that it “recognized Field Marshal Haftar’s significant role in fighting terrorism and securing Libya’s oil resources” has boosted the commander’s supporters and enraged his opponents.

Western powers and the Gulf have been divided over a push by Haftar’s forces to seize Tripoli, undermining calls by the United Nations for a ceasefire.

Both sides claimed progress in southern Tripoli Saturday, but no more details were immediately available.

A Reuters TV cameraman visiting the southern Khalat Furgan suburb heard heavy shelling but saw no apparent change in the frontline.

On Friday, two children were killed in shelling in southern Tripoli, residents said. The fighting has killed 220 people and wounded 1,066, the World Heath organization (WHO) said.

It was unclear why the White House waited several days to announce Monday’s phone call.

UN cease-fire

On Thursday, both the United States and Russia said they could not support a U.N. Security Council resolution calling for a ceasefire in Libya at this time.

Also Read: Experts Claim, Climate Change Can Affect Food, Water Security

Russia objects to the British-drafted resolution blaming Haftar for the latest flare-up in violence when his LNA advanced to the outskirts of Tripoli earlier this month, diplomats said.

The United States did not give a reason for its decision not to support the draft resolution, which would also call on countries with influence over the warring parties to ensure compliance and for unconditional humanitarian aid access in Libya. (IANS)