Sunday February 23, 2020

BP Problems in Youth May Lead to Heart Diseases: Study

BP problems linked to higher heart disease risk in youths

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Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of heart disease. Pixabay

Wide swings in blood pressure readings among young adults are associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease by middle age, according to a new health study.

The findings, published in the journal JAMA Cardiology, suggests that the current practice of averaging blood pressure readings to determine whether medications are necessary could be masking a potential early warning sign from the fluctuations themselves.

“If a patient comes in with one reading in December and a significantly lower reading in January, the average might be within the range that would appear normal,” said study lead author Yuichiro Yano from Duke University in the US.

“But is that difference associated with health outcomes in later life?” Yano said.

“That’s the question we sought to answer in this study, and it turns out the answer is yes.” Yano added.

Heart BP
A systolic blood pressure reading over 130 is considered hypertensive and has long been a major risk factor for heart diseases. (Representational Image). Pixabay

The researchers arrived at their conclusion after analysing 30 years of data from a large, diverse cohort of young people enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study between March 1985 and June 1986.

Of the 3,394 people studied, about 46 per cent were African American and 56 per cent were women.

The patients had regular blood pressure checks, with patterns evaluated across five visits, including at two, five, seven and 10 years. At the 10-year mark, the average age of the patients was about 35.

The main reading of concern to Yano’s research team was the systolic blood pressure level, the upper number in the equation that measures the pressure in the blood vessels when the heart pumps.

The researchers were able to identify which young people had variations in systolic blood pressure by the age of 35 and then track them over the next 20 years and see whether there appeared to be a correlating increase in cardiovascular disease.

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Over those years, study participants reported 181 deaths and 162 cardio-vascular events, which included fatal and nonfatal coronary heart disease, hospitalisation for heart failure, stroke, transient ischemic attack, or a stent procedure for blocked arteries.

The researchers found that each 3.6-mm spike in systolic blood pressure during young adulthood was associated with a 15-percent higher risk for heart disease events, independent of the averaged blood pressure levels during young adulthood and any single systolic blood pressure measurement in midlife. (IANS)

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Young Mothers are More Prone To Have Mental Health Problems: Study

Almost 40 per cent of young moms have more than one mental health issue, including depression, a range of anxiety disorders and hyperactivity

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Mothers
The study said identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children. Pixabay

Researchers have found that two out of three young mothers have at least one mental health issue.

The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that teen mothers have a much higher prevalence of mental health challenges than mothers aged 21 and older and teens who aren’t parents.

Almost 40 per cent of young moms have more than one mental health issue, including depression, a range of anxiety disorders and hyperactivity.

This is up to four times higher than in mothers aged 21 years or older and teens without children, the researchers said,

“Now that we understand that young mothers can struggle with problems other than just postpartum depression, our findings can be used to develop better screening processes, more effectively detect mental health problems in teenaged mothers, and direct treatment,” said study researcher Ryan Van Lieshout from McMaster University in Canada.

For the findings, Between 2012 and 2015, the Young Mothers Health Study recruited 450 mothers aged younger than 21 years old and 100 comparison mothers aged older than 20 years old at the time of their first delivery. The moms were from Hamilton, Niagara, Haldimand-Norfolk, and Brant counties.

This study is the one of the first in the world to use diagnostic interviews to examine a range of mental health problems beyond postpartum depression.

“Structured diagnostic interviews are the gold standard for this kind of research. We’re glad to have used this method to talk to hundreds of young mothers about their experiences,” said study lead author Van Lieshout.

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Researchers have found that two out of three young mothers have at least one mental health issue. Pixabay

Age-matched young mothers were also compared with 15 to 17-year-old women without children from the 2014 Ontario Child Health Study who were assessed for mental disorders, the researchers said.

The study said identifying and treating mental health issues in young mothers is especially important as their health also affects the wellbeing of their children.

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“Young mothers can face a great deal of adversity both before and after becoming a parent, yet next-to-nothing has been known about the rates and types of significant mental health problems among these women in our community,” Lieshout said. (IANS)