Wednesday November 13, 2019

Braces won’t Always Bring Happiness, Self-Confidence

Those who didn't have braces had varying levels of crooked teeth, just like those who had braces treatment

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Braces, Happiness, Self-Confidence
There was a pattern of higher psychosocial scores in people who did not have orthodontic treatment. Pixabay

Braces can help you get straight teeth but it may not always bring happiness and self-confidence, a study suggests.

Published in the journal Orthodontics and Craniofacial Research, the study followed 448 13-year-old kids from South Australia in 1988 and 1989. By the time that they turned 30 in 2005 and 2006 more than a third of them had received orthodontic treatment.

“The study, examined if having braces lead to a greater level of happiness or psychosocial outcomes, later in life. There was a pattern of higher psychosocial scores in people who did not have orthodontic treatment meaning people who hadn’t had braces fitted were significantly more optimistic than the ones that did have braces,” said Esma Dogramaci, Professor at the University of Adelaide.

“Those who didn’t have braces had varying levels of crooked teeth, just like those who had braces treatment — ranging from mild through to very severe,” Dogramaci said.

Braces, Happiness, Self-Confidence
Braces can help you get straight teeth but it may not always bring happiness and self-confidence. Pixabay

The study looked at four psychosocial aspects: how well people felt they coped with new or difficult situations and associated setbacks; how much they felt that could take care of their own health; the person believed that the support they received was from their personal network and their own level of optimism.

“These indicators were chosen because they are important for psychosocial functioning and are relevant to health behaviours and health outcomes; since the core research question was the impact of braces treatment on patients’ self-confidence and happiness in later life,” Dogramaci added.

During the study, dental student Alex Furlan, who has never had braces fitted: “My orthodontist recommended that I have braces fitted but I’m quite happy without them.

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“I’ve never felt the need to straighten my teeth – I can get on in life without having perfectly straight teeth.” (IANS)

Next Story

New Study Suggests Living Near Parks and Nature Linked to Greater Happiness

Parks near home good for your mental health

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Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being. Pixabay

Living within 300 metres of urban green space such as parks, nature reserves or play areas is associated with greater happiness, sense of worth and life satisfaction, says a new study.

Using data from UK government’s Annual Population Survey (APS) of 25,518 people, the researchers show that people who live within 300 metres of green space have significantly better mental well-being.

“A lot of research focuses on poor mental health, or single aspects of well-being like life satisfaction. What makes our work different is the way we consider multi-dimensional mental well-being in terms of happiness, life satisfaction and worth,” said Victoria Houlden from the University of Warwick.

The study, published in the journal Applied Geography, found that there is a very strong relationship between the amount of green space around a person’s home and their feelings of life satisfaction, happiness, and self-worth.

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The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health. Pixabay

Green space within 300 metres of home had the greatest influence on mental well-being.

The study found that proximity to green space was more important than lifestyle factors such as employment, income and general health.

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“By combining advanced statistical and mapping methods, we’ve shown that the effect is real and substantial. Basically we’ve proven what everyone has always assumed was true,” said Scott Weich, Professor at the University of Sheffield. (IANS)