Monday June 18, 2018

Father’s Stress Linked To Kids’ Brain Development

The researchers have unraveled new details about these microRNA changes

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brain development
The researchers noted that by learning more about links between a father's exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders. Pixabay
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Fathers, take note! Taking too much stress may affect the brain development of your kids, a new study has claimed.

According to the researchers, the stress changes the father’s sperm which can then alter the brain development of the child.

Previously, the researchers including Tracy Bale at the University of Maryland School found that adult male mice, experiencing chronic periods of mild stress, have offspring with a reduced response to stress; changes in stress reactivity have been linked to some neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and PTSD.

ALSO READ: Whole-brain radiation technique to treat brain cancer causes memory loss: Study

brain development
This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of their kids. Pixabay

They isolated the mechanism of the reduced response; they found that the father’s sperm showed changes in a genetic material known as microRNA. MicroRNA are important because they play a key role in which genes become functional proteins.

Now, the researchers have unraveled new details about these microRNA changes.

In the male reproductive tract, the caput epididymis, the structure where sperm matures, releases tiny vesicles packed with microRNA that can fuse with sperm to change its cargo delivered to the egg, they said.

The caput epididymis responded to the father’s stress by altering the content of these vesicles, the researchers added.

The result of the study, presented at AAAS 2018 annual meeting in Austin, suggests that even mild environmental challenges can have a significant impact on the development and potentially the health of future offspring.

ALSO READ: Maternal Depression May Affect Child’s Brain Development at Critical Stages in Life

The researchers also noted that by learning more about links between a father’s exposure to stress and the risks of disease for his kid, we can better understand, detect, and prevent these disorders. (IANS)

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Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate

Stress and tension leads to fluctuation in heart rate

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Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate
Take Less Stress And Tension To Maintain Proper Heart Rate, Pixabay

Too much job pressure may increase your risk developing a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to a stroke, dementia, heart failure and other complications.

The study found that being stressed at work was associated with a 48 per cent higher risk of atrial fibrillation.

“Work stress has previously been linked with coronary heart disease. Work stress should be considered a modifiable risk factor for preventing atrial fibrillation and coronary heart disease,” said study author Eleonor Fransson from Jonkoping University in Sweden.

Blood pressure monitor
Blood pressure monitor, Pixabay

“People who feel stressed at work and have palpitations or other symptoms of atrial fibrillation should see their doctor and speak to their employer about improving the situation at work,” she explained.

Also read: Eat less saturated trans fats to curb heart disease who

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, included 13,200 participants enrolled into the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) in 2006, 2008, or 2010.

For the study, the team defined work stress as job strain, which refers to jobs with high psychological demands combined with low control over the work situation.

Participants were employed and had no history of atrial fibrillation, heart attack, or heart failure.

They also completed postal surveys on sociodemographics, lifestyle, health, and work-related factors which included questions on job demands and control.

Heart rate
Heart rate, Flickr

After a median follow-up of 5.7 years, the researchers identified that work stress was a risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

“Atrial fibrillation is a common condition with serious consequences and therefore it is of major public health importance to find ways of preventing it,” Fransson explained.

The symptoms of atrial fibrillation, according to the authors, may include palpitations, weakness, fatigue, feeling light headed, dizziness, and shortness of breath. (IANS)