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Brain Drain: India needs to Empower its Educational Institutions

With a a pay scale ranging between 5000 and 15,000, it is not surprising that the teaching profession is no longer attracting the best talent.

  • Each year, at least 125,000 students go out leading to an outflow of ₹200,000 crore annually
  • While those in the big private schools are well paid, the teachers in most of the private schools get a pay scale ranging between 5000 and 15,000
  • The only way to control the spiraling cost of education is to create good state supply at a cheaper cost

Many well-to-do families send their kids abroad for higher education as they feel Indian educational institutions lack infrastructure and scope for better education. These children go abroad and spend almost Rs 1.5 crore for an undergraduate course. According to a survey, each year, at least 125,000 students go out leading to an outflow of ₹200,000 crore annually and with each passing year numbers are rising.

As a result, the best of Indian minds do get access to the good educational facilities in India and as they result, either they struggle to make their way to a foreign university or their lives are doomed due to lack of financial support. When looked at on a broader prospect, this has resulted in brain drain, in true sense of the term.

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Except for Supreme court that is working to bring a transparent system, Government officials are not showing active involvement to counter the drawbacks of India’s education system. The trend of accepting ‘donations’ by Government Institutions is so rampant, they it fails to focus on the quality education. ‘Bribe’ in the form of ‘donation’ are forced on the students, once they make their way to these institutes.

According to the 2014 educational statistics report from the Ministry of Human Resource, the number of schools in the country at 14,25,564. The pupil to teacher ratio at the primary level is 28 while at the senior secondary level is 40. And 43% of school teachers in India are now working under privately managed schools. That’s about 4.2 million teachers, of which 3.1 million teach in elementary schools.

The government school teachers get pay scales ranging between Rs 20,000 to Rs 40,000 per month depending on their level of qualification and experience and get additional hikes and pension plans after each government re-election, while most of the private school teachers suffer due to underpay.

Apart from few Big private schools that pay their teachers well, most of the teachers in private schools get a mere payscale ranging between 5000 and 15,000. Hence, it is not surprising that the teaching profession is no longer attracting the best talent. Here, what India needs to know is that there is a difference between buying teachers and bringing good teachers to a institution.

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People have the notion that teaching is a “noble-profession” and education being “non- profit”. This has cost us dearly with the loss of beautiful minds and will continue to hurt us in our global ambitions. The government must empower institutions and let them compete in the market. The good ones will survive and the bad ones will die, and that is a good result.

There are not more than 20,000 students travelling to India to study here. Most of these students are from South Asia and Africa, driven primarily by grants based on agreements between the two governments.

Main Building of IIT Kharagpur Image Source: Wikipedia Commons

“The IITs have been funded, subsidized, given land and buildings and still charge almost ₹8 lakh for four years, much more than the fees fixed by the empowered fees fixation committee (at times it is as low as ₹32,000 per year). The IIMs, fully funded, subsidized with zero cost of infrastructure and capital creation charge upwards of ₹15 lakh, while states impose a fees cap of around ₹2 lakh for an MBA. The real cost per student for an IIM is upwards of ₹1 crore. Ever wonder why education is so bad? The only way to control the spiraling cost of education is to create good state supply at a cheaper cost. They should act as a correcting force and a deterrent through market forces.”, says Mahesh Peri of the Huffington Post.

-This article is compiled by a staff-writer at NewsGram.

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