Sunday January 21, 2018

Your brain can perform better after a brief exercise

A study by Heath shows that people can cycle or walk briskly for a short duration, even once, and find immediate benefits.

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Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
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  • Brief exercise before an interview could result in better performance
  • Even cycling or a walk for a short duration could help
  • A task was performed to examine the study

Toronto, Dec 22, 2017: Students may please take note that exercising for a brief period before writing a test or going for an interview may improve performance. Researchers have found that just 10 minutes of exercise can prime the parts of the brain that help us focus and solve problems.

“Some people can’t commit to a long-term exercise regime because of time or physical capacity,” said study co-author Matthew Heath, Professor at the University of Western Ontario in Canada.

“This (study) shows that people can cycle or walk briskly for a short duration, even once, and find immediate benefits,” Heath said.

The findings, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, have implications for older people in the early stages of dementia who may be less mobile, and for anyone else looking to gain a quick mental edge in their work.

During the study, the research participants either sat and read a magazine or did 10 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise on a stationary bicycle.

Following the reading and exercise session, the researchers used eye-tracking equipment to examine participants’ reaction times to a cognitively demanding eye movement task.

The task was designed to challenge areas of the brain responsible for executive function such as decision-making and inhibition.

“Those who had exercised showed immediate improvement. Their responses were more accurate and their reaction times were up to 50 milliseconds shorter than their pre-exercise values,” said Heath.

“That may seem minuscule but it represented a 14 percent gain in cognitive performance in some instances,” Heath explained, adding that he is conducting a study now to determine how long the benefits may last following exercise. (IANS)

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How sexual violence in neighbourhood affects your health

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime

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Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
Sexual violence in neighborhood can affect the mental health of women. Pexels
  • Sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm your health.
  • Neighbourhood plays a vital role in human behaviour.
  • Men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure.

A study finds sexual violence in the neighbourhood can harm the physical and mental health of women. Neighbourhoods play a key role in the behaviour and development of people, previous studies show and some conditions — such as crime, segregation, poverty and disorder — can have harmful effects on health.

Researchers conducted interviews with nearly 350 adults in nine neighbourhoods in a major American city with high rates of poverty, unemployment and crime.

“Feeling unsafe, especially in and around your home, can erode physical and mental health,” said Dana M. Prince, co-author of the study and assistant professor at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences at Case Western Reserve University.

Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels
Researchers say men can be more aware of what makes women feel insecure. Pexels

According to the researchers, feelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighbourhood are significantly tied to women’s perceptions of its safety.

“Our results could mean men are less aware of sexual violence, or perhaps they do not feel comfortable reporting that it makes them feel less safe — perhaps both — while women tend to be socialised early on to be aware of the possibility of sexual attack,” Prince added.

Participants were asked how often particular crimes occurred in their neighbourhood in the past six months.

“Our results indicate that men can become more aware of how women feel about what contributes to and threaten their safety,” the researcher said.

The study was published in the Journal of Community Psychology. (IANS)

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