Wednesday June 20, 2018

Your brain can perform better after a brief exercise

A study by Heath shows that people can cycle or walk briskly for a short duration, even once, and find immediate benefits.

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Structure of brain can help find the causes behind epilepsy.
Structure of brain can help find the causes behind epilepsy.
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  • Brief exercise before an interview could result in better performance
  • Even cycling or a walk for a short duration could help
  • A task was performed to examine the study

Toronto, Dec 22, 2017: Students may please take note that exercising for a brief period before writing a test or going for an interview may improve performance. Researchers have found that just 10 minutes of exercise can prime the parts of the brain that help us focus and solve problems.

“Some people can’t commit to a long-term exercise regime because of time or physical capacity,” said study co-author Matthew Heath, Professor at the University of Western Ontario in Canada.

“This (study) shows that people can cycle or walk briskly for a short duration, even once, and find immediate benefits,” Heath said.

The findings, published in the journal Neuropsychologia, have implications for older people in the early stages of dementia who may be less mobile, and for anyone else looking to gain a quick mental edge in their work.

During the study, the research participants either sat and read a magazine or did 10 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise on a stationary bicycle.

Following the reading and exercise session, the researchers used eye-tracking equipment to examine participants’ reaction times to a cognitively demanding eye movement task.

The task was designed to challenge areas of the brain responsible for executive function such as decision-making and inhibition.

“Those who had exercised showed immediate improvement. Their responses were more accurate and their reaction times were up to 50 milliseconds shorter than their pre-exercise values,” said Heath.

“That may seem minuscule but it represented a 14 percent gain in cognitive performance in some instances,” Heath explained, adding that he is conducting a study now to determine how long the benefits may last following exercise. (IANS)

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Overweight And Normal Dogs Behavior Similar To Humans

The behavior had possible parallels with overweight people

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A Labrador retriever named Jack dines at a pet restaurant in San Juan, Manila, Philippines, Sept. 6, 2014.
A Labrador retriever named Jack dines at a pet restaurant in San Juan, Manila, Philippines, Sept. 6, 2014. VOA

Researchers in Hungary who found that normal and overweight dogs behaved differently in tasks involving food say the dogs’ responses were similar to those that might be expected from normal and overweight humans.

The study suggested dogs could be used as models for future research into the causes and psychological impact of human obesity, the authors of the paper from Budapest’s ELTE University said.

Researchers put two bowls — one holding a good meal, the other empty or containing less attractive food — in front of a series of dogs.

The study found that canines of a normal weight continued obeying instructions to check the second bowl for food, but the obese ones refused after a few rounds.

“We expected the overweight dog to do anything to get food, but in this test, we saw the opposite. The overweight dogs took a negative view,” test leader Orsolya Torda said.

Dog
Dog, Pixabay

“If a situation is uncertain and they cannot find food, the obese dogs are unwilling to invest energy to search for food — for them, the main thing is to find the right food with least energy involved.”

The behavior had possible parallels with overweight people who see food as a reward, said the paper, which was published in the Royal Society Open Science journal. (VOA)

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