Wednesday March 20, 2019

Breastfeeding Longer may Improve Mothers’ Sensitivity

However, the study is not intended to diminish the bonding experiences of women who are not able to breastfeed

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Breastfeeding
How breastfeeding is linked to being a righty or lefty. Pixabay

Women breastfeeding their children for longer periods exhibit more maternal sensitivity well past the infant and toddler years, according to a study.

Maternal sensitivity was defined as the synchronous timing of a mother’s responsiveness to her child, her emotional tone, her flexibility in her behaviour and her ability to read her child’s cues.

“It was surprising to us that breastfeeding duration predicted change over time in maternal sensitivity,” said lead author Jennifer Weaver, from the Boise State University in Idaho.

“We had prior research suggesting a link between breastfeeding and early maternal sensitivity, but nothing to indicate that we would continue to see effects of breastfeeding significantly beyond the period when breastfeeding had ended.”

Further, even though increased breastfeeding duration led to greater maternal sensitivity over time, the effect sizes were small.

Breastfeeding
A mother breastfeeding her child. Pixabay

That means the close interaction experienced during breastfeeding may be only one of many ways the bond is strengthened between mother and child, according to the study, published in the journal Developmental Psychology.

Conversely, there was no correlation between the mother’s breastfeeding length and father’s sensitivity toward their children.

For the study, the team analysed data from interviews with 1,272 families, when their infants were a month old, and followed them periodically until the children turned 11.

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However, the study is not intended to diminish the bonding experiences of women who are not able to breastfeed, Weaver said.

“Ultimately, I do hope that we will see breastfeeding examined more closely as a parenting factor, not just as a health consideration, to allow us to more fully understand the role that breastfeeding plays in family life,” Weaver noted. (Bollywood Country)

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Fathers Experience More Happiness Than Mothers in Their Parenthood, Says Study

"Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children," said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US

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Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Fathers experience more well-being and satisfaction than mothers in their parenthood and even when interacting with their children, a new study suggests.

Researchers from the University of California in the US analysed three separate studies consisting of 18,000 people that looked at the scale of happiness, psychological satisfaction, depressive symptoms and stress among others.

The first two studies compared the well-being of parents with that of people who do not have children.

The findings published in the journal “Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin”, showed that fathers reported greater satisfaction with their lives and feelings of connectedness to others.

Father and son
Father and son, Pixabay

They also reported greater positive emotions and fewer daily hassles than mothers, or relatives or peers without children.

They even showed fewer depressive symptoms than men without children, whereas mothers reported more depressive symptoms than women who do not have children.

The third study considered parenthood and well-being while engaging in childcare or interacting with children compared to other daily activities.

Men were found to be happier while caring for their children than women suggesting that gender significantly impacted the association between childcare and happiness.

Child, baby, father
A man twirls a young child on a waterfront park as downtown Seattle disappears in a smoky haze behind, Aug. 19, 2018. VOA

In terms of daily interactions also men reported greater happiness.

One possible explanation given said fathers were more likely to indicate they were playing with their children while they were caring for them or interacting with them as compared to the mothers.

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“Fathers may fare better than mothers in part due to how they spend their time with their children,” said Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Assistant Professor at the Sewanee, The University of the South in the US. (IANS)