Wednesday September 19, 2018

Breastfeeding Now, Will Reduce Chances of Stroke Later in Post-Menopausal Stage

Others include getting adequate exercise, choosing healthy foods and not smoking

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Breast milk is believed to be the healthiest nutrition
Feeding your baby breast mil for the first 6 months is recommended for the nutritional benefits it provides. Pixabay
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Mothers, take note. Breastfeeding may reduce the risk for stroke in post-menopausal women, a new study has found.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, showed 23 per cent lower risk of stroke among women who breastfed their babies.

“Some studies have reported that breastfeeding may reduce the rates of breast cancer, ovarian cancer and risk of developing Type-2 diabetes in mothers,” said lead author Lisette T. Jacobson, Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine-Wichita.

“Recent findings point to the benefits of breastfeeding on heart disease and other specific cardiovascular risk factors,” Jacobson added.

For the study, the research team analysed data of 80,191 participants in a large ongoing study that has tracked the medical events and health habits of postmenopausal women who were recruited between 1993 and 1998.

breastfeeding
Breastfeeding is only one of many factors that could potentially protect against stroke

All women in this analysis had delivered one or more children and 58 per cent reported ever having breastfed. Among these women, 51 per cent breastfed for one-six months, 22 per cent for seven-12 months and 27 per cent for 13 or more months.

At the time of recruitment, the average age was 63.7 years and the follow-up period was 12.6 years, the researchers said.

The researchers found that a longer reported length of breastfeeding was associated with a greater reduction in stroke risk.

“Breastfeeding is only one of many factors that could potentially protect against stroke,” Jacobson said.

Also Read: The Plight of India’s Homeless Women Increases As Cities Expand

“Others include getting adequate exercise, choosing healthy foods, not smoking and seeking treatment if needed to keep your blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar in the normal range,” Jacobson noted. (IANS)

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Asthma Ups The Chance Of Obesity: Study

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood.

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Obesity, Asthma
Asthma may up obesity risk. Pixabay

While obesity is already known as a risk factor for developing asthma, a new research led by one of an Indian-origin has showed that people with the airway disease are also more likely to become obese.

The study indicates that those who develop asthma as adults and those who have non-allergic asthma are at the greatest risk of obesity.

The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought and more research is needed to better understand and tackle these two growing health challenges, the researchers said.

Obesity, Asthma
They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on Flickr Commons

“We already know that obesity can be a trigger for asthma, perhaps via a physiological, metabolic or inflammatory change,” said Subhabrata Moitra, research student at the ISGlobal – the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

However, the researchers do not know the reason why having asthma increases the risk of developing obesity or whether different asthma treatments have any effect on this risk.

The team included 8,618 people from 12 countries who were followed for 20 years.

Obesity, Pregnancy
The relationship between asthma and obesity is more complex than previously thought. Pixabay

They found that 10.2 per cent of people with asthma at the start of the study had become obese ten years on. Among people who did not have asthma, 7.7 per cent were obese ten years later.

Also Read: Exposure to Pollen During Pregnancy May up The risk of Asthma in Kids

The increase in the risk of obesity was even greater in people whose asthma began in adulthood. It was also greater in people who had asthma but did not suffer with allergies, the findings showed.

The results were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress in Paris. (IANS)